Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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Here’s one where the cover is designed as a board game



Peter Wrexham said:

Steve W said:

Interestingly, in Britain, checkers is called draughts.  This threw me at the beginning of the month, as I wasn't sure how to find a cover with "checkers" on, as I didn't know what "checkers" was.  Now I do. Wonder why the game has two totally different names, either side of the pond?

We had a bit of a discussion about differing names for games over on the "Three of a Kind" thread (starting here).  The game called "Draughts" in the UK is, as you say, "Checkers" in the US.  Other corresponding names are:  "Cluedo" (UK) versus "Clue" (US);  "Snakes and Ladders" vs "Chutes and Ladders"; "Ludo" vs "Parcheesi".

Incidentally, I've been counting what sorts of games are represented on the covers we've had so far this month.  My reckoning is:

  • Playing cards - 59 (most of these covers don't depict a specific type of game, just cards in general)
  • Chess - 25 (including a check tablecloth with no actual game pieces)
  • Tarot (or similar) cards - 7
  • Checkers and draughts - 7
  • Roulette - 2 (plus a roulette wheel on a cover showing lots of playing cards)
  • Dice - 2
  • Monopoly - 1

Is Plot-o Scrabble in disguise?

Dominoes

And, the 13th card of the Tarot "major arcana":

Back to playing cards

I count at least six aces

I'd like to try and propel chess back into the lead - this cover should help.

Incidentally - I never knew "Cluedo" is called "Clue" in the US. When the makers first starting shipping the game to the US, what made them decide to drop "do" from the word? Was there already copyright on the word "cluedo" in the USA?  It's a strange world that we live in.

"What made them decide to drop "do" from the word?"

I have heard that the original name of "Clue" was "Cluedo," but never why the name was changed. If I had to guess, it's because the word "Cluedo" sounds strange to american ears. Similarly, "Snakes & Ladders" was changed to "Chutes & Ladders" for probably similar reasons.

"I'd like to try and propel chess back into the lead ..."

Okay, I'll help, too.

This is from Wikipedia:

"In Canada and the U.S., the game is known as Clue. It was retitled because the traditional British board game Ludo, on which the name is based, was less well known there than its American variant Parcheesi."

From https://www.hasbro.com/common/instruct/cluemasterdetective.pdf



Jeff of Earth-J said:

"What made them decide to drop "do" from the word?"

I have heard that the original name of "Clue" was "Cluedo," but never why the name was changed. If I had to guess, it's because the word "Cluedo" sounds strange to american ears. Similarly, "Snakes & Ladders" was changed to "Chutes & Ladders" for probably similar reasons.

Each issue of Alan Moore's Fashion Beast limited series from 2012-2013 had 4 variant covers, one of which showed a Tarot card.  Here's a selection of those 10 covers.

Issue #1, "The Magician".

Issue #3, "Five of Swords".

Issue #6, "The Devil"

Issue #7, "The Fool".

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