Just added a new post to my blog, this one spotlighting the often-maligned JOHNNY STORM, THE HUMAN TORCH series.  The first 5 covers (so far), lovingly restored, in all their 4-color glory.
 

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The notion that Hitler had many doubles was already in circulation during the war. In the 1941 British comedy Gasbags, which can be found at Internet Archive, stars a team of comics known as the Crazy Gang, and has at least two good gags one of which I'm about to spoil, the gang are carried away on a runaway barrage balloon and end up in a German prison camp filled entirely with them. It's a pleasingly surreal sequence. The internet tells me Time ran a paragraph about Hitler's use of a double in 1935.

Kirk G said:

That was one of the scariest comics I ever owned, because of that giant robot that's threatening from behind. 

 

When I first sometimes watched Lost in Space as a kid I was too young to follow the plots and found it very scary. One episode ending made a great impression on me. The Robinsons are standing outside their spaceship. The robot utters an urgent warning of danger. Then a truly enormous monster walks over the horizon, picks up the spaceship, and strolls away!

 

Except that's not what happens. I'm positive the sequence was the lead-in to the episode "The Prisoners of Space". The creature is about human size and carries a communication device that I confused with the Jupiter 2. The sequence as I originally saw it is one of my favourite Lost in Space moments.

I don't recall it either, Robin....and I then went to my Masterworks collection to find it, and HORRORS, I failed to by Volume 66 which has the first half of the Torch adventures. I got the second volume and spent an hour re-reading those (ahem) classics late last night.

 

It's an interesting coincidence that you should mention this book, because over on Til the Last Helmock Dies blog, James has just recently (last August) posted his scan of the worn cover of this book as well, having just picked it up, I guess. That's a pretty wierd coincidence, eh?

It was a shame that there was no value at Marvel for these anthology titles as Strange Tales, Marvel Tales, Tales of Suspense/to Astonish and Journey into Mystery were discarded or hijacked by Doctor Strange, Spider-Man reprints, Hulk, Captain America and Thor. I would have preferred that each promotion to their own book started with a more honest #1.

Ironicly, Robin, that's where I first saw this tale as well...in Marvel Tales.  So I never saw the cover either.  IMHO, this is not the best cover, but does clearly get the idea of fire and ice being "side by side" on the deck of a ship. I would have asked the artist for a better cover, if I had been incharge. Perhaps this could pass as a splash inside.

I'm not certain why Marvel chose to continue to the numbering of Strange Tales, Tales of Suspense and Tales to Astonish when they "split-off" the books. Perhaps there was some perceived benefit to having either a long-running title...or a mailing permit that required the numbering to continue...  I just don't know.

I do recall the odd bounce that both the Submariner and Iron Man strips took.... and I'm not sure just why Marvel married those two 10 page installments together for just one more split book appearance. I'll have to go back and look at the storylines to see if there's some indication that either was padding or marking time to fill in the second half of the issue that they share.

Clearly, someone had plotted the stories in anticipation of there being one more half book installment before the big debut of their solo titles.

If you look at the first issue of the new solo titles, they almost all have some form of a framing device to retell the origin for those who are picking up the book for the first time. Two notable exceptions: Iron Man and SHIELD (Steranko's allready been discussed a bit, but why didn't Iron Man have it included in his story?)

Dandy Forsdyke said:

It was a shame that there was no value at Marvel for these anthology titles as Strange Tales, Marvel Tales, Tales of Suspense/to Astonish and Journey into Mystery were discarded or hijacked by Doctor Strange, Spider-Man reprints, Hulk, Captain America and Thor. I would have preferred that each promotion to their own book started with a more honest #1.

I know that compared to long-running DC comics like Batman, Detective Comics, Superman, etc, the number of the Marvel comics were all so much lower and easier to remember.  High numbers in the 200s and 300s just seemed to be astronomical to us kids, and the hopes of ever reading them all, let alone collecting them, were about nil.

As for IRON MAN AND SUB-MARINER #1 (and only), IIRC they each had a 10-pager wrapping up a continued story. Haven't read it in years, so I may be wrong.

Yeah, well, considering the awful cover joke, that probably offended the women's lib crowd back in '73, I'm not surprised that nobody wanted to collect Millie!

OMG, I remember pawing through the basket of new magazines and comics as they arrived at the local drug store to find the new Marvels each Tuesday and Thursday. I probably pawed right over and past that issue when it showed up.

As a kid of 11 year old, I got the point of the joke, but didn't feel it was sexist,because she was a MODEL and in my kid's view, was dressing to entice that sort of attention from males. (Still, that copy was written by married white males..)

Interesting.  My reaction was generally different.  While I would have loved to have read everything when I was a kid, the reality was that getting to a store to get comics--let alone having money to buy comics on a regular basis--made the idea of actually collecting comics pretty much a moot point.  I just concentrated on reading and enjoying the stories that I could, and if I was able to finish a continued story, so much the better.

Kirk G said:

High numbers in the 200s and 300s just seemed to be astronomical to us kids, and the hopes of ever reading them all, let alone collecting them, were about nil.

I remember reading a Millie the Model comic when I was a kid, and I thought it was pretty similar to something that Archie would put out. Not particularly aimed at girls or boys, more of a humor comic than anything else.

While I'm sure that the comic had a high female readership, I have my doubts that it was a major target of the Feminist movement.  Had it been more of a drama, perhaps, but the jokes never seemed particularly crass or offensive--at least in terms of what I've read.  Unfortunately, we don't have too many female readers here to offer a different perspective, so it's hard to say.

George Poague said:


Another sexist cover joke. Makes you wonder if this book really was aimed at girls, or at adolescent boys who wanted to look at cheesecake.

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