Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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This was not the closest reading, but this is what I came up with.  I may have missed something.  What I find amazing is I just walked over to a book shelf and pulled down what I needed.  What a great time to be a comic book collector.

#27:  page 3:  there’s the fellow who was flipped off the roof.  A two-stores fall can be fatal and he is just laying there.  Bat-Man certainly didn’t do it with the intent of killing him, but ....  INCONCLUSIVE 

#28:  page 1:  another crook flipped off a roof.  Page 3:  a policeman thinking Batman is the leader of the crooks and has gotten away says: “Well at least we got the jewels and the other guys.”  Possibly implying that the crook that was flipped off the roof is alive and in custody.  INCONCLUSIVE 

#29:  page 9:  Jabah is choked by a rope around his neck.  There is a reference to Jabah in #30 (page 4), but we don’t know if he is alive or possibly in custody.  INCONCLUSIVE.  It looks like Dr. Death perishes in the fire, but that’s not the case.

#30:  panel 62:  Batman kicks Mikhail (Jabah’s replacement) and “There is a sickening snap as the Cossack’s neck breaks under the mighty pressure of Batman’s foot.”  Is he dead?  Maybe, probably.  Batman says “First Jabah!  Now you..and yet Doctor Death lives on!”  This seems to indicate they shared the same fate, so if Mikhail is dead, then so might be Jabah.  TWO POSSIBLE DEATHS:  JABAH AND MIKHAIL .

I’ll continue in another post.

#31:  doesn’t look like anyone dies.

#32:  Batman shots both The Monk and Dala with Silver bullets. They are vampires.  Do these count?  INCONCLUSIVE 

#33:  page 9: Napoleon/Kruger uses a death ray to incinerate someone he thinks is Batman.  Page 10:  Bruce thinks, while lighting a pipe:  “When I overpowered that guard and changed into his clothing, my rescue was complete ... and now to work.”  So it was the guard who was incinerated.  Batman has dressed him in his costume and escaped.  Is Batman culpable for Kruger incinerating the guard?  INCONCLUSIVE.  Page 11:  Batman crashes the batplane into Kruger’s dirigible.  “A terrific blast and the dirigible and the bat-plane are blown to smithereens.”  Did everyone escape? Were some killed?  It’s not clear, but Batman should have known that crashing into the dirigible may have resulted in the loss of life.  INCONCLUSIVE.  Page 12:  While Kruger is flying a plane, he uses a gas pellet to knock him out and Kruger crashes and his body is later recovered.  Looks like Batman’s action led to Kruger’s death.  DEATH.

#34:  Duc Dorterre’s car flies off a cliff and Batman saves himself and Karel by grabbing the rope ladder hanging down from the bat plane.  “And catches it just in time to escape sudden death.”  The implication is that the Duc dies, but is Batman to blame?  He could save either Karel or the Duc.  INCONCLUSIVE 

#35:  page 9:  Batman is attacked by two giant Mongols with swords.  He “hurls” one backwards and he is impales on the other one’s sword.  It looks like the sword pierces the guy’s latissimus dorsi muscle and likely isn’t fatal.  I don’t think Batman intended for that to happen.  INCONCLUSIVE.  Page 12:  Batman hurls the ruby idol at Sheldon Lenox and that knocks him through an open window  “and [he] hurtles to his death.”  Killing him wasn’t Batman’s intent, but his actions did lead to Lenox’s death.  DEATH.

#36:  doesn’t look like anyone dies.

#37:  page 3:  Batman frees Joey, who then kills three crooks.  Is Batman responsible for those deaths?  Page 12:  Batman punches The Count, who falls backwards and is impaled by his sword that is sticking through a door (do I detect a theme here?  Again, killing The Count is not Batman’s intent.  His action lead to the death, but it wasn’t his intent.  DEATH.

I don’t get 24 deaths.  Some people do die, and with the exception of the two vampires, I don’t think killing was ever Batman’s intention.  How do you interpret the deaths.  Again, I don’t get 24 unless I missed something big, like a lot of deaths when the dirigible crashed.

My correction to this one seems to have disappeared.  I missed a biggie.  In #27:  Batman punches Stryker and he crashes through a railing and falls into a tank of acid.  I don’t think Batman intended for that to happen, but his actions did lead to Stryker’s death.  DEATH.

Dave Palmer said:

This was not the closest reading, but this is what I came up with.  I may have missed something.  What I find amazing is I just walked over to a book shelf and pulled down what I needed.  What a great time to be a comic book collector.

#27:  page 3:  there’s the fellow who was flipped off the roof.  A two-stores fall can be fatal and he is just laying there.  Bat-Man certainly didn’t do it with the intent of killing him, but ....  INCONCLUSIVE 

#28:  page 1:  another crook flipped off a roof.  Page 3:  a policeman thinking Batman is the leader of the crooks and has gotten away says: “Well at least we got the jewels and the other guys.”  Possibly implying that the crook that was flipped off the roof is alive and in custody.  INCONCLUSIVE 

#29:  page 9:  Jabah is choked by a rope around his neck.  There is a reference to Jabah in #30 (page 4), but we don’t know if he is alive or possibly in custody.  INCONCLUSIVE.  It looks like Dr. Death perishes in the fire, but that’s not the case.

#30:  panel 62:  Batman kicks Mikhail (Jabah’s replacement) and “There is a sickening snap as the Cossack’s neck breaks under the mighty pressure of Batman’s foot.”  Is he dead?  Maybe, probably.  Batman says “First Jabah!  Now you..and yet Doctor Death lives on!”  This seems to indicate they shared the same fate, so if Mikhail is dead, then so might be Jabah.  TWO POSSIBLE DEATHS:  JABAH AND MIKHAIL .

I’ll continue in another post.

“I'm just not reading any Marvel right now, but I may have bought this just to help support Rob's enthusiasm. I don't love his art, but I don't hate it either. I would have expected this book to be bananas, much like The Coming of the Supermen (which you and I talked about briefly on another thread). I actually wouldn't buy anything in order to make fun of it, but I think I would have bought it to read and say, ‘This is NUTS! I love it!’”

You shame me. I will try to take this approach moving forward. Rob Liefeld certainly seems to be enthusiastic, I’ll give him that. It nevertheless seems odd to compare him to Neal Adams in any way whatsoever. I do think Liefeld’s definition of “creativity” involves “tweaking” someone else’s originality. I have heard him say (discussing the formation of Image Comics), “What if I want to create a fast guy? DC already has a fast guy. Marvel already has a fast guy.” To me, that means, “What if I want to design a costume?”

Moving on…

TALES OF THE BATMAN (ETC.): After having read a Daredevil Masterworks by Gene Colan and a Captain Marvel Masterworks by Gene Colan, I decided to read a Tales of the Batman by Gene Colan. I have several volumes of “Tales” (and its sister series “Legends”), but not one of the Gene Colan ones (of which there are two). First I went to my LCS. They had every volume I didn’t own except Gene Colan volume one. I then went to my secondary shop and my tertiary shop, and neither of them had any of the “Tales” series (which is why my LCS is my primary shop in the first place).

My two primary online sources didn’t have any in stock, either. There are plenty available on Amazon, but none at reasonable (or even realistic) prices. Tracy found one on eBay, though, and at cover price no less! It had a slight ding on the cover, which the seller pointed out in a close-up photograph. Got that one and gave him good feedback.

I wasn’t reading the Bat-titles for just too long pre-Crisis, but I was reading The New Teen Titans. I was intrigued enough by a cameo appearance of Jason Todd that I bought several recent backissues of Batman and Detective Comics. Gene Colan had already been on the series and left, but was soon to return. Volume one of the “Tales” series is comprised entire of issues I have not read. I decided to follow up with the stories I had read (reprinted on slick paper), so I bought volume two as well. I was surprised to discover more Gene Colan issues I had not read. Presumably they will do a Gene Colan volume three (or a Gerry Conway volume three or a Doug Moench volume one) because there are many stories left to be reprinted. The most recent volume came out in 2018, so maybe more are planned for 2019.

All that Batman put me in the mood for more, so I decided to buy the Don Newton volume. That one had been in stock at my LCS for years (since 2011), and I didn’t see any high demand for it if it hadn’t sold by this time. (And remember, I had seen it on the shelf the week before.) when I went back to buy it, it was gone. I asked the owner if he had sold Tales of the Batman: Don Newton within the last week, and he replied, “Yep. It’s out of print, too.” Arrgh! No need to check the other shops because, as I noted, they didn’t have any in stock the week before. Amazon, again, had several over-priced volumes for sale. Luckily, one of my regular online sources had a copy for cover price, so I snagged it. Should have it by the end of the day today.

Also, thanks, Dave, for compiling Batman’s “death count.” The reason I didn’t do it myself is because of what you encountered: too much of it is subjective or inconclusive. I’m simply enjoying the stories at this point. I’m up to Batman #2.

In addition to re-reading early Bill Finger/Bob Kane Batman stories and Gene Colan’s Tales of the Batman, I am continuing to read stories from The Brave & the Bold omibus volume two.

#124: The Batman and Sgt. Rock “team up” with Bob Haney, Jim Aparo and Murry Boltinoff in a truly weird meta-textual tale. I’ve never seen a picture of Bob Haney, but how he is depicted in this issue is not how I pictured him!

#124: A somewhat different relationship between Batman and the Flash than that shown in the current Heroes in Crisis series. At one point, the Flash says, “As a police scientist, I know fingerprints don’t lie! You’re the detective genius… you figure it all out, chum!”

What did we do before the internet?

Here is a picture of Bob Haney from Wikipedia

And here is one that accompanied Mark Evanier’s obituary for him (2004). He is with Arnold Drake.

"Here is a picture of Bob Haney from Wikipedia"

Aren't you the investigative reporter today! That's more like I would have pictured him. Now can you find a picture of what he looked like in 1974, or a panel of how he was depicted in B&B #124? :)

Never mind. Here it is.

Will these help?

Yeah, that picture on the bottom appeares to be the reference for the panel of him speaking on the phone.

Like I said, not how I pictured him!

What did we do before the internet?

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