As some of you know, I fell off the DC comp list with The New 52, and decided that was a sign from Zeus to start trade-waiting. And with the April solicits, I see decision time has arrived.

That is to say: Which trades or HCs will I buy? I'm certainly not going to pop for all 52, so I have to pick and choose. So let me ask you, Legionnaires:

  • Which titles are so intrinsic to New 52 continuity that they are musts?
  • Which titles are just so flaming good that they are musts?
  • Which titles lend themselves to collections the best?
  • Which titles can be "safely" skipped?
  • Which titles are YOU buying?


And so forth. Sound off, folks! Which New 52 titles would you choose for the Captain Comics bookshelf?

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It's been no small secret that I have been utterly disappointed in DC since the 'convenient excuse' of FlashPoint and the "New 52!" to throw away the history of the DCU. These days, I can barely look at most DC comic titles with feeling let down.
I guess I can call myself something of a a hypocrite with BATMAN '66. I watched the show when I was a kid (yes, I'm THAT old) & the comic nurtures a fondness of the show it's based on. I can't say those who didn't watch the show when it originally aired will understand.

The only comic I don't understand utterly is DAMIAN, SON OF BATMAN. Is this a telling of the 'origin' of the Batman of Batman #666? It feels like they are trying to justify the character all over again.

 I can't say those who didn't watch the show when it originally aired will understand.

They don't need to have seen it in its first -run; it's been on in reruns ever since, so lots more Batman fans have seen the show. Which is good, as targeting a comic to the 55+ age group today isn't a good business plan.

Even so, the existence of a comic book about a 50-year-old TV show fascinates me.  

On the one hand, if they'd done a comic like that when I was a kid, watching the TV show in the first place, it would have had to have been about something from 1916! That seems a lot longer away from 1966 than today seems from 1966.

OTOH, those people in 1916 were going to see HUGE changes to their cultural lives--talking movies, radio, TV, comic books. Whereas we can still watch episodes of the 1966 Batman TV show on TVs (the only way we can see them), and we're reading a comic book about the show, in the same format of 32 color pages, as I could have done as a kid, albeit for a lot more money.

So how much have things changed in those 50 years? We haven't come very far compared to what the people in 1916 had to look forward to before the Batman TV show came on.

-- MSA

I think we'll see that sort of change with the coming of true 3d/hologrpahic technology becomes available. Right now I think we're sort of stagnant in some ways. The sitcom and tv drama format hasn't changed much since the early days of tv and in many ways the reality shows are advanced forms of Hidden Camera. There's more channels, there is more stuff on the channels but it is hard to find something that I haven't seen before.

Granted.

Mr. Silver Age said:

They don't need to have seen it in its first -run; it's been on in reruns ever since, so lots more Batman fans have seen the show. Which is good, as targeting a comic to the 55+ age group today isn't a good business plan.

Even so, the existence of a comic book about a 50-year-old TV show fascinates me.  

On the one hand, if they'd done a comic like that when I was a kid, watching the TV show in the first place, it would have had to have been about something from 1916! That seems a lot longer away from 1966 than today seems from 1966.

OTOH, those people in 1916 were going to see HUGE changes to their cultural lives--talking movies, radio, TV, comic books. Whereas we can still watch episodes of the 1966 Batman TV show on TVs (the only way we can see them), and we're reading a comic book about the show, in the same format of 32 color pages, as I could have done as a kid, albeit for a lot more money.

So how much have things changed in those 50 years? We haven't come very far compared to what the people in 1916 had to look forward to before the Batman TV show came on.

-- MSA

My New 52 readling list dropped significantly  -- partially out of irritation with DC's penchant for changing creative teams mid-storyline (Batwoman being the most recent example, a book I was actually no longer even buying), and partially out of self-preservation as the crossovers and tie-ins began to blossom. So as much as certain storylines might interest me in a what-happens-next sense -- Forever Evil, for instance -- I'm cutting them off for a while. For now, my default position on new DC books is "no" -- although a one-shot like Harley Quinn 0 can clear that hurdle.

My only ongoing books at the moment are Flash, The Movement, and Wonder Woman. I don't expect Azzarello to be on Wonder Woman forever, and when his storyline ends, I'll probably drop the book. I'll read The Movement for the length of its run, but it's an untested property, so its prospects aren't great. (It should last at least to issue 12, though; Simone mentioned she was recently writing issues 10 and 11, which is a good sign.) With Flash I'm a lifer.

I'm also still reading Earth-2, despite my intentions to drop it when Robinson left. I'm still really interested in the book, and look forward to where Taylor takes it. But I'm taking it story by story for now; it's off my pull list, and I'm buying it off the rack. The two other books I was really enjoying but have dropped are Swamp Thing and All-Star Western. Both are gone mostly for budget reasons, but I still really like them.

What's a must-read in the New 52 for me today?

All-Star Western and World's Finest. 

All-Star Western because it continues the adventures of Jonah Hex, which I've been following since the original All-Star Western from the '70s. Although, on the other hand, I had been following the adventures of John Constantine in Hellblazer since issue one, but I considered the end of the title a good jumping-off point, although I did read the first two issues of Constantine.

With the help of the quarter bin, I've tried several New 52 titles. For example, I read the first seven or eight issues of Earth 2, and an equal number of Justice League of America. Earth 2 kind of interested me because it was close to what I would expect and want from a reboot -- allowing the reader to explore these new circumstances with new-and-different versions of the familiar characters (and without having to keep up with decades of continuity). That's what keeps me coming back to World's Finest. However, Earth 2 didn't do it for me; the whole eeeeVViiil government conspiracy aspect turned me off.

Justice League of America drew me in because of the Superman/Wonder Woman romance; done right, this could be interesting. 

I wanted to like Superman and I did like Action Comics, when it was about Superman's early days Once he lost the Li'L Abner look, as dumb as it was, I lost interest.

I've taken a look at Batman, since it's doing a Year One story, but 13 issues of it is about nine or 10 too many, if you ask me. And I was following Batgirl and Catwoman, for a good long while (more than 12 issues) but I also lost interest in both of them.

I really don't read any of the DCU proper save one: Wonder Woman. That book seems to be in enough of its own contained universe that it doesn't affect me whatsoever.

I enjoy both All-Star Western and Wonder Woman, so they get my vote.

Have to say I'm going to go ahead and put in for Action Comics now. As I said on another thread, for over a year now, all I've read is Wonder Woman out of DC (New Universe, anyway). But Greg Pak and Aaron Kuder have me recommending Action Comics. Fun stuff.

Admittedly, Greg Pak has impressed me in the past.  I may give Action Comics a look.

All-Star Western is the only DC book I'm reading these days.

I have to admit that I downloaded Forever Evil #4 after reading a positive review on Facebook by our erstwhile Doc  Beechler. It was pretty fun. From everything I understand, this has been the best crossover event of the new DCNu, but also of the past five to ten years.

There is a great character moment for Lex Luthor (who I always feel is much better played as a sympathetic "Marvel" character than as a cartoon villain), and then also for Batman which gives way to the last triumphant page. I think I may go tomorrow and pick up the previous issues.

Between this surrender and the Greg Pak issues of Action Comics, this could be the first gradual prying of the DCNu for the expatriate Wandering Sensei.

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