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I read about the first year of Alias at the time, intrigued by seeing Bendis approach the crime fiction he made his independent reputation on with mainstream comics production values. I'm probably one of the few readers who was put off when he started bringing in elements from the Marvel universe, which had mostly been deep background at first.

So most of the Luke Cage references I know only from seeing discussions about them online. Still really enjoying the show. I like the sly way they're bringing in the superpowers. I think I'm three episodes in.

We've seen episodes 1 thru 7 so far. I really liked the title "The Sandwich Saved Me."

So, I've made it through episode 7, and I'm pretty much hooked.

* I'm loving how we're getting to the see Jessica at both her best and worst.

* I think I was expecting more super hero cameos, but I'm not missing them.

* Shame about Ruben

* I didn't even recognize Rebecca De Mornay

* Kilgrave is quite the bastard.

* FYI, while Tennant doesn't use the purple makeup, he does sport a purple suit

END

The other day we finished the remaining episodes. You won't be disappointed.

I just changed the title of this thread because I found out that a second season is in the works.

Luke Cage took a prominent part in at least 2 other storylines -- the first during Len Wein's run featuring the Wrecking Crew; then, during Steve Gerber's run, aside from the Sons of the Serpent, he also took part in the Headmen/Nebula storyline, and was thus possibly the most recurring of the irregular members during the first 40 issues of the series.

Luis Olavo de Moura Dantas said:

I wish they had chosen another name for that series.  Marvel Knights would be more accurate, at least.

Oddly, IIRC Iron Fist is one of a very few 1970s heroes that has never been a Defender or even a Secret Defender. Unless one counts that zany three-issue storyline which had dozens of try-outs, and where Iron Fist decided becoming a Defender was not worth the trouble... that was, IIRC, the one and only time Danny made as much as a cameo appearance in the book.  Even Dracula has more of a claim of being a Defender!

Daredevil participated in a grand total of three Defenders storylines, by my count: the Giant Size where he cheated Grandmaster, the Sons of the Serpent storyline (where he first met Luke Cage), and, the Mandrill story.  His only other appearances where a couple of Matt Murdock cameos as Nighthawk's lawyer and that time when he attended Valkyrie's funeral.  He was a peripheral member, and a very occasional one at that.

Luke Cage was instrumental in the Sons of the Serpent story and also attended Valkyrie's funeral - and that was that, IIRC.

Jessica Jones did not even exist at the time the stories were actually published.

So it is an odd group to call Defenders.  Patsy Walker, of course, is a Defenders mainstay.  I wonder if she will be featured in that series.

Hadn't read any of the comics featuring Jessica Jones so I didn't have much idea what to expect from the tv series, but binge-watched it with a friend and really enjoyed it.  Killgrave was at  once charming and despicable and frightening as hell!  Although Jim Shooter used him well during his run on Daredevil, the Purple Man had never been a prominent villain in the Marvel Universe during the Silver or Bronze ages, but as depicted in this series he always had the potential, although the actions of both Killgrave and Jessica Jones go far beyond what would have been acceptable in mainstream comics of the '60s or even '70s.  Hmm, if Jessica had murdered someone while under control of the Purple Man in any Marvel Comics published during Shooter's reign as editor, would he have insisted that she had to pay the ultimate price for her actions despite having no control over them?

 I actually liked the low-key super-heroics of the series, playing up horror/suspense elements instead.

If I haven't already said it, I never understood why the Silver Age Purple Man was considered just another weak Daredevil villain. His power, used imaginatively, was always mind-blowing (pun intended).

Killgrave really does have a frightening power, but it was his limitations as a man -- no imagination, no ambition -- that made him a minor villain. Even so, he did horrible things casually, just on a minor scale. ("Give me your car. Go kill yourself.") I think the show demonstrated that ably as well.

And the show made us care about the characters enough that even though Killgrave wasn't going to conquer the world, we were afraid of what he was going to do to Jessica & Co. A casual word or phrase would kill them horribly. And there was really no stopping him -- anybody on the street could be acting on his orders, and no one would bar him entry anywhere.

The show was also a huge metaphor for PTSD and/or domestic violence. That's pretty ambitious for a television show that doesn't even measure ratings!

P.S. I didn't recognize Rebecca DeMornay either, Randy, and I had a huge crush on her after Risky Business!

Excellent analysis, Captain!  In his debut, in DD #6, I think, Kilgrave was almost laughably inane, but then so were many other villains of the early Marvel years, even those with considerable powers.  Later writers, of the late '70s onwards, would take many of these minor villains and manage to weave very interesting stories around them, as was done in Jessica Jones with the Purple Man.  Fortunately Kilgrave had limited ambitions as someone with that sort of power could have unleashed the sort of horrors to make WWII seem like a minor fracas in comparison.  As it was, the series did a great job of depicting the sort of carnage he was able to commit even on a small scale, destroying or permanently scarring many lives, such as Jessica's, with his powers and petty obsessions.  One of the worst sort of stalkers.  A charming monster with a handsome face.  Too many real life comparisons, even if they lacked the magic power.

Captain Comics said:

Killgrave really does have a frightening power, but it was his limitations as a man -- no imagination, no ambition -- that made him a minor villain. Even so, he did horrible things casually, just on a minor scale. ("Give me your car. Go kill yourself.") I think the show demonstrated that ably as well.

And the show made us care about the characters enough that even though Killgrave wasn't going to conquer the world, we were afraid of what he was going to do to Jessica & Co. A casual word or phrase would kill them horribly. And there was really no stopping him -- anybody on the street could be acting on his orders, and no one would bar him entry anywhere.

The show was also a huge metaphor for PTSD and/or domestic violence. That's pretty ambitious for a television show that doesn't even measure ratings!

P.S. I didn't recognize Rebecca DeMornay either, Randy, and I had a huge crush on her after Risky Business!

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