As we are about to embark one the next box of my unread comics, I would like to thank all of you who come to read and/or comment on these threads. When I first started this project back in July 2006  (really?) on the old board I never thought I would even make it through the first box. The threads have helped keep me semi-honest here.

I'm pretty excited about this upcoming box. It is a very eclectic mix of comics. There are a bunch of my old standbys. Like Legion comics, Daredevil, Marvel Team-up, war comics. There is a ton of other stuff like '80s black and white comics, some Kirby, a touch of Vertigo. I don't know how much will inspire me to write about, and if it does others to comment, but I am looking forward to it.

I'm really stoked to have you with me. Let's get it on!

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I really like the cover of this one.

 

Bomba was a juvenile book series hero who appeared in movies in 1949-1955. They were edited into a TV series, and that may have led to the DC series. Wikipedia has a page on the character (which is one of my sources).

I've read a single issue from the series - #2 - but that was by a different creative team. That issue is told in the normal comic book style and has uninteresting writing and art. The tale is an ordinary lost race story.

Love that Black Hole comic, and actually managed to track down #4. The story is not concluded there - supposedly there were to be six issues and the last two were only published in Europe (or, more likely, not at all). It's a wild story and I sure wish I knew where they were going with it.

The novelization is recommended. Clears up some of the film's goofiness and has a much better ending.

Luke Blanchard said:

Lambiek's page on McWilliams is here. I want to read Twin Earths some day.

 

I saw a copy of the The Black Hole novelisation the other day, and had a quick look to see how it ended, because the end of the movie is ambiguous. If I followed it correctly the escaping crew (including V.I.N.CENT.) become bodiless and are mentally fused. I wish I'd bought it now.

Luke, the last issue is by the same creative team as the on I reviewed, and it is told in the traditional way. I guess it was just a one issue experiment.

Luke Blanchard said:

I've read a single issue from the series - #2 - but that was by a different creative team. That issue is told in the normal comic book style and has uninteresting writing and art. The tale is an ordinary lost race story.

Brave and Bold #88
Feb.-Mar. 1970
Cover art by: Neal Adams


Story: Count 10 ...and DIE!
Writer: Bob Haney
Pencils: Irv Novick
Inks: Mike Esposito

Man, this is one wacky comic. The basis is that Bruce Wayne wants Ted Grant to train some kids in boxing for the World Youth Games. He is also trying to build up Ted's confidence throughout. Including for a boxing match against a younger, stronger opponent. Who by the way, Batman pretty much forces him into fighting. Meanwhile, as Batman he is on the trail of of free agent spy, who screwed the U.S. out of some codes they had paid him for. Coincidentally enough, the games take place in Austria, and that is where the spy is as well!

Bruce Wayne takes a beating in the beginning in order to get Ted Grant to help train the kids. He paid some dudes to it, but it really only makes sense if he knew Ted would refuse at first. As Batman he fights Ted on a ferris wheel, and throws the fight to build him up for the fight against Koslov “The Hammer”. Who is very clearly, Russian, but is never named as such.

Then you also have the part that has reached infamous heights: the actual boxing match. During the fight the lights go out...Batman set it up as some sort of plan to help Ted Grant out. Well Ted kidnaps Koslov, takes off on a motorcycle to a location outside of Veinna, frees a captured Batman (long story), drives back and gets back into the ring with Koslov JUST as the lights turn back on. So insane. Needless to say, Ted wind the fight.

Oh, and Batman gets the codes.

I do think that is a striking cover by Adams. The kids forming a wall between Batman and Wildcat. Wildcat cowering back. Nifty

"Because Bob Haney, that's why"

As I'm sure most of you could tell, I totally stole that one. 

Travis' description of this old B&B is what makes Showcase Presents such an attractive option as far as I'm concerned; I wouldn't pay the steep prices for old back issues but the price of SP would let me indulge in Haney wackiness.  I have to get one of these volumes sometime soon.

...I bought a couple back then .

  IIRC , there were Bomba B-pictures during the B-Movie Era , but never a dedicated TV series , though the movies were shown on TV , and I think some TV stations may have promoted them/shown them in some kind of order . I don't believe there were as many as 13 , or even , really , 10 , however .

  The old boy's books the movies were based upon seemed to show Bomba as a pompadoured-ish blonde boy , and/or the actor in the B-movies was .

  The comic book showed Bomba with Beatles/Byrds/Monkees/Lovin' Spoonful brunette bowl hair , as mid-60s as could be , but...........

  Could it be that a new TV version was in the planning stages , and the comic's promotion - and the groovy swingin' Jungle Boy - was based upon that anticipation , but it never went thru ????????? Later on , in TARZN FAMILY , DC reprinted the stories reprinted into , Zimba , The Jungle Boy , or such rot .

  BTW , I am told that the ( South America-set ) books REALLY overload on the casual " White man , he the boss " racism , FAR more than any ERB !!!!!!!!!!!
Luke Blanchard said:

I really like the cover of this one.

 

Bomba was a juvenile book series hero who appeared in movies in 1949-1955. They were edited into a TV series, and that may have led to the DC series. Wikipedia has a page on the character (which is one of my sources).

The Ron Ely Tarzan TV series appeared in 1966-1968. At the time Gold Key had the rights to Tarzan and Korak - both characters had titles - so my guess is DC wanted to do a Tarzan-like or Korak-like character, and Bomba was the highest-profile one it could get. Possibly what it wanted to do was a Korak-like character and using Bomba was better than creating its own because that way there was no danger of a copyright challenge. DC took over the Tarzan and Korak, Son of Tarzan titles in 1972. After 14 issues it converted Korak into Tarzan Family.

 

According to Wikipedia's page on Bomba the character's movies, edited into a series called Zim Bomba, were a prime time (!) "local ratings sensation" for the Chicago station WGN-TV in 1962. Presumably other stations picked the series up. It could have still been replaying on various stations in the second half of the decade, in kids' timeslots or late at night. The covers of the first two issues of DC's series proclaimed Bomba "TV's teen jungle star!" The actor who had played Bomba was Johnny Sheffield, who had earlier been Boy in the RKO/Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan movies.

Comments on Brave & Bold #88:

  • Rereading it from Showcase Presents: Brave & Bold Batman Team-Ups Vol. 2, the first thing you notice (well, I noticed!) was that it's more of a Batman/Ted Grant pairing than the Feline Fury. Wildcat appears in costume for two pages.
  • It has a lot in common with The Spectre #3 with Wildcat having to be pushed into action and finding out that he has more to offer in his advanced age.
  • This, of course, is infamous as the "debut" of the Earth-One Wildcat or as purists say the Earth-B Wildcat!
  • The opponent from Ted's past was a recurring theme. It appeared in four out of five of Wildcat's B&B issues!

...I suppose we could look up and see what kind of " editing " the station , or whoever , did with the Bomba movies !!!!!

  I was thinking as I wrote the above that I had seen something like what you are citing , maybe even that some famed TV programmer's rise to fame was , partly , moved along by his great success with the Bomba movies shown locally as one of his early achivements .

!!!

  In pre-1980 TV , independent stations often went to some varying degree of making a " series " out of old B-pictures , I recall , in the NYC metroplex , WNEW-TV showing various of the Bowery Boys/East Side Kids/whatever films ( I recall that Leonard Maltin gave a brief , authoratative-sounding , explanation of exactly what the differences and links between these various sereis were in his old movies-on-TV annual . ) under the ID card title " East Side Comedy " and showing the ( There's more than 26 all told , so it's , literally , a series' worth . ) same-two-actors BLONDIE movies regularly in the same time slot as well , both tended to be on Sat-AM - Competing with the networks' stuff so I didn't watch 'em !!!!!!!!!!! - IIRC .

  WPIX-TV in the same area showed Abbot & Costellos' movies at 11:30 Sunday morning for DECADES , I believe...They didn't have a title card saying " Abbot And Costello Showcase " or anything , just a " WPIX-TV Sunday Movie " or something , presumably copyright/tradmark issues .

  My family were at least semi-regular goith-to-church/otherwise going out on Sunday , so I dodn't see them much . They were edited down to a 90-min commercial TV time slot .

Luke Blanchard said:

The Ron Ely Tarzan TV series appeared in 1966-1968. At the time Gold Key had the rights to Tarzan and Korak - both characters had titles - so my guess is DC wanted to do a Tarzan-like or Korak-like character, and Bomba was the highest-profile one it could get. Possibly what it wanted to do was a Korak-like character and using Bomba was better than creating its own because that way there was no danger of a copyright challenge. DC took over the Tarzan and Korak, Son of Tarzan titles in 1972. After 14 issues it converted Korak into Tarzan Family.

 

According to Wikipedia's page on Bomba the character's movies, edited into a series called Zim Bomba, were a prime time (!) "local ratings sensation" for the Chicago station WGN-TV in 1962. Presumably other stations picked the series up. It could have still been replaying on various stations in the second half of the decade, in kids' timeslots or late at night. The covers of the first two issues of DC's series proclaimed Bomba "TV's teen jungle star!" The actor who had played Bomba was Johnny Sheffield, who had earlier been Boy in the RKO/Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan movies.

Brave and Bold #96
June-July 1971
Cover art by: Nick Cardy and Murphy Anderson


Story: The Striped Pants War!
Writer: Bob Haney
Art: Nick Cardy

The GCD says Nick Cardy did the bulk of this cover, with Murphy Anderson doing the Batman figure. The Sgt. Rock looks a lot like Joe Kubert, so I figure that was intentional.

This is another book that takes place in the unofficial Haneyverse. Here Bruce Wayne and Sergeant Rock are war buddies from World War II. Rock has been given a cushy job at an embassy in South America. He blunders it when he allows the ambassador to get kidnapped. Bruce Wayne is made temporary ambassador and heads on down. At the same time Batman will be his unofficial backup and will be following along secretly.

We get a brief, joyous reunion between Rock and Wayne at the embassy. Then Rock becomes a whiny little...well you know. Since his screwup on security the army has told him he wont be allowed to re-enlist. He shows us the scars he has gotten in combat, uses a pejorative term for an Asian (which I am pretty sure wouldn't fly today).

There is a traitor in the embassy, and all of the evidence points to ol' Sergeant Rock. They put him under house arrest, and he escapes. Of course Batman and Rock solve that mystery. Figure out where the ambassador was taken to (hidden in the U.S. embassy). Then the complete shocker when we find out who the traitor is, he has the drop on Batman, and Alfred just casually shoots him. It doesn't even cause a response from anyone else.  A total surprise, I never saw it coming. This grim and gritty turn in comics will never take off.

My question: what the hell does the “Striped Pants War!” refer to?

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