This will hopefully be an insightful part of our Grant Morrison Reading Project and a continuation of my own Bat-Journey. As I gather some references and take some notes before I delve deep into the Morrisonian version of the Greater DCU, I want to look at Final Crisis Sketchbook (Jl'08) which came out the same time as FC #1. It contains, naturally, some sketches by J.G. Jones and comments by Grant Morrison in this comic book version of a DVD extra. Some highlights, note-wise:

  • Darkseid--he appears to be "ossifying" and is in great pain. He is the shadow of decay!
  • Desaad-torturer of the gods and a hidden cross-dresser. Which gives certain scenes from JLA some unintentional comic visions!
  • The Black Racer-from goofy to frightening!
  • Terrible Turpin-- "Jack Kirby as drawn by Frank Miller"
  • Orion- No longer the Dog of War but the Soldier of the New Gods. His symbol is the sun!
  • Mister Miracle-he is the same one from Seven Soldiers! I'm going to have to finish that soon!
  • Kamandi-- how does the Last Boy on Earth fit in with Kirby's Fourth World?
  • The Forever People--- from Hippies to Goth?
  • Libra- nice to know that Grant and I read the same comics as kids!!
  • The Monitors--bridging the two Crises! Cosmic soap opera!
  • Big Science Action-- Morrison's Japanese JLA. The Silver Age meets Anime!
  • Super Young Team-- interesting combinations of classic DC heroes with a modern twist but these teen heroes are annoying!

Everyone please feel free to comment on this as I want this to be, as Figs believes, the culmination of the Post Crisis DCU that deserves to be celebrated!

Next: Who is the God Destroyed? or Just the Cosmic Facts, Ma'am!

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It's not the Flash Museum, Figs... the strip club building used to house the theater where Flash was performing when he first accidentally vibrated to Earth-2. And it winds up being the setting where Barry finally returns to the world.

Metaphorically, though, I think you got the gist.

AHHH, now I get it. I actually remember this from a Grant Morrison-written story in Secret Origins (with art by Mike Parobeck... sigh) about that story. It was told in the form of a written report for school about the encounter by a young member of the audience--Gar Logan, aka Beast Boy.

Don't know if that's the first time that tale had been told or not, but I like that he tied it in that way to DCU #0.

Rob Staeger said:

It's not the Flash Museum, Figs... the strip club building used to house the theater where Flash was performing when he first accidentally vibrated to Earth-2. And it winds up being the setting where Barry finally returns to the world.

Metaphorically, though, I think you got the gist.

That's the first time that tale had been told from that point of view, Jeff, but in Flash 123, he's performing at a benefit for orphans in a theater. Morrison was elaborating on that original event.

Is this Secret Origins #50 we are talking about? I have that. I don't remember Gar Logan in it, but maybe I didn't know him then. Must dig it out. Did Morrison come up with the strip club development there?

In any case, a place where people become objects is a very obvious beachead for Darkseid's invasion of reality...

I think it may have been in that big 50th issue. And this is pre-Beast Boy Gar Logan. I just checked that story in one of my Grant Morrison Flash trades. It was also my first exposure to the Shade, who went on to greatness in Starman.

This story didn't delve into the whole strip club thing. Of course, it was told from the POV of a ten year old boy, so it was kept appropriate.

From what I remember about Secret Origins #50 was the Post-Crisis version of Flash #123 where instead of going to Earth-Two, the Barry-Flash discovers that Central City had a "twin" that vanished and everyone made to forget. Vibrating at a certain frequency (as was his thing), Barry enters Keystone City to find its citizens frozen in time for decades(?) because of the Shade, the Thinker and the Fiddler. He frees Keystone's hero the original Flash and the two defeat the villains and bring Keystone back to life!

As for Gar Logan, going to school in Central City was against his own origin where he is with his parents in Africa! 

That sounds about right, Phillip. 

And you're right, Jeff, the revelation that it became a strip club didn't happen until Final Crisis.

The cover to DC Universe #0.  It was numbered 0, originally because it was going to be called Countdown #0.  All in all, a good idea to disassociate it from that trainwreck. The less said the better on that score.

 

A variation of this cover was later used for the collected Legion of Three Worlds

 

(I presume you are ok with these images going up, Philip.  Let me know if not.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

_________________________________

 

This post is just to say that I got the hardback of Final Crisis from the library and I just finished reading it.  I got the handsome hardback version of it, as I just wanted to see how it read as one book.  It was quite dense.  Every word of dialogue and almost every square inch of the page contained something that needed to be absorbed to get the full story.  It did take me about a week to read, as I found I had to give each chapter a bit of time to sink in.  Nevertheless, the story is quite straightforward and linear, until the last issue or so anyway.  

 

Morrison goes out of his way to make the story self-contained for people who'd just pick up the book cold.  To touch on two points already mentioned: we are told everything we need to know about the Human Flame (he’s a loser from the very bottom of the pecking order who has a grudge against J’onn J’onnz) and the history of the strip club/former theatre we have been talking about above is recounted in pretty naturalistic dialogue between two of the Flashes.

 

I don’t want to pre-empt anything you have to say about the series, but I would urge anyone who is thinking of seeing how it measures up three years on to pull the issues out, or better yet, get their hands on the collected edition and give it a go.  I was hugely impressed, both by its coherence (which, like almost everyone else, I had trouble with at the time), and by the craft that went into it. 

 

Without going into the nitty-gritty, it was just a surprisingly satisfying superhero story, starring the icons.

Feel free to post any image you want, Figs! It's a big help and you have better tech than I do!

I will post on Final Crisis #1 soon. I'm trying to figure out the best structure for it (focus on each character or scene or go page by page). And explain why I subtitled it "Morrison & Me". 

Philip Portelli said:

 And explain why I subtitled it "Morrison & Me". 

I was wonderig about that! I guess you are both about the same age?  Or maybe he comes around to your house for coffee?

 

Anyway, take your time. No rush here.

Why do you think he used Libra, of all villains? ;-)
 
Figserello said:

Philip Portelli said:

 And explain why I subtitled it "Morrison & Me". 

I was wonderig about that! I guess you are both about the same age?  Or maybe he comes around to your house for coffee?

 

Anyway, take your time. No rush here.

When this came out in hardback (pretty much the instant it came out in hardback), I bought it and read it cover to cover. I thought it made sense the first time I read it, but I thought it made even more sense that way. I may take the time to reread it over spring break (starts next Thursday!) just to enjoy spotting and discovering new New Gods appearances throughout the DC Universe. I know that Grant Morrison is a bit meta-textual for some people, but he says so much about how our lives are formed by stories in these pages, plus lots of nice little super-hero elements throughout.

I love the way it feels like Earth is in shambles and even the super-heroes and super-villains are confused and disjointed. It creates a nice "confusion" amongst the cast, who are only dealing with what is in front of them. Unlike too many big team-ups where everyone faces the bad guy at once, everyone is facing different problems, different villains, and different situations.

Bring it on!

Figserello said:

This post is just to say that I got the hardback of Final Crisis from the library and I just finished reading it.  I got the handsome hardback version of it, as I just wanted to see how it read as one book.  It was quite dense.  Every word of dialogue and almost every square inch of the page contained something that needed to be absorbed to get the full story.  It did take me about a week to read, as I found I had to give each chapter a bit of time to sink in.  Nevertheless, the story is quite straightforward and linear, until the last issue or so anyway. 

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