Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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You'd never guess what I'm reading so I'll just tell you: Deathmate.

NICE!

Jeff of Earth-J said:

You'd never guess what I'm reading so I'll just tell you: Deathmate.

Just finished the 2nd volume of Iron Fist's Masterworks. Claremont did a good job turning just a bunch of stories from all the writers who wrote him in Marvel Premiere (Roy Thomas, Len Wein, Doug Moench and Tony Isabella) into the type of book that we were used to getting from Marvel back then. Part of me seems to think that Marvel had already decided to give Iron Fist his own book and hired Claremont and Byrne to begin the series storytelling process in Marvel Premiere and then carry it over into Iron Fist. You can read the difference when reading one issue after the other.

Good stuff!

I was just about to start reading Charles Burns' The Hive, when I noticed that it was the second part of a trilogy. Don't know how I missed that when I ordered it for the library, but fortunately I had also ordered X'ed Out, so I read that today! Burns sure does surreal well. I'd have to say I'm glad I didn't buy the book, though, because $19.95 for twenty minutes or so of reading is pretty steep. X'ed Out is mostly set up--or so it seemed to me--so I'm glad I'll be able to move on to The Hive tomorrow.

Mark,

I'm pretty sure that somewhere I have the first IronFist/PowerMan Essential in Black and White...but I've never sat down to read it through.  Now, I understand there have been at least two volumes of Iron Fist masterworks published.

Can you help me identify: 1) How much of that second Masterworks I might already have... and

2) if I would need to read the first Masterworks to understand anything going on in the 2nd one.

I am considering picking up the second Masterworks, based upon your praise,  particularly because I enjoy most books drawn by John Byrne, and I understand he was evolving his creative partnership with Claremont that leads into the X-men book of the times.

I'm not a big fan of Iron Fist, except that he was a guestar in Namor when they (Byrne) brought him back from the dead, and I've been following him as part of the "New Avengers" as Bendis has written him.  Otherwise, I don't know a lot on him.



Mark Stanislawski said:

Just finished the 2nd volume of Iron Fist's Masterworks. Claremont did a good job turning just a bunch of stories from all the writers who wrote him in Marvel Premiere (Roy Thomas, Len Wein, Doug Moench and Tony Isabella) into the type of book that we were used to getting from Marvel back then. Part of me seems to think that Marvel had already decided to give Iron Fist his own book and hired Claremont and Byrne to begin the series storytelling process in Marvel Premiere and then carry it over into Iron Fist. You can read the difference when reading one issue after the other.

Good stuff!

That is the reason I initially passed on X'ed Out (still haven't read it). It was just to steep of a price for a 56 page book that is only part of the story.

Mark Sullivan said:

I was just about to start reading Charles Burns' The Hive, when I noticed that it was the second part of a trilogy. Don't know how I missed that when I ordered it for the library, but fortunately I had also ordered X'ed Out, so I read that today! Burns sure does surreal well. I'd have to say I'm glad I didn't buy the book, though, because $19.95 for twenty minutes or so of reading is pretty steep. X'ed Out is mostly set up--or so it seemed to me--so I'm glad I'll be able to move on to The Hive tomorrow.

Good to know that the follow-up to X-ed Out is now available.

 

I read X-ed Out from the library.  Wonderfully unique and weird and disturbing, but yes, short and inclusive for such a weighty tome. 

 

Some people complain that we don't talk enough about less mainstream books like these, but what is there to say?  The creator gets down on the page exactly what he wants to say, freaky and distasteful as it is, (but I love it), and we 'get it' as we read it.  The creator is in total control of what they are doing, and that's that!

I have to disagree with you on this, Figs. The discussion group hosted by the Heroes comic store has had very spirited discussions of two similar works (among others, but those are the ones I attended): Chris Ware’s epic Jimmy Corrigan, and Ice Haven by Daniel Clowes. There's quite a lot we could talk about, if we were so inclined. A lot harder to get rolling online, I daresay, plus there's the usual participation problem.


Figserello said:

Some people complain that we don't talk enough about less mainstream books like these, but what is there to say?  The creator gets down on the page exactly what he wants to say, freaky and distasteful as it is, (but I love it), and we 'get it' as we read it.  The creator is in total control of what they are doing, and that's that!

So that was a live discussion amongst 'real people'? 

 

Yeah, my point is a bit flippant, I'll admit.  I suppose a lot of criticism on this board lies in pointing out mistakes and poorly thought-through or executed sequences, or in showing how certain points agree or not with other continuity.  Good standalone Indie books generally don't lend themselves to that approach.

 

I suppose I'm really saying that I know by looking at something like 'X-ed out' that it's a fine piece of work, but if you asked my to explain that, I'd be pretty stumped!  One way would be to show why each frame works, and who wants to have that discussion?

 

But I see how 'Jimmy Corrigan' would work well in a 'book club' setting where a group read it with a view to having something to say about it later.  As would most good 'indie' books, come to that.

 

But it still looks like the surrealism and viscereal body horror of something like 'X-ed Out' is its own point, that doesn't need much exegesis, if you see what I mean...?

Kirk,

The 2nd Masterworks covers Iron Fist 3-15 and Marvel Team-Up 63 and 64. Without looking it up, I believe Iron Fist went into the Power Man book after Marvel Team-Up.

You don't NEED to read the first Masterworks to understand what's going on but, as I pointed out, the stories are always referencing what happened in previous issues. Marvel did this a lot in the '70's and '80's. It keeps you less confused but at the same time, without reading the issue, you're not sure exactly what happened.

I like all of Marvel's Martial Arts characters and am especially fond of The White Tiger. Iron Fist never really became popular and I think it's because you can't relate to him. But for pure entertainment and clean art that's not hard on the eyes, Iron Fist had it.

Kirk G said:

Mark,

I'm pretty sure that somewhere I have the first IronFist/PowerMan Essential in Black and White...but I've never sat down to read it through.  Now, I understand there have been at least two volumes of Iron Fist masterworks published.

Can you help me identify: 1) How much of that second Masterworks I might already have... and

2) if I would need to read the first Masterworks to understand anything going on in the 2nd one.

I am considering picking up the second Masterworks, based upon your praise,  particularly because I enjoy most books drawn by John Byrne, and I understand he was evolving his creative partnership with Claremont that leads into the X-men book of the times.

I'm not a big fan of Iron Fist, except that he was a guestar in Namor when they (Byrne) brought him back from the dead, and I've been following him as part of the "New Avengers" as Bendis has written him.  Otherwise, I don't know a lot on him.



Mark Stanislawski said:

Just finished the 2nd volume of Iron Fist's Masterworks. Claremont did a good job turning just a bunch of stories from all the writers who wrote him in Marvel Premiere (Roy Thomas, Len Wein, Doug Moench and Tony Isabella) into the type of book that we were used to getting from Marvel back then. Part of me seems to think that Marvel had already decided to give Iron Fist his own book and hired Claremont and Byrne to begin the series storytelling process in Marvel Premiere and then carry it over into Iron Fist. You can read the difference when reading one issue after the other.

Good stuff!

So today I read Charles Burns' The Hive. I was wrong about X'ed Out being set-up: they both read like sections of a bigger work. There are two interwoven narratives in both books, between protagonist Doug's "real life" and the underground fantasy world. And here's one of those discussion questions: is the underground world all a dream? It's set up that way, as the opening of the story shows him in his fantasy persona, face looking like the cartoon mask he wears when he performs. "The part where I wake up and don't know where I am." If it is a dream, it's an elaborate, extended one. One problem with trying to discuss details would be the lack of page numbers or chapter divisions! I could hold up the book and point, but this is radio.

Hmmm!  Sounds like the surrealism and body horror might be in service to a larger story then...  I look forward to reading it.

 

And there's a lot to be said for scans in online comics discussions, although they are time-consuming to prepare...

 

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