Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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A lot of those 50's sci-fi movies had female scientists who were obviously expected to give up their (presumably hard-won) careers once Mr. Wonderful came along. You keep waiting for the women to slap these guys.

Maaaaaaaaaaaaaaybe, but the film comes down pretty hard on the side of the familial connection being another Joker delusion. I reviewed it when it came out, and my feelings haven't changed. It has an exceptional central performance and great mise en scene, and it works as a disturbing, if highly derivative (killer clown take on Falling Down crossed with Taxi Driver) stand-alone, but I never once bought it's connection to some larger DCU. The Batman references feel shoehorned in; the filmmakers practically leave the plot temporarily so we can see the Waynes die, yet again. It would have worked better entirely disconnected from any version of the DCU, but then, it wouldn't have received anything like the same level of publicity and BO.

YMMV

It took me a minute to realize you meant "box office".  I was like, "How could a movie have body odor?"

JD DeLuzio said:

. It would have worked better entirely disconnected from any version of the DCU, but then, it wouldn't have received anything like the same level of publicity and BO.

YMMV

Elizabeth Taylor should have won the Oscar for Cat On a Hot Tin Roof (1958) but didn't because of her scandalous relationship with Eddie Fisher (father of Carrie). Even though she was having another scandalous relationship with Richard Burton in 1961 while filming Cleopatra (whose remake is now creating another controversy), she won the Oscar for BUtterfield 8, a lesser film because she was (temporarily) back in the industry and public's good side because of her health problems. She had pneumonia so severe that she needed a tracheotomy. This combined with her not getting the Oscar she truly deserved secured her the win for Best Actress! 

(All this was vouched by my mother, a big Liz Taylor fan!)

The Baron said:

A lot of those 50's sci-fi movies had female scientists who were obviously expected to give up their (presumably hard-won) careers once Mr. Wonderful came along. You keep waiting for the women to slap these guys.

....and of course, they take off their glasses and suddenly everyone notices how good looking they are.

In the movie they make it clear that Joker's mother was insane, according to Arkham records, like Thomas Wayne said when confronted by Arthur. So she was either insane and slept with Wayne or insane and imagined she did. 

Well, some movies do stink pretty bad.

On another note, I cannot believe I made an its/it's typo! The shame!

The Baron said:

It took me a minute to realize you meant "box office".  I was like, "How could a movie have body odor?"

JD DeLuzio said:

. It would have worked better entirely disconnected from any version of the DCU, but then, it wouldn't have received anything like the same level of publicity and BO.

YMMV

Oh, this is too funny.

Watching FIVE MILLION YEARS TO EARTH (or as it was named when I watched it as a lad, QUATERMASS AND THE PIT), this exchange occurred between Quatermass and Dr. Roney, the archaeologist who was also involved in investigating the weird, ancient locusts found in an excavation:

Quatermass: "Roney, if we found our Earth was doomed, say by climatic changes, what would we do about it?"

Roney: "Nothing, just go on squabbling as usual."

That film was made in 1967.

Final Update:

1)Bride of the Monster (1955)
2)Frankenstein (1931)
3)Dracula (1931) (Spanish-language version)
4)One Missed Call (2003)
5)One Missed Call 2 (2005)
6)One Missed Call (2007) American re-make
7)Whispering Corridors (1998)
8)Memento Mori (1999)
9)Wishing Stairs (2003)
10)Alien (1979)
11)House (1977)
12)A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
13)The Wolf Man (1941)
14)Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
15)The Thing from Another World (1951)
16)Goke, Body Snatcher from Hell (1968)
17)The Living Skeleton (1968)
18)Night of the Living Dead (1990)
19)Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994)
20)Matango (1963)
21)Jason X (2002)
22)The Mummy (1932)
23)Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)
24)Junk (1999)
25)Let the Right One In (2008)
26)Ju-On (2002)
27)The Grudge (2004)
28)The Grudge 2 (2006)
29)Ring (1998)
30)Godzilla (1954)
31)Halloween (1978)



The Baron said:

Update:

1)Bride of the Monster (1955)
2)Frankenstein (1931)
3)Dracula (1931) (Spanish-language version)
4)One Missed Call (2003)
5)One Missed Call 2 (2005)
6)One Missed Call (2007) American re-make
7)Whispering Corridors (1998)
8)Memento Mori (1999)
9)Wishing Stairs (2003)
10)Alien (1979)
11)House (1977)
12)A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
13)The Wolf Man (1941)
14)Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
15)The Thing from Another World (1951)



The Baron said:

Watching a horror movie a day for October.  So far:

1)Bride of the Monster (1955)
2)Frankenstein (1931)
3)Dracula (1931) (Spanish-language version)
4)One Missed Call (2003)
5)One Missed Call 2 (2005)
6)One Missed Call (2007) American re-make
7)Whispering Corridors (1998)
8)Memento Mori (1999)

Quatermass: "Roney, if we found our Earth was doomed, say by climatic changes, what would we do about it?"

Roney: "Nothing, just go on squabbling as usual."

I used to find it highly implausible that a planet as scientifically advanced as Krypton would deny Jor-el's science about the planet's impending doom... until climate change.

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (1939): When I set the recorder sometime last year, I was hoping for the Lon Chaney Sr. version, one of the few Aurora kits that I still have on a shelf. (The rest have all fallen apart or been lost in moves.) Alas, it was this version.

It wasn't too bad. But since I know the story already, there was very little that surprised me, and Charles Laughton's makeup wasn't very convincing. I'd also criticize his performance -- Quasimodo was more goofy than scary or pitiable -- except that I'm not sure what else he could have done with this script.

The interesting bits were elsewhere. It was strange to see a Middle Ages king (Louis XI in this case) who was so progressive. That seemed counter-intuitive. Also Edmund O'Brien was in this movie, but he was young! Also blond! I'd never seen him as anything but as the grizzled character actor he was in later years. And Thomas Mitchell, another famous grizzled character actor, was the Beggar King, and to my mind, miscast. His Ye Olde Tyme accent was non-existent, so he sounded disturbingly like someone from modern New York, while everyone else was doing mid-Atlantic or posh English accents.

Maureen O'Hara was the female lead, and as usual, was drop-dead gorgeous. That actually gave us opportunity to joke about how good skin and hair care was among the gypsies in the 14th century. Judging by O'Hara's appearance, they seemed to have access to all sorts of makeup, not to mention hair curlers. The things you learn in movies!

THE WOLFMAN (2010): Once again, not the famous one. But I'd never seen it, and gave it a go.

Here again I have to remark on odd casting, with Benicio del Toro as the romantic lead. I guess he couldn't butcher the part any worse than Lon Chaney Jr., but I'm so accustomed to seeing him play oddball supporting characters (The Collector in Marvel movies, DJ in The Last Jedi, Jackie Boy in Sin City) that I was unprepared to take him seriously. Once I was used to the idea, he did very well. He was probably the most impressive in the cast, due to sheer effort.

The others:

I love me some Anthony Hopkins, but he's done the Hannibal Lector role so often that not only did I peg him as the bad guy from the start, but once revealed, he basically phoned it in.

Hugo Weaving was fairly one note as Inspector Abberline. The only interesting bit is that when they introduced him I said,"Huh, that's the name of the inspector who ran the Jack the Ripper case." And sure enough, a few minutes later Lawrence Talbot took time out of his interrogation to say, "You were the inspector on the The Ripper case." "Yes," replied Weaving, and that was that. I thought it a lost opportunity; Larry should  have followed up with, "Well then, you should be accustomed to failure." But alas, nothing was done with it.

Oh, and we made Elrond jokes whenever he was on screen.Honestly, he kind of looks like an elf even when he's not trying to.

Emily Blunt was the female lead. I have little to say about that. She gets great reviews and is in a lot of genre stuff that I like, but I've never warmed to her. She always looks stiff, stern and humorless. This role gives her little to be loose, happy or funny about, so my opinion remains unchanged. (I found her turn as the stern drill sergeant in Edge of Tomorrow to be virtual type casting.) Hopefully I'll eventually see her in something that will show the range critics keep telling me she has.

The special effects were great. Ever since American Werewolf in London, werewolf transformations just get better and better.

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (1939): When I set the recorder sometime last year, I was hoping for the Lon Chaney Sr. version, one of the few Aurora kits that I still have on a shelf.

A year or two ago I was happy that I had a chance to watch the Lon Chaney Sr version, I think from Turner Classic Movies. If you're like me, you would be very disappointed.

Chaney's performance is fine, but the story had more in common with the Disney version than the original story. All the nice people get to live and only the bad guy dies. I hated it.

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