Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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I just posted the cover of the Classics Illustrated adaptation of The Red Badge of Courage. Audie Murphy played the main character in the movie. I just saw him playing Jimmy Stewart's younger criminal brother in the movie Night Passage.

The whole movie is available to watch for free on YouTube. If the subtitles don't appear as you're watching, click on the closed captioning. 

Detective 445 said:



Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

Have you seen Andrei Tarkovsky's movie Stalker? I saw it last summer, and MAN, are there some incredible similarities. It feels like certain shots were lifted directly from that movie. 

I haven't seen that yet. I'll see if I can track it down.

Not exactly a movie, but we started watching the first of the Mickey Mouse color cartoons yesterday with "The Band Concert" from 1936. I had the opportunity to see it on the big screen many years ago, and it remains among my three favorite color cartoons of the era (the other two being Popeye Meets Sinbad the Sailor and Popeye and Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves).

We've previously watched all of the b&w Mickey Mouse cartoons twice and all of the b&w Popeye cartoons twice. When is Warner Bros. ever going to release a complrehesive set of their eraly work?

Also, I am reminded f my "hatred" of Leonard Maltin. He introduces (i.e., "apologises for") these cartoons on each of the discs and his intro cannot be skipped over. We've tried muting in the past. Yesterday we fast forwarded; that's allowed.

Richard Willis said:

I just posted the cover of the Classics Illustrated adaptation of The Red Badge of Courage. Audie Murphy played the main character in the movie.

I saw that years ago. It's a good movie, I think.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

When is Warner Bros. ever going to release a comprehesive set of their early work?

Are there rights issues? The earlier ones were productions of Leon Schesinger Productions.

I think you probably have to blame lawyers for Leonard Maltin's little "bits"

I know, but if I ever meet him face to face I'll probably punch him in the nose.

I haven't seen it in a long time. I remember that it was a faithful adaptation. Casting most-decorated war hero Murphy as a guy who runs away was inspired casting. Maybe it was his idea?

Luke Blanchard said:

Richard Willis said:

I just posted the cover of the Classics Illustrated adaptation of The Red Badge of Courage. Audie Murphy played the main character in the movie.

I saw that years ago. It's a good movie, I think.

Had my annual Good Friday viewing of Life of Brian and The Passion of the Christ.

Brian is my favorite movie about religion.  Passion, while well-made, is an oddly soulless picture.

"We're all individuals!"

We've watched a grab-bag of things lately, like:

Gun Crazy (1950): imagine Bonnie and Clyde set in 1950, with most of the blame falling to Bonnie.Predictable, but passable.

The Journey of Natty Gann (1985): an unusual Disney film from the 80s. A girl and a wolf head across the country in the 1930s to be with her father. The main characters have a Family Movie Force-Field protecting them from being too seriously harmed, but the background depiction of the Depression feels very real and often dangerous.

Loving Vincent (2017): a fascinating, painted film exploring the last days of Van Gogh.

The Theory of Everything (2014):  The Hawking biopic is incredibly well acted . It's a tad cleaned up, but well worth seeing, especially now.

Victim (1961): Allegedly the first mainstream English-language movie to use the word "homosexual," and it's a progressive film for its time. Police, aided by a lawyer with some gay leanings, try to stop someone who is blackmailing gay men in an area of London inhabited almost entirely by red herrings.

Godzilla vs the Easter Bunny (1971): When a radioactive rabbit attacks Tokyo, the Big G. comes to the rescue. Famous for the scene where he bites the ears first.

Okay, I made that last one up.



The Baron said:

Brian is my favorite movie about religion.  Passion, while well-made, is an oddly soulless picture.

"If I ever meet him face to face I'll probably punch him in the nose."

I am strictly non-violent and, for the record, I would never punch Leonard Maltin in the nose.

I am sick and tired of his little "apologies," though.

I love Life of Brian, but it was none too popular here in the Bible Belt. JD, I nearly busted a gut in the "individuals" scene. "We are all individuals" is contradictory on its face, followed by the one guy who says "I'm not," saying he is not an individual by being an individual, being the one guy who didn't follow the crowd in saying "we are all individuals." That's just brilliant writing.

"... an area of London inhabited almost entirely by red herrings." Hahahaha! That's brilliant writing, too!

My wife and I have been inundated with Peak TV, so we haven't seen any movies lately. I will contribute by asking a question.

We have twice tried to get through Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Both times we got a little bored (and tired) and went to bed. My question is: Does it get better? Is there a reason to try a third time when there's so much material out there I know I will like?

It should be noted that we have seen no Harry Potter movies, nor read any Harry Potter books. (Unless you count Vertigo's Books of Magic, which covers much the same ground.) Beasts seems a pleasant enough fantasy movie for children, but we found it lacking for adults. Is it something more and we just haven't gotten far enough along? We were trying to watch it because a sequel is out this year, but maybe it's just a franchise too far for us.

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