Why did Marvel have 'split books' and DC had 'back ups'?

Why was this? Possibly Marvel split books had equally popular heroes thereby more democratic than Detective's Batman and Martian Manhunter or Batman and Elongated Man? I think I've answered my own question here, errr ... Okay:  which format did you prefer?

Could DC have had a split book - Hawkman and Atom was one, but the format never really took off - unless I've overlooked something. What characters would have been worthy of equal-billing?

Could Marvel have had back up strips - there was Tales of Asgard in the back of JIM/Thor, but I think that was it. What minor Marvel heroes could have been a back up, rather than a co-headliner?

Views: 1375

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I liked Mike Sekowsky too, especially his Wonder Woman comics (I just wish he had stayed around to draw her when her powers returned). I remember enjoying some of his Supergirl too, but I think he took some liberties with her powers (and some of those costumes designs were shockingly bad) but a good experiment and better than the rather bland stories that were to follow. Didn't it become a bit of a 'romance' book in the end? And I've never been keen, to say the very least, on Jack Abel, with whom he was saddled with on the inking.

Tim Boo Ba said:

Whereas the Sekowsky era is my favourite of Supergirl. 

Come to think of it, in the early Silver Age(1) the Marvel titles in which back-ups appeared were also all long-running titles. (Rawhide Kid and Two Gun Kid were both revivals of a title after a hiatus with a new hero.) If Marvel didn't have to re-establish to the postmaster that a periodical was a periodical every issue, it could be that it used back-ups in its older titles because it got its second-class mailing permits for them under one set of rules, while it got the permits for Fantastic Four and its other new titles under another. At some point the old rules may have become obsolete for the older titles too (when the "Inhumans" series ended in Thor the Thor stories became book-length). 

 

The early Silver Age Millie the Model and Patsy Walker issues I checked only carried their title features, but carried four stories, then three. I also had a look at what DC was doing on the theory that it had the same postmaster. In the early Silver Age DC's Superman, Batman and Blackhawk usually carried three stories. The Flash, which continued Flash Comics's numbering, usually carried two stories (as the Showcase issues had done). Wonder Woman switched from usually three stories to usually two in 1958. These titles sometimes carried book-length stories divided into chapters (e.g. "The Superman of the Past", Superman #113, 1957), but some started doing it earlier and did it more often than others (the earliest book-length Blackhawk story I found was "The Super-Cavemen of 15,000 B.C." in Blackhawk #189, 1963). I think DC's The Adventures of Jerry Lewis and The Adventures of Bob Hope routinely carried book-length stories.

 

Corrections welcome; I didn't check every issue of these titles. My sources of information were DC Indexes and the GCD.

 

(1) The "Origins of the Uncanny X-Men" back-up series didn't start until X-Men #38, 1967.

Luke Blanchard said:

If Marvel didn't have to re-establish to the postmaster that a periodical was a periodical every issue, it could be that it used back-ups in its older titles because it got its second-class mailing permits for them under one set of rules, while it got the permits for Fantastic Four and its other new titles under another. At some point the old rules may have become obsolete for the older titles too

It seems that there must have been some guidelines handed down to individual postmasters from what was then the Post Office Department. I get the impression that whoever was evaluating whether a magazine qualified for second class mailing privileges and what rate to charge them probably only looked at the magazine when it originally applied rather than every issue of every magazine, which would have been impossible. Hence we have MOON GIRL becoming A MOON, A GIRL, ROMANCE so it wouldn't have to reapply.

This is kind of maddening. I did some searches and found the following links from the U.S. Postal Service and the U.S. Postal Regulatory Commission. Each of these speaks of classes of mail, including the second-class magazine rate. Even the first one, delineating the history of the rate since the beginnings of the country, doesn't seem to get into specific content of a magazine. Different rates were charged based upon the percentage of advertizing content, whether or not it was non-profit, and whether or not it was only for local (same county) mailing. Nothing I could find talks about deciding something is or isn't a magazine based upon multiple features or text content.

http://about.usps.com/who-we-are/postal-history/periodicals-postage...

http://pe.usps.com/text/dmm300/707.htm

http://www.prc.gov/Docs/40/40518/PRC-LR-2.pdf

...DC carried (most notably) those Henry Boltinoff gag strips (also Strange But True and the like) , Luke , I imagine those fulfilled the  requirements sufficiently .

Luke Blanchard said:

Come to think of it, in the early Silver Age(1) the Marvel titles in which back-ups appeared were also all long-running titles. (Rawhide Kid and Two Gun Kid were both revivals of a title after a hiatus with a new hero.) If Marvel didn't have to re-establish to the postmaster that a periodical was a periodical every issue, it could be that it used back-ups in its older titles because it got its second-class mailing permits for them under one set of rules, while it got the permits for Fantastic Four and its other new titles under another. At some point the old rules may have become obsolete for the older titles too (when the "Inhumans" series ended in Thor the Thor stories became book-length). 

 

The early Silver Age Millie the Model and Patsy Walker issues I checked only carried their title features, but carried four stories, then three. I also had a look at what DC was doing on the theory that it had the same postmaster. In the early Silver Age DC's Superman, Batman and Blackhawk usually carried three stories. The Flash, which continued Flash Comics's numbering, usually carried two stories (as the Showcase issues had done). Wonder Woman switched from usually three stories to usually two in 1958. These titles sometimes carried book-length stories divided into chapters (e.g. "The Superman of the Past", Superman #113, 1957), but some started doing it earlier and did it more often than others (the earliest book-length Blackhawk story I found was "The Super-Cavemen of 15,000 B.C." in Blackhawk #189, 1963). I think DC's The Adventures of Jerry Lewis and The Adventures of Bob Hope routinely carried book-length stories.

 

Corrections welcome; I didn't check every issue of these titles. My sources of information were DC Indexes and the GCD.

 

(1) The "Origins of the Uncanny X-Men" back-up series didn't start until X-Men #38, 1967.

...A belated thank you , Mr. Silver Age .

Have those issues made the Chronicles yet ???

Mr. Silver Age said:

The Riddler came back two issues later, in #142. It was reprinted in Batman Archives #7.

-- MSA

Thanks, Richard, E.D.

...I see this goes into some interesting comments about the Text Page Rule that appear to have escaped me the first time so there's my justification for doing the Bump ----- Aside from that , the mention of SUPERMAN FAMILY makes me want to bring up Marvel's series of 00s Spider-Man titles titled SPIDER-MAN FAMILY or some slight variation of that phrase , which had 104 comic-book pages and featured one 22-page new story and another 10-or-something pager - almost all of those stories set in the past of the MU at some point or another , with reprints filling the rest of the title .

  It's possible that I may have been posting about them here when they were contemporary (Geez' , I'm getting old .)...What about the 32-page 00s SPIDER-MAN UNL:IMITED and X-MEN UNLIMITED (the first of which I pulled , the second I did not) , too ?????????

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service