Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Essential Capt. America Vol. 5. Kirby's 1976 return to Cap. While disparaged at the time by fanboys as "corny" and "old-fashioned," these stories hold up better than some of the era's more highly regarded (and pretentious) series. They're more tightly focused than Jack's stories during his last couple of years at DC.

And "Captain America's Bicentennial Battles" is some sort of masterpiece.
Started Jack of Fables Vol. 7: The New Adventures of Jack and Jack. The first issue is a one-shot about Jack's days in the jungle with a bunch of talking monkey Fables (sorry, I meant talking apes). Got to love ape comics, and they're even on the cover. Nice sly reference to Winnie The Pooh, too. The title arc resumes the story of these characters post-Literals. Interesting that Jack and Gary have only vague memories of the world before, while Jack Frost and Robin Page remember everything. I guess it's because they were actually present for the final battle. Continuing my somewhat chronological tour through Vertigo miniseries, I started The Last One by J.M. DeMatteis and Dan Sweetman. It's another beautifully painted mystical DeMatteis story, but as usual it pales in comparison to the brilliant Moonshadow.

1993 was also the year that Vertigo published Grant Morrison's Sebastian O, so I should be getting to that soon. Anybody interested in discussing that over in the Morrison thread?
Finished these. Are they really serious about turning Jack Horner into a dragon permanently? I can see how it could get hard to continue featuring the obnoxious blowhard, but that's a pretty radical way of dealing with it. Jack Frost has a good first adventure, so that's hopeful. I never did warm up to The Last One, but I still think it's admirable that Vertigo published it early on. They really were pretty open to experimentation: I can't imagine them publishing it now in this form, although possibly as an OGN.
1993 was also the year that Vertigo published Grant Morrison's Sebastian O, so I should be getting to that soon. Anybody interested in discussing that over in the Morrison thread?

Me, for one. I dug it out and read it for the first time yesterday. Looking forward to hearing what you think of it, Mark.

Continuing my somewhat chronological tour through Vertigo miniseries, I started The Last One by J.M. DeMatteis and Dan Sweetman. It's another beautifully painted mystical DeMatteis story, but as usual it pales in comparison to the brilliant Moonshadow.

I know Moonshadow created ripples when it was first published, but no-one ever talks about it these days. You're the first person that has said its excellent, since I began reading about comics on the internet! I suppose I'll have to try and get my hands on it some day.

Speaking of Vertigo, were you able to read Kid Eternity in your current sift through the Vertigo books? I think it came out in 1991.
I assume you're talking about the Grant Morrison Kid Eternity miniseries. It's actually pre-Vertigo, although I think it's been reprinted under that imprint. Might make sense to reread that soon, as a companion to Sebastian O. I have no thoughts of rereading the Vertigo Kid Eternity ongoing written by Ann Nocenti with art by Sean Phillips, because I remember it as one of the worst series in Vertigo history.

I think Moonshadow deserves to be thought of as a major "mature reader" work. If it had been written a few years later by Neil Gaiman it would probably easily be ranked with something like Stardust. It's the best of DeMatteis's mystical epics by a wide margin. There's a big fat trade collection that you could probably get through Interlibrary Loan, which was how I read it originally. Then I tracked down all the individual issues in bargain bins and read it again.
Made my way through a couple of Geoff Johns — plus one post-Geoff Johns — Superman collections: Superman and the Legion of Super-Heroes, Superman: Brainiac, and Superman: New Krypton vol. 4 (I'd read vol. 1 a little while ago, and vols. 2-3 weren't available). The first of those was....very much not for me, but the other two were enjoyable.

I also read this afternoon Siege: New Avengers and Siege: Dark Avengers, both of which were good enough to be worth reading, but not anything that I wish I'd bought.
Might make sense to reread [Kid Eternity] soon, as a companion to Sebastian O.

Well, I've only got the first two issues and looking out for no. three, and also, even though I remember checking which one I didn't have a few weeks ago, I now can't even place my hands on the first two. I blame Gremlins.

Made my way through a couple of Geoff Johns — plus one post-Geoff Johns — Superman collections: Superman and the Legion of Super-Heroes, Superman: Brainiac, and Superman: New Krypton vol. 4 (I'd read vol. 1 a little while ago, and vols. 2-3 weren't available). The first of those was....very much not for me, but the other two were enjoyable.

I've started reading Johns' Superman too. The Zod/Christopher one was ok. I was thrown a bit when these newly powered Kryptonians enslave all of America, including people like Batman and Powergirl, off-panel! I'm about to read the Bizarro one. The art looks great, but I'm looking forward to reading the classic Bizarro stories in colour in the back as much as the 'main feature'.

I also read this afternoon Siege: New Avengers and Siege: Dark Avengers, both of which were good enough to be worth reading, but not anything that I wish I'd bought.

I'm ploughing through Dark Reign at the moment and working towards Seige. Its ok, for what its trying to do. Enjoyable and consistent enough considerring it is a line-wide story. I was amused that Bendis' New Avengers are still only capable of sitting around eating take-away and watching TV during the Utopia events. How the mighty have been diminished!

The Utopia TPB is horribly put together though. It starts with the main prelude + 3 part story, and then goes back to the middle of that story for Jubilee's battle, and then cuts to two stories that have very little to do with Utopia (Namor and Emma Frost) and then ends with how the Dark X-Men were recruited, which all happened before any of the other events in this collection. There's also a whole comic tagged on at the end showing a conversation between Scott and Emma that was only teased in the middle of the main story. (Or one of the two main stories, rather.) All a bit of a dog's dinner in other words!

It possibly highlights how Marvel are basing their sales on roping in completists who'll buy add-ons to the event, rather than constructing one strong series with a good throughline at the outset.

I don't feel the need to own any of these books either...
Figserello said:
Might make sense to reread [Kid Eternity] soon, as a companion to Sebastian O.

Sebastian O is one of my very few Morrison gaps, at least as far as DC goes. In fact, it may be the only one. Well, except for the second Seaguy mini, but I'm waiting for that one to come out in trade.
Today's reads:
Action Comics #892 — Continuing Lex Luthor's residual-orange-lantern-fueled drive to find the source of more power. I liked the first two issues of this storyline a lot more than this one; this felt more like filler for the larger story. I like Cornell's characterization of Luthor, though, so I'll stick with it (so long as Borders keeps picking up the new issues, that is...).

Batman #702 — The second part of Morrison's R.I.P. missing chapter. It fills some gaps that perhaps weren't strictly necessary to be filled, but it's nice to get the additional detail and perspective.

Wonder Woman #602 — The new Wonder Woman continues her adventures. Not a lot to say about this one, really.

I'm also in the process of reading Batgirl Reborn, the TPB that collects the first seven issues of the new Batgirl series. A couple days ago, someone on one of the podcasts I listen to (I think it was Awesomed By Comics) likened this series to Bendis's Ultimate Spider-Man, and reading it in that light, I can definitely see that. It's got the same kind of light-hearted fun that that series has, and Stephanie's narration complements that feeling. I'm still not keen on the new costume, though; the purple....ribbing, I guess?...along the sides just looks off. I love the Lindsay Weir-esque army jacket look for Stephanie in her civilian wear, though.
Alan M. said:
Today's reads:
Action Comics #892 — Continuing Lex Luthor's residual-orange-lantern-fueled drive to find the source of more power. I liked the first two issues of this storyline a lot more than this one; this felt more like filler for the larger story. I like Cornell's characterization of Luthor, though, so I'll stick with it (so long as Borders keeps picking up the new issues, that is...).

Batman #702 — The second part of Morrison's R.I.P. missing chapter. It fills some gaps that perhaps weren't strictly necessary to be filled, but it's nice to get the additional detail and perspective.

Wonder Woman #602 — The new Wonder Woman continues her adventures. Not a lot to say about this one, really.

I'm also in the process of reading Batgirl Reborn, the TPB that collects the first seven issues of the new Batgirl series. A couple days ago, someone on one of the podcasts I listen to (I think it was Awesomed By Comics) likened this series to Bendis's Ultimate Spider-Man, and reading it in that light, I can definitely see that. It's got the same kind of light-hearted fun that that series has, and Stephanie's narration complements that feeling. I'm still not keen on the new costume, though; the purple....ribbing, I guess?...along the sides just looks off. I love the Lindsay Weir-esque army jacket look for Stephanie in her civilian wear, though.

I love that you brought up Lindsay Weir...star mathlete...
That was specifically for you, Doc. :)
Just read a Green Lantern collection, Wanted: Hal Jordan from earlier in Geoff Johns' run. I picked it up because, reading the various rainbow corps stories, I never quite got how the Star Sapphire became the Star Sapphire Corp complete with ring and everything, and this book collected the stories in which that happened. Without particularly meaning to, I've actually mostly kept up with Green Lantern in the trades, and reading this book — which picks up pretty much exactly where I stopped buying the comic back inna day — is kind of refreshing. It's not the big, epic tales that Johns has been telling with the book pretty much non-stop since the Sinestro Corps War; it's Earth-bound, with character moments and smaller (but still real) stakes.

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