Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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This title had soaring highs (Starlin, Englehart, Moench/Broderick) punctuated by crushing lows. It's interesting to compare how good it can be to how bad it can be. If my purpose holds, I intend to read the entire series (but not all in a row).

I read Marvel's first Captain Marvel back in the day, and what I remember about it chiefly was wondering why the heck I was buying it. It was pretty bad -- half-hearted Colan art, mediocre costume, clumsy premise. (I'm supposed to root for an alien spy?) I don't recommend it to anyone. It took the clumsy reboot (Zo? Was ist das Zo?) to make the strip readable.

And maybe I'm depressed by the Mar-Vell conversation, but I read The Green Lantern #1-4 last night, and am not feeling it. Why did he kill a prisoner in issue #3? He's seen far worse. It just seemed out of the blue and out of character. I'm assuming it's part of a Guardian plan to infiltrate the Blackstars, and that the "dead" guy really isn't. But if so it's a terrible plan, because it puts the other two Lanterns in the position of arresting the most famous GL of all, or compromising their own morals/values. That damages two perfectly good officers, either way they jump. (Unless they're in on it. Which I doubt.)

And otherwise, the Morrison magic seems absent. What am I missing?

“It took the clumsy reboot (Zo? Was ist das Zo?) to make the strip readable.”

Rather it took the pretty decent reboot (Roy Thomas/Gil Kane, #17) to make it readable. Roy got an idea to save the title and requested a last-minute rewrite of the end of #16. It lasted three issues, then Martin Goodman cancelled it based on sales reports of issues prior to the reboot. When the sales figures for #17-19 came in, he un-cancelled it six months later. Unfortunately, that reprieve lasted only two more issues (#20-12) before some blip on the sales chart prompted him to cancel it again.

Was Zo not involved in there somewhere? Maybe I'm thinking of the Starlin years. Come to think of it, I think that's when he got his "cosmic awareness," which sounds like a Starlin concept.

As for what I'm reading lately, I just burned through all five B.P.R.D.: Hell on Earth hardbacks in two nights. It's that good. Good monsters, good concepts, good characters, good comics.

What makes it for me is the fact that it is 100% Green Lantern starring in an mid-80's 2000AD comic. The story and the art just take me to another place that I love in comics, and I appreciate that it's taking place smack-dab in the middle of the DC Universe.

Captain Comics said:

..I read The Green Lantern #1-4 last night, and am not feeling it. Why did he kill a prisoner in issue #3? He's seen far worse. It just seemed out of the blue and out of character. I'm assuming it's part of a Guardian plan to infiltrate the Blackstars, and that the "dead" guy really isn't. But if so it's a terrible plan, because it puts the other two Lanterns in the position of arresting the most famous GL of all, or compromising their own morals/values. That damages two perfectly good officers, either way they jump. (Unless they're in on it. Which I doubt.)

And otherwise, the Morrison magic seems absent. What am I missing?

"Was Zo not involved in there somewhere?"

The "Zo" storyline ran in issues #11 ("Rebirth!") through #16. It was at the end of #16 that C.M. got his new costume and was imprisoned in the Phantom Zone, but that ending was tacked on at the last minute to accomodate Roy Thomas's reboot in issue #17. It seemed relatively seemless, but it was actually unplanned (according to Roy Thomas's introduction to volume two). I will be discussing this run of issues in depth soon (probably toward the end of the week), but I do want to finish re-reading them first.

Yes, the "cosmic awareness" came from Starlin.

The Phantom Zone?

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Was Zo not involved in there somewhere?"

The "Zo" storyline ran in issues #11 ("Rebirth!") through #16. It was at the end of #16 that C.M. got his new costume and was imprisoned in the Phantom Zone, but that ending was tacked on at the last minute to accomodate Roy Thomas's reboot in issue #17. It seemed relatively seemless, but it was actually unplanned (according to Roy Thomas's introduction to volume two). I will be discussing this run of issues in depth soon (probably toward the end of the week), but I do want to finish re-reading them first.

Yes, the "cosmic awareness" came from Starlin.

I read Human Target: Chance Meetings. This collects the 1999 Vertigo miniseries that moved the Human Target from backup-story fodder to headliner, and the followup graphic novel Human Target: Final Cut. I had previously read the miniseries, but not the graphic novel. 

In the miniseries, Christopher Chance has relocated from Boston to Los Angeles, and is semiretired, taking only the cases he finds "amusing." As the story opens, he rejects an entreaty from a prospective client, whose face has been shattered from one attempt on his life and is facing multiple rounds of reconstructive surgery. In any event, Chance is on another gig, impersonating a preacher, a Black man, in an inner-city church who is at war with the neighborhood drug dealer. 

We further learn Chance has taken on a protégé, Tom McFadden, who has a natural talent for impersonation but whose mind is unraveling from pretending to be someone else. As the story goes, we find that just about everyone -- Chance, Tom, the preacher, and Emerald, the contract killer who shattered that man's face with a bullet -- is living a double life 

Writer Peter Milligan makes Chance into a tortured man who has impersonated others for so long he is unsure he has a personality -- or a soul -- of his own. Edvin Biuković turns in some truly gorgeous art; unfortunately, he died at the age of 30 later that year from a brain tumor .

In Human Target: Final Cut, there is more specific use of the Hollywood setting. There's an extortionist targeting actors with the old "pay up or I'll kill you" bit. In disguise, Chance takes out the extortionist, but then things turn into a missing persons case, as the extortionist has kidnapped a teenage actor -- and he's the only one who knows were the kid is being kept. To find the kid, Chance impersonates the extortionist, and the experience starts to unravel his mind just like Tom McFadden.

I didn't like the art, by Javier Pulido. He did a lot better on She-Hulk, but I chalk that up to his style evolving and his having more experience under his belt.  

"You will bow down before me, Mar-Vell!! You, then one day, all of the many people who will use your name!"

The Baron said:

The Phantom Zone?

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Was Zo not involved in there somewhere?"

The "Zo" storyline ran in issues #11 ("Rebirth!") through #16. It was at the end of #16 that C.M. got his new costume and was imprisoned in the Phantom Zone, but that ending was tacked on at the last minute to accomodate Roy Thomas's reboot in issue #17. It seemed relatively seemless, but it was actually unplanned (according to Roy Thomas's introduction to volume two). I will be discussing this run of issues in depth soon (probably toward the end of the week), but I do want to finish re-reading them first.

Yes, the "cosmic awareness" came from Starlin.

"OK"



Philip Portelli said:

"You will bow down before me, Mar-Vell!! You, then one day, all of the many people who will use your name!"

The Baron said:

The Phantom Zone?

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Was Zo not involved in there somewhere?"

The "Zo" storyline ran in issues #11 ("Rebirth!") through #16. It was at the end of #16 that C.M. got his new costume and was imprisoned in the Phantom Zone, but that ending was tacked on at the last minute to accomodate Roy Thomas's reboot in issue #17. It seemed relatively seemless, but it was actually unplanned (according to Roy Thomas's introduction to volume two). I will be discussing this run of issues in depth soon (probably toward the end of the week), but I do want to finish re-reading them first.

Yes, the "cosmic awareness" came from Starlin.

"The Phantom Zone?"

Negative Zone. Crap!

By the Elders, that's beautiful, Baron!

Great to see Captain Marbles, Captain Thunder, the Gentleman, the Champion (with his amazing secret identity!) and, of course, Gomer Pyle!

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