What other Golden Age revivals should there have been in the Silver Age?

There weren't any further Silver Age revivals from the Golden Age after the Spectre (as far as I know - does Red Tornado count?), which has always been a disappointment to me. I think Wildcat, Black Canary and Dr Fate would have made interesting reboots. Possibly Dr Midnight and Hourman. These are characters, like Hawkman, that visually wouldn't have needed much of a revamp.

 

What Silver Age revivals of Golden Age characters do you think would have worked as an on going series?

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>> I meant no GA hero had his own book in the SA (I'm not counting the Spectre).

 

I'm not sure why you're not counting the Spectre, since he was certainly a GA hero who had his own book in the SA. But in any event, DC had yet another GA hero (not a costumed superhero) who had his own book in the late SA, and his moderately successful revival (21 issues from 1968-1971, plus a brief one-shot revival in 1977) led to a spinoff series that revived yet another GA hero. I think I've provided enough clues to whom I'm talking about.

I thought Binky might be the character you were getting at, though calling him a hero would be a stretch of the definition. But, in checking the publication history, it doesn't fit your specs. However, Binky can be added to the list of Golden-Agers who had Silver-Age revivals, can he not?

The other Golden Age hero must be Buzzy, whom the GCD tells me appeared in Binky's Buddies. Binky's own title was revived as Leave it to Binky for 11 issues before it became Binky for a final 11, including that belated issue.

 

The cover of Binky's Buddies #9 has a snuck-past-the-Code sex joke. (Teen humour comics sometimes recycled cover gags. I've seen this gag on another without the sexual innuendo.)

 

(Corrected and corrected again.)

Luke is correct, the answer is indeed Binky, and his buddy Buzzy (I don't think Binky and Buzzy ever met in their original titles, though I suppose it could've happened).

 

Here's the cover to Binky's Buddies # 9, although it's pretty tame in the innuendo department.

There was very briefly an Earth-1 Sandman by Jack Kirby, but he missed the Silver Age by quite a bit.

Then there was The Demon, who looked exactly like the demon Prince Valiant dressed up like to scare off Vikings way back when his comic strip first started. How did Jack get away with that? I was shocked to see Etrigan running around in an old comic strip!

Henry R. Kujawa said:

By comparison, the Johnny Blaze flaming-skull biker GHOST RIDER was a very cool concept, and total re-design. The only problem I have with it, now, is I think the name was all wrong. (Gary Friedrich's earlier, short-lived HELL RIDER would have been a much more suitable name for a flaming-skull biker FROM HELL.)

I think they wanted to protect the name Ghost Rider from the competition. Even if the Comics Code had approved the title Hell Rider they may have shied away from it because of distribution concerns. I'm sure Son of Satan had distribution problems because of its title.

Luke Blanchard said:

I don't know reviving one of the kid gangs of the Golden Age would've been worth trying, but the kid gang idea might've been.

I think by the mid 50s the concept of kid gangs had too much of a negative connotation, which continues to this day.

Dandy Forsdyke said:

Yes, I think Hourman would have have a different device to gain powers for an hour than popping a pill.Perhaps some kind of internal self-timing device.

I agree that a new version of Hourman could have worked without the pills. I'll never understand why a hero would advertise his weakness in his name. "Why do you call yourself Hourman?" "Uh, because my powers only last 60 minutes."

Philip Portelli said:

If Doctor Fate couldn't get his own series in the Silver Age, I can't see any other JSAer getting one either.

I think the problem with Doctor Fate was that his face was obscured. I know at one point they tried a half-mask, which didn't last. He would have been better off with no mask at all. As far as I know, he really had no life outside of his character and lived in a sealed headquarters. Why not show his face?

I have to agree with Dave Blanchard that sadly, DC missed the boat by not giving the Justice Society their own title as a companion to the Justice League of America series, even if they did call it something other than All Star Comics.

It could of mixed full length adventure issues with individual stories issues to spotlight the whole Golden Age cast.

The only other Golden Age characters I can think of (that I don't think have been mentioned before now) is the Seven Soldiers of Victory.

DC did a lot of vault cleaning the 1970s, hence the unused Golden Age Flash scripts with new art, and an unused S7 script got serialized with new art over several issues of Adventure Comics.

I have to agree with Dave Blanchard that sadly, DC missed the boat by not giving the Justice Society their own title

To be fair, Julie did several team-up adventures among JSA members, Starman and Black Canary in B&B and Dr. Fate and Hourman in Showcase. Those didn't lead to anything more--while the next four Showcase tryouts (Enemy Ace, Teen Titans, Spectre, and Inferior 5) all went on to their own titles. So those heroes apparently weren't convincing as a new title.

Certainly a JSA title would've been different from those smaller team-ups, but DC didn't just ignore the idea.

-- MSA

DC didn't completely ignore the idea, but they never gave the fans what we really wanted, either, which was a full-scale revival of the JSA in its own title. Not a few random pairings, not the occasional guest-stars in doppelganger titles, not the solo title that SPECTRE got (which ended up becoming more of a mystery comic than a superhero comic before it was mercy-cancelled) -- I'm talking a regular title in the JLA vein. Preferably written by Fox or Broome, edited by Schwartz, and drawn probably by Murphy Anderson (who seemed to be the default artist for most of the JSA-related projects).

My guess, and it's strictly a guess, is that Schwartz didn't have the time to take on another title, but he didn't want anybody else on the title either, so it just lay in limbo till the Silver Age petered out and then finally, one day, Gerry Conway raised his hand and said, "Hey, I'll do it!"

Richard Willis said:

I agree that a new version of Hourman could have worked without the pills. I'll never understand why a hero would advertise his weakness in his name. "Why do you call yourself Hourman?" "Uh, because my powers only last 60 minutes."

Supreme confidence in his abilities. He knows how long it will last, you know how long it will last, and he knows he can beat you.


If I recall correctly, the thinking at the time was that a full-blown "Justice Society" title might be too confusing with the Justice League title already running. I suspect this was the same reason that when the "Robin, Aqualad & Kid Flash" team-up proved popular enough to try as a real team, they were dubbed "The Teen Titans" instead of the more obvious "Junior Justice League". It's hard to imagine in these days of multiple JL-whatever titles, and uncountable X-Men titles, but back in the day, publishers were leery of diluting their brands.

Dave Blanchard said:

DC didn't completely ignore the idea, but they never gave the fans what we really wanted, either, which was a full-scale revival of the JSA in its own title. Not a few random pairings, not the occasional guest-stars in doppelganger titles, not the solo title that SPECTRE got (which ended up becoming more of a mystery comic than a superhero comic before it was mercy-cancelled) -- I'm talking a regular title in the JLA vein. Preferably written by Fox or Broome, edited by Schwartz, and drawn probably by Murphy Anderson (who seemed to be the default artist for most of the JSA-related projects).

My guess, and it's strictly a guess, is that Schwartz didn't have the time to take on another title, but he didn't want anybody else on the title either, so it just lay in limbo till the Silver Age petered out and then finally, one day, Gerry Conway raised his hand and said, "Hey, I'll do it!"

Dave Elyea, you might be right, but given how many titles Superman and Batman appeared in during the Silver Age, I doubt DC was really terribly concerned with brand dilution. I think more likely, they figured they'd milk every last twelve cents out of kids' pockets that they could,

Given all the horse-trading that went on between DC's editors back in the 1960s, I think it's more likely that Schwartz couldn't clear his schedule of any regular titles (at least, during the period when a JSA title seemed most likely), so the new title just never got okayed. Still makes me wonder why Schwartz didn't at least try out a full-fledged JSA title in SHOWCASE, just to see the kind of reception the thing got. Using such relative stiffs as Starman and Hourman as the main attractions was almost dooming the SHOWCASE and B&B tryouts.

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