Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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I have a T-shirt that reads "Han Shot First."

I think the lack of lines in the 1970s may be attributable to what I said in my previous post. The theaters didn't care if you went into the theater in the last part of the movie (which I did one year because I missed the announcements of daylight savings time). Also, there was no concern on the part of the theater of someone seeing second movies they hadn't paid for. There were virtually no theaters with more than one screen. If you showed up and bought a ticket you could choose to go in whenever you wanted, so no line waiting to go in.

I can’t remember exactly when I saw Star Wars but it was during its first run.

I don’t remember how much publicity there was or if there were lines, but I do remember seeing a poster for it in the lobby when I saw Wizards.  That I do remember.  I’m pretty sure I went with my brother and we saw it in a theater in Greece (Rochester) NY.  That theater is now a U- Haul store.  Wizards came out in February, so I was aware of Star Wars before it opened.  

KREE/SKRULL WAR:

“I remembered being disappointed in the ending back when I read it originally. Not only was Avengers #97 not drawn by Neal Adams like the other chapters…”

I think it depends on what your think of as “The Kree/Skrull War.” If you think of it as Avengers #93-97, then yes, the Buscema chapter sticks out, but the beginnings of the story go as far back as issue #89. “Story arc” is not a term that was used in those days (and is misused today more often than not, AFAIAC), but I consider the Kree/Skrull arc to be issues #89-100. If you look at it that way, Neal Adams is one of many talented artists including John Buscema, Sal Buscema Tom Palmer and Barry Windsor Smith to have contributed to the arc. Best of all, the entire arc (as I define the term) is contained in a single MMW volume.

STAR WARS:

I remember waiting a seemingly interminable time for it to even come to a theater in my town (which had only five screens at the time). St. Louis theaters got it first, and I checked the newspaper every weekend only to read, “Held Over Third Week,” “Held Over Fourth Week.” Eventually I asked my grandmother to drive me to a theater in St. Louis county. I was so embarrassed to be seen with my grandmother I made her wait outside while I saw the movie. (Yeah, yeah… I know.)

The very first Star Wars merchandise I ever sought out and acquired were four posters from Burger Chef. Each one depicted some aspect of the movie plus a descriptive paragraph of text. I remember the first one described the Empire’s new weapon, the “Death Star.” It depicted two Imperial Storm troopers firing a laser rifle mounted on a tripod. In the background loomed the Death Star. The only thing on the poster that looked like a weapon to me was that gun, and I assumed that that was the “Death Star”!

After the movie finally came to town, “Darth Vader” was to appear at a local shopping mall. I was so excited. The only thing I had for him to autograph was the soundtrack album on vinyl. When I got there and saw the costume was crap (I mean, really crap, such as a tape recorder hanging around his neck), I was so embarrassed I slinked out a side exit.

I bought the paperback adaptation through the Scholastic Book Club. A cover blurb proclaimed: “STAR WARS: From ‘The Adventures of Luke Skywalker’.” I had only recently discover “The Foundation Trilogy” (which was a trilogy back then) and “The Dune Trilogy” (which was a trilogy back then). For all I knew, there was a series of books known as “The Adventures of Luke Skywalker.” A trip to the library disabused me of that notion. The poor librarian didn’t have a clue what I was talking about.

I remember "The Adventures of Luke Skywalker" tagline, too. Then again, George Lucas would later say the movies were really about Darth Vader so more books about Luke might have been originally planned then dropped.

STRANGERS IN PARADISE: FIVE YEARS #1: The world is on a five year countdown to Armageddon. Given that Strangers in Paradise XXV #10 started the clock, I thought this series might skip ahead to “five years later,” but no, it picks up immediately after SiP #10 and will apparently chronicle those critical next five years. It’s a good jumping on point for new readers (Terry Moore does a good job of recapping SiP XXV), but you’re going to want to pick up the collection of the previous series after reading #1 of this one.

Just read The Green Lantern #7, which had fun with the idea that Myrwhydden has been trapped in Green Lantern's ring since sometime in the Broome/Kane days.

Actually, that doesn't make sense, because Hal's ring isn't the original -- not only was the original destroyed sometime in the '80s or '90s (which should have destroyed Myrwhydden), but his replacement ring has also been destroyed, and currently Hal doesn't have a physical ring: He creates a light construct ring out of will power. I'm not sure he even needs a ring any more, as he exerts the green energy by his will alone and may be completely made up of the stuff. I don't remember the details, so someone who has read Green Lantern more closely than me can correct me. Morrison seems to be writing the book as if that stuff didn't happen, it seems to me.

I also don't remember the original 1960s Myrwhydden with any detail, either, so if Morrison made some clever bits riffing on it, they were lost on me.

It was a cute story, and it's no surprise that the manifestation of the ring's AI is a hot chick. I don't know if that's Hal's idea or the ring's idea of what Hal would want, but either way it makes sense.

I also read The Wild Storm #1-13, which is a sort of parallel-world take by Warren Ellis on the original Wildstorm Universe, which is ironic, given that Ellis was one of the original architects (with his take on The Authority). We're getting alt-versions of the Khera/Daemonite conflict, most of the members of The Authority (who are not yet a team), most members of the WildC.A.T.s, and so forth. There are some missing, and some new guys I haven't seen before. This version is far more coherent, with more characters sharing origins, than before. That keeps a more coherent narrative, which is a singular one in which three different factions (I.O., Stormwatch and a group of outsiders headed by Emp) heading for a showdown. I'm engaged, but had to quit because I don't have The Wild Storm #14. Since the DC Universe service has the series up to #12, I'm hoping that they'll be up to #14 in two months which, coincidentally, is when the 24th and last issue of The Wild Storm will ship. So maybe I'll finish up then.

It's not like I have a dearth of stuff to read in the meantime. I feel overwhelmed most of the time!

GREEN LANTERN #7: This issue reminded me very much of Alan Moore’s “weird art” issue of Swamp Thing. Some of what I was going to say has been rendered inert by Cap’s post above (which also makes me think I didn’t get everything from the story I should have), so I’ll leave it at that.

PAPER GIRLS #28: This comic issue is unique. Full stop. The girls have become separated in time and space, and their stories are told in four tiered “widescreen” panels per page. The script is structured in such a way that it can be read front to back across each tier or in the conventional sense. In other words, panel one of page five (let us say) leads not only into panel two of page five, but panel one of page six. Similarly, panel three of page eight leads into both panel four of page eight as well as panel three of page nine. And so on. It reminds me somewhat of the “poster” issue of Alan Moore’s Promethea (him again), which could be read as a comic book or as a double-page poster. I would recommend Paper Girls #28 to anyone interested in experimental storytelling (but if you’re not reading the series regularly, boy are you gonna be confused!).

OTHER: Every once in a while I throw myself into a second or third tier series and just read it. Sometimes it is a series I’ve read before, other times not. I’ve been in the mood to do that again, but I’m having trouble deciding which series to read. Over the weekend I read the first issues of Speedball, New Warriors, Star Brand, Quasar and Nova.



Captain Comics said:

I also read The Wild Storm #1-13, which is a sort of parallel-world take by Warren Ellis on the original Wildstorm Universe


I've been enjoying this one as well. And not only does it feature newer (and better) versions of these characters, but the spinoff Michael Cray (Deathblow) series features alternate versions of various DCU characters.

IIRC, Marv Wolfman said that he was going to kill off Myrwhydden during the Crisis but didn't. He would have been a perfect choice but no, let's take out Mirror Master and Clayface instead!

I've been reading this series in collected form (like everything else), so I am really looking forward to encountering this issue.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

PAPER GIRLS #28: This comic issue is unique. Full stop. The girls have become separated in time and space, and their stories are told in four tiered “widescreen” panels per page. The script is structured in such a way that it can be read front to back across each tier or in the conventional sense. In other words, panel one of page five (let us say) leads not only into panel two of page five, but panel one of page six. Similarly, panel three of page eight leads into both panel four of page eight as well as panel three of page nine. And so on. It reminds me somewhat of the “poster” issue of Alan Moore’s Promethea (him again), which could be read as a comic book or as a double-page poster. I would recommend Paper Girls #28 to anyone interested in experimental storytelling (but if you’re not reading the series regularly, boy are you gonna be confused!).

STAR BRAND: When Marvel started up their “New Universe” in 1986, I decided to try one (one issue, not one series). I chose Star*Brand by Jim Shooter and John Romita, Jr. It was all right, kind of derivative of Green Lantern, but nothing I needed to collect. When John Byrne took over I bought his first issue (#11), but by #12 I had lost interest. Back in the ‘90s, my then-LCS opened up its legendary back room for a quarter sale. Among many (many) other comics, I bought the remaining issues of Star*Brand (the series lasted 19 issues plus one annual) but never read them.

Over the weekend I read the “Milestone” edition of issue #1, then remembered that #11-19 were included in one of the John Byrne “omnibus” editions. His first issue was typical Byrne: he took the concept, distilled it to what worked and threw away the rest. I don’t know if it was by accident of design (because I still haven’t read them), but issues #2-10 were rife with inconsistencies. I do know that Shooter and Romita didn’t stay on the title all that long, but I lost interest and dropped the series with issue #12.

It changed radically after that. I’m not going to go into depth about a series that 30+ years old unless someone wants to discuss it, but a lot of the groundwork for themes Byrne would later explore in John Byrne’s Next Men was laid here. It also foreshadowed the dark TV miniseries Torchwood: Miracle Day as well as developments in other comics series such as Miracleman and Maximortal. The series became dystopian after the city of Pittsburgh was destroyed, but Byrne pulled it out of its depressing downward spiral by the last issue.

MARVEL BOY: Last night I read the Marvel Boy stories from Marvel Boy #1-2 and Astonishing #3-5. This short run of issues illustrates a phenomenon of 1950s era comics in general (and Marvel comics in particular) in which a title would morph from genre to genre (in this case, super-hero to science fiction to horror) casting about for an audience. The last time I read this run I followed it into Agents of Atlas; this time I intent to follow it into Quasar.

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