Just thought I'd start a thread about the new graphic novel that hit shelves this week.  There are some big changes to some of the characters, but it still feels very much like Batman.  I think that, for some reason, Batman as a character can be very different (Adam West, Bill Finger, Paul Dini, Frank Miller, Dick Sprang, the Brave and the Bold comic and animated versions) and still be, really, Batman.  When JMS tried to change up Superman, it felt horribly wrong - both in his Earth One book and the Grounded storyline in the regular Superman comic.  Spider-Man kinda has strict perameters, too, to feel like Spider-Man.  But Batman can be dead serious (Nolan) or crazy, loopy ("outrageous!") and it weirdly feels OK. 

 

Anyway...here's the thread.  Go for it.  I'll add more of my thoughts later.  BUT, I think the big change to Martha Wayne's family history was kinda awesome. 

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I was going to wait on this one. I had heard enough good things that I decided to swing by the shop and pick a copy up. Batman has always been a favorite character of mine. While I've never regularly followed his series until recently I always take an opportunity to pick up his graphic novels like Long Halloween, Dark Knight Returns, and the recent Batman Noel. I'm looking forward to reading Earth One.

At first I was waiting for this one to appear on Instocktrades.com. Then I looked through it, and even though the art is pretty, I just can't bring myself to buy it. I was the same way with the Superman one. Meh. I'm just not interested in it.

Check out the excerpt from The Killing Joke in the middle of this article about Commisioner Gordon.

 

Here's what it says about Commisioner Gordon's stance at the end of his ordeal in TKJ:

 

Even after being drugged and forced to watch the desecration of his daughter, Jim still knew that the law worked. Jim wanted justice, but he wanted it done right. His commitment to what he believed was unshakable.

 

In fact here are his exact words to our friend Batman:

 

"I want him brought in... ... and I want him brought in by the book!  By the book, you hear?  We have to show him We have to show him that our way works."

 

In Batman, Earth One however, Commisioner Gordon can only become a true hero once he breaks the law, tortures information out of a suspect by beating him with a baseball bat, and then incite his colleagues and possibly impressionable officers below him in the chain of command to likewise forsake the law.

 

Good article on it here.

 

Depressing to think that Geoff Johns has no clue what Gordon meant by those words in the Killing Joke, nor any clue how hard those principles were to establish, why they were established, or how fundamental they are to a truly civilised society. 

 

Depressing and a little chilling.

 Geoff

Johns 

must 

live 

in 

a

bubble.

So what's the change to Martha Wayne's family history?

Man, remember when Geoff Johns wrote Stars and STRIPE? Seemed like he was such a bright force in comics writing. I have actually loved large percentages of what he's done in the past. But now it seems he's either over-the-top violent or just a little bit amateurish (as in JLA). Come on back to quality, Johns!

Figserello said:

Depressing and a little chilling.

 Geoff

Johns 

must 

live 

in 

a

bubble.

Figserello said:

Check out the excerpt from The Killing Joke in the middle of this article about Commisioner Gordon.

 

Here's what it says about Commisioner Gordon's stance at the end of his ordeal in TKJ:

 

Even after being drugged and forced to watch the desecration of his daughter, Jim still knew that the law worked. Jim wanted justice, but he wanted it done right. His commitment to what he believed was unshakable.

 

In fact here are his exact words to our friend Batman:

 

"I want him brought in... ... and I want him brought in by the book!  By the book, you hear?  We have to show him We have to show him that our way works."

 

In Batman, Earth Onehowever, Commisioner Gordon can only become a true hero once he breaks the law, tortures information out of a suspect by beating him with a baseball bat, and then incite his colleagues and possibly impressionable officers below him in the chain of command to likewise forsake the law.

 

Good article on it here.

 

Depressing to think that Geoff Johns has no clue what Gordon meant by those words in the Killing Joke, nor any clue how hard those principles were to establish, why they were established, or how fundamental they are to a truly civilised society. 

 

Depressing and a little chilling.

 Geoff

Johns

must

live

in

a

bubble.

Thanks for talking me out of getting this book, Figserello. I don't mind antiheroes -- heck, I've read the adventures of Jonah Hex and John Constantine since Day One -- but I do want the heroes to be heroes.

Figs and CK -- Check out Kristen Page-Kirby's thoughts about Colorado, "The Dark Knight Rises" and Jim Gordon (especially the last paragraph) here.  I thought of your exchange above when I read this over lunch.

Don't anyone show her Batman: Earth One!

Love that. I love her economy of words, too. Well put, and never once are you tempted to skim. It's all good.

Doctor Hmmm? said:

Figs and CK -- Check out Kristen Page-Kirby's thoughts about Colorado, "The Dark Knight Rises" and Jim Gordon (especially the last paragraph) here.  I thought of your exchange above when I read this over lunch.

A while back, Wizard magazine did a feature ranking the top 50 heroes in comics. No. 1 on the list was Jim Gordon. That's right -- a man with no powers, no gizmos or gimmicks beyond standard police gear, no super strength. What he does have is integrity.

Remember "No Man's Land"? Jim Gordon could have bugged out from Gotham like anyone else, but instead took his charge as an officer of the law so seriously that he stayed to protect those left behind who still needed protecting, leading a band of like-minded souls through sheer force of will. And his reward was to have The Joker murder his wife minutes before order was restored and he was reinstated.* You know he wanted to kill The Joker good and dead, to personally throttle him -- but after living through a nightmare, at great personal hardship, to establish order and prove, in word and in deed, that the system is valuable and necessary, he didn't do it. He didn't give in to the passions of the moment. Well, he did a little, in that he shot The Joker in the kneecaps, but I can't blame him for that.*

 

That's the Jim Gordon I want to read about, not this chump in "Batman: Earth One."

*I've said it before: On Earth-ClarkKent_DC, the way that story ended, after Gordon kneecapped The Joker, Harvey Bullock took the pistol and shot him full of holes. 

At the risk of opening myself to ridicule, I'll admit to the following:

1) I'll probably pick this up at some point, due to being a fan - yes, they exist - of Geoff Johns (and Gary Frank, too, btw), and

2) I have enjoyed much of what Johns has worked on, including JSA, (the Wally West) Flash, Green Lantern, Action Comics, Blackest Night, and The Thing: Freakshow.  I'm hardly from the school of "he can do no wrong", as I think his run on Avengers floundered badly, and his work with the Barry Allen Flash (despite his obvious love of the character) was disappointing at best (both Rebirth and the subsequent 12 issue series that lead into Flashpoint).  But overall I would still list him as one of my favourite writers.

Nothing wrong with that. I've enjoyed quite a bit of Johns' work myself. I won't get this, as I don't need a Batman origin. I know it.

John Dunbar said:

At the risk of opening myself to ridicule, I'll admit to the following:

1) I'll probably pick this up at some point, due to being a fan - yes, they exist - of Geoff Johns (and Gary Frank, too, btw), and

2) I have enjoyed much of what Johns has worked on, including JSA, (the Wally West) Flash, Green Lantern, Action Comics, Blackest Night, and The Thing: Freakshow.  I'm hardly from the school of "he can do no wrong", as I think his run on Avengers floundered badly, and his work with the Barry Allen Flash (despite his obvious love of the character) was disappointing at best (both Rebirth and the subsequent 12 issue series that lead into Flashpoint).  But overall I would still list him as one of my favourite writers.

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