HEROES IN CRISIS EXPANDS TO NINE ISSUES

Artists Lee Weeks and Mitch Gerads Join Tom King and Clay Mann in Revealing More Secrets of Sanctuary

Beginning September 26, Eisner Award-winner Tom King’s new limited series, HEROES IN CRISIS, introduces a new generation of readers to the concept of a “Crisis” within the DC Universe. This time, instead of a reality-ending event, this crisis is ripped from real-world headlines: How do superheroes handle PTSD? How do DC’s Trinity—Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman—handle the traumas and anxieties of fighting crime and saving the world, over and over again? And what happens when the safeguards that have been in place for years, fail?

First announced as a seven-issue series by Tom King and artist Clay Mann, HEROES IN CRISIS now expands to nine issues, with King collaborators Lee Weeks and Mitch Gerads providing art for the added issues. These issues will provide added insight into King and Mann’s epic tale, with Weeks (BATMAN/ELMER FUDD) handling art duties for issue #3 and Eisner award-winning Gerads (MISTER MIRACLE) providing art for issue #7.

HEROES IN CRISIS #1, written by Tom King, art by Clay Mann and Tomeu Morey, lettered by Clayton Cowles and edited by Jamie S. Rich and Brittany Holzherr, hits shelves September 26.

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I definitely didn't notice anything like that when I read it either. I figured it was one of those things that everyone noticed except for me. I'm one of those people who never gets what something was alluding to in a movie when I read about it on IMDB, though, so I'm kind of gullible that way.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

I read that article on CBR; it was speculation on the author's part (and honestly seemed like an attempt to gin up some outraged clicks). As far as I know, King and Mann haven't said that was to be the case. It seems like a stretch to me, given the circumstances of the deaths don't have much to do with each other.  

If anything, it's more of a visual similarity than an actual analogue.

Wandering Sensei: Moderator Man said:

I definitely didn't notice anything like that when I read it either. I figured it was one of those things that everyone noticed except for me. I'm one of those people who never gets what something was alluding to in a movie when I read about it on IMDB, though, so I'm kind of gullible that way.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

I read that article on CBR; it was speculation on the author's part (and honestly seemed like an attempt to gin up some outraged clicks). As far as I know, King and Mann haven't said that was to be the case. It seems like a stretch to me, given the circumstances of the deaths don't have much to do with each other.  

What about the other dead people in that scene? Are, say, Wally West and Steel going to get better?

That's my biggest concern (well, okay, the Wally part...don't care much about Steel). They have been dancing around Wally actually being something in the current DCU for a long while. I'm starting to wonder if they couldn't figure out how to do it properly, so they just let Tom King kill him off panel.

Captain Comics said:

What about the other dead people in that scene? Are, say, Wally West and Steel going to get better?

When you have multiple speedsters and archers at the same time, they become redundant and expendable.

"Wally West will be a greater Flash than Barry Allen!" was the mantra throughout Wally's time as THE Flash but eventually writers never believed that because they wanted to use Barry! So Wally became, repeat after me!, redundant and expendable since the newer characters that have been introduced since the 90s were younger and went for a different demographic. Too old and established to remain a sidekick but now deemed a secondary character in the Flash's world. Not the safest place to be, especially during a "Crisis"!

Yeah, I'm concerned about that too. I think the DCU is better off with characters like Wally and Roy in it. It's hard to tell a story like this in an ongoing comics universe, where even your first issues are playing a dual role as Heroes in Crisis #1 and DC Rebirth issue #500. 

I don't think the deaths are going to be off-panel forever; I expect that as the investigation continues, we'll know more, and see more.

Maybe it does not mean anything, but isn't it Wally in the cover between Batman and Superman?

My guess is it's just a misdirect, to keep people from guessing that he'd be killed. 

I wasn't around or wasn't paying attention at the time, but how did Wally die the first time? Was there a corpse then?

He was absorbed into the speed force (or maybe he was in an alternate dimension) for a while, around Infinite Crisis, which let Bart take over. So no body there. Then he came back...and I'm pretty sure he was alive through the rest of that time until the New 52 reboot -- but he'd been sidelined in favor of Barry once Barry returned during Final Crisis. 

That sounds right, Rob. It was, in fact, an alternate dimension that Wally and family were sent to in Infinite Crisis. Then, as you say, when he returned in Final Crisis he existed until New 52 wiped him from existence. But then he returned when Barry remembered him, whereupon it was revealed he'd been in the Speed Force for 10 years. His marriage to Linda and their kids are still wiped out.

Incidentally, when Wally returned he revealed that an unknown hand that had created the New 52 Earth 0, not Barry's meddling with the timeline. That was one of our first hints about what has become Doomsday Clock.

Also, we do have a time traveler (Booster Gold) in Heroes in Crisis. Might that be a reset button?

There might be a time-travel reset, for sure... but I hope it's not the solution (or not all of the solution) -- it feels a bit like a cop-out.

I'd be more amenable to learning that what we think has happened isn't quite accurate, in a sense that the AI controlling Sanctuary have decided that the people who most need a lesson about trauma are the 3 heroes who set it up. Basically a lesson that said human psychological care shouldn't be left in the hands of an AI, no matter how sophisticated. Perhaps this is a sophisticated simulation meant to teach them that lesson?

There are a few elements of the diner scene that make me question its authenticity. (Aside from a pie that "smells like America," which: arrgh.) The thing that stuck out for me was that once the fight began, all the civilians were gone. Waitress, patrons, everyone -- no one's around anymore. I also saw an article online that pointed out a ROBIN-1 license plate on the diner wall, and the suggestion of the word PERRY in a newspaper headline. And the town name is Gordon, Nebraska. The article writer on CBR suggested that the nods to Batman and Superman's supporting casts are an indication that they were behind the creation of the town. I'm not convinced by this -- it feels like a bit of a stretch in a medium where easter eggs are routinely inserted with no meaning behind them at all -- but I *am* wondering where all the patrons got to, and why we never saw them leave. 

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