Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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The Move went thru several line-ups and style changes.  The EP SOMETHING ELSE FROM THE MOVE has them doing a live set at The Marquee, and they';re do some fantastic rock & roll.  The album MOVE (1968), despite some aggressive disinsterest on the part of some friends of mine who've heard it, really does remind me a lot of OUT OF THE BLUE, except with "studio strings" instead of an actual band string section.  The evolution, as with most bands of the 60's, is fast & meteoric, and continues thru their non-album singles. By the time of their 2nd album, SHAZAM, 2 of their 5 original members have left, replaced by Rick Price.  SHAZAM is like a more "progressive" version of REVOLVER-- every song sounds like it could be a different band.  I consider it a MASTERPIECE.  After this, Roy did his first solo album, but somhow, BOULDERS (on which he played every single instrument) was not released until 3 years later, which can cause some confusion in understanding the "evolution".

Allow me to back track a bit here... The earliest stuff I have by these guys is BIRMINGHAM BEAT, a collection of 14 songs by Mike Sheridan & The Nightriders.  Thing Birmingham's answer to The Beatles, except they never made it big.  halfway thru, Roy Wood joins, and quickly begins writing & singing. Mike decided to quit, and 5 guys from 4 bands (if I get this right) decided they needed to do something drastic, if they were ever going to make it big.  and so, The Move was formed.  Funny thing... the 3 remaining members of The Nightriders hired a new front man... Jeff Lynne.  Then they changed their name to The Idle Race.  The Move became HUGE in England, but never made it in America.  The Idle Race never made it in England!  Despite 2 albums and sevewral singles, tons of great press, nothing really sold.  Damn shame.  The music Jeff Lynne did with these guys (he was main writer, singer AND producer!) is comparable to The Move material from the same time, although with more of a combination "fairy tale" and "Victorian music hall" sound.

So for the 2nd time, Roy Wood invited Jeff Lynne to join him, and he agreed, provided they start a new band-- Electric Light Orchestra.  He went for it, but the record label BEGGED them not to change the name "for commercial reasons".  therefore, one COULD say (in theory) that LOOKING ON was actually the 1st "ELO" album... except it was listed as The Move.  I think (apart from the single "Brontosaurus") it was some of the CRAZIEST, weirdest stuff either of those 2 guys ever did.  Really demented, out there. The follow-up was much better-- MESSAGE FROM THE COUNTRY.  For God's sake, get the UK version.  On the US version they took the same 10 songs and shuffled them like a deck of cards, totally ruining it.  Their 3rd album was finally titled ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA (or, "NO ANSWER" in America-- go figure).  So you see, it wasn't REALLY the "1st" ELO album, in a way, it was the 3rd.  Everybody confused?  Good.

The last Move single was "California Man" / "Do Ya".  Wow.

And then Roy QUIT, leaving it in Jeff's hands, and formed Wizzard.  Wizzard got HUGE in England!!! -- but was unheard of in America.  Jeff's version of ELO took quite a while to have real success... but over a succession of albums, their following on both sides of the Atlantic built and built. Looking back, I find it funny that probably their biggest success(the point I started buying) was when their sound had finally come full circle so they were doing "pop" songs just as they had been in '67-'68 again.  Isn't that nuts?

Oh yes, there's also the BBC Radio album of Move songs, many of which were from the MOVE album, except, without the studio strings, and it's a toss-up which I like better.  Definitely harder-hitting as "simple" rock & roll, without the "classical" flourishes added in.

My top 3 60's bands for some time have been -- in order-- The Monkees, The Move, The Beatles.  Yeah!

Now how did a music discussion get into the "Movies" thread?  (heeheehee)

Philip Portelli said:

I saw STAR TREK: NEMESIS when it came out in December 2002. It wasn't bad but added too many ideas like a sister planet for Romulus, naturally called Remus and another Soong android B-4. Also there was cloning, telepathic assault, a wedding and the feeling that everyone was getting a bit old for this!

Also they put it out five days before THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS, killing any chance of a good box office. Star Trek deserved a better end.

 

Romulus' twin planet Remus was there from the very start. It was shown in "Balance of Terror," where the Romulans first appeared.

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HALLOWEEN  (1978)
HALLOWEEN 6:  THE CURSE OF MICHAEL MYERS   (1995)


I never watched these 2 back-to-back before.  The "producer's cut" (before it was totally bastardized into the "director's cut" for theatrical release) was a much-better-made film than it deserved to be, because the story was S***.  The director apparently wasn't satisfied with that, so he cut 20 or so minutes out of the film and added 20 or so new minutes, in the process turning the entire film into garbage, and making the plot make NO sense at all. A shame, as there were a few actors I liked in there whose time and talent were completely wasted.

HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER

I felt like watching something else with Mitchell Ryan in it after last night... he became my favorite character on DHARMA AND GREG.

...I saw the 3-D FINDING NEMO...Which was terriffic ! Really , seemed maybe better this time around ! Great .

  Henry , I assume you mean Halloween 6 ?

DEATH ON THE NILE  (1978)

EVIL UNDER THE SUN  (1982)

...I didn't get up the fact that I saw a Thursday nite " recent past classics/goodies " series ( Hosted by the owner of my LCS !!!!!!!!! ) , at the local " big " multiplex , of 2007's INTO THE WILD , directed by Sean Penn (who presumably might have played the lead during his younger years) .

  Then , last nite , at a " weekend midnite shows " series the othert theater(s) here in SC run , this one a bit more aimed at the local college crowd I suppose , I saw Tarentino's PULP FICTION , which I never had seen before .

The Cocoanuts (1929)

I really want to see that one. It looks very intense.

George Poague said:

END OF WATCH. A riveting L.A. cop drama, somewhat reminiscent of others in the genre -- Colors, Dark Blue, and Training Day, which had the same writer -- but still worth seeing. Only problem: every character has his or her own video camera, so the whole movie is shot in the "shaky cam" style we know from Blair Witch Project and other films that ape the look of documentaries or reality TV. If you can get over that, it's a tough, exciting film.

I saw Looper while on vacation last week. It's a very good time travel flick with Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis. Very well made with some intense scenes. Gordon-Levitt has some makeup to make him look like Bruce Willis, it's a little goofy at first but is made alright because he also nails some Bruce mannerisms, you can tell he did his homework.

I've heard that th Scientologists tend to be fairly litigious.

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