Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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never seen it, and you folks aren't making me want to see it.

I think "Goones" is a movie you had to see as a kid for it to mean anything to you. I was in my mid-20s when it came out; it did nothing for me. But neither did "E.T." a few years earlier.

 

Just speculating here -- since I haven't tried to watch it since 1985 -- but I imagine "Goones" would be unbearable for a middle-aged or older person, like being trapped in a room full of screaming, yammering children. Got my fill of that when my nephews and niece were younger. Don't want to repeat that experience!

I just finished watching Rope, one of Alfred Hitchcock's exercises in filmmaking.

 

By "exercise," I mean that Hitchcock attempted to make the movie look like it was done in a continuous take, with the technology of the time. This meant that the actors were very extensively rehearsed, and the camera movements and set decorations were meticulously choreographed through the very long -- 10 minute -- takes. (Ten minutes' worth of film was all the cameras could hold.) Not only that, the set was gimmicked so that the walls would move to allow the cameras to follow the actors as they moved from room to room.

 

As for the story, it's about two guys, Brandon and Phillip, college students who begin the movie by strangling their best bud, David, to death, for the intellectual exercise of committing the "perfect" crime; Brandon, the self-professed intellectual, sees those like himself as being above conventional morality and notions of right and wrong, and believes they have the right to dispatch inferiors. Yes, Brandon is a sociopath, and a smug, supercilious one at that. Phillip is a lot more guilty and remorseful; he's clearly the follower, drawn into Brandon's warped sense of "fun."

 

Said fun includes the fact that they dispatched David just moments before a dinner party in their apartment. Not only that, they stuff the body into a large chest in the center of the living room, and place the food, plates and eating utensils on it! And the invited guests include David's father, mother and ex-girlfriend -- and her new boyfriend!

 

But the last guest is the old headmaster from their prep school. Clearly, Brandon wants to impress him because he's the kind of intellectual who would understand what they've done and why -- he espouses such theories of superiority all the time. 

 

It's a crackling good entertainment, all around. They don't make 'em like that any more!

Rope is one of my favorite Hitchcock films. It's great because it happens practically in real time with every word, every movement filled with tension for the two murderers. James Stewart plays their old headmaster, smug, charming, superior-minded and above it all, much as they see themselves.

It was based on the Leopold and Loeb case, another crime that has fascinated for decades.

Let's try this again:

Said fun includes the fact that they dispatched David just moments before a dinner party in their apartment. Not only that, they stuff the body into a large chest in the center of the living room, and place the food, plates and eating utensils on it! And the invited guests include David's father, mother and ex-girlfriend fiancee -- and her new ex-boyfriend!

 

 

Whom one of our merry murderers try to hook up again! Ah, romance!

ClarkKent_DC said:

Let's try this again:

Said fun includes the fact that they dispatched David just moments before a dinner party in their apartment. Not only that, they stuff the body into a large chest in the center of the living room, and place the food, plates and eating utensils on it! And the invited guests include David's father, mother and ex-girlfriend fiancee -- and her new ex-boyfriend!

 

 

"Compulsion" (1959) is another good movie based on the Leopold and Loeb case. Orson Welles is great as an attorney based on Clarence Darrow.

Re "Rope": Hitchcock used the "shooting a movie in one take" technique again, just a year later, in "Under Capricorn" (1949). It's one of the few Hitchcock movies I've never seen.

 

If you want to see a movie that really WAS shot in one take, see "Russian Ark" (2002). It's stunning and hypnotic.

The Time Traveler's Wife. I enjoyed this film more than I expected. The traveler can't control where or when he goes. The two main characters meet out of order. She keeps a diary of their meetings. Their first meeting from his perspective occurs in a library. All this is almost disturbingly familiar. There's even a little girl with red hair. Hmm. Still, like I said, I enjoyed the movie and would recommend it.
Scott Pilgrim vs the World. I really enjoyed it. It's a very different looking movie, with comics elements and video game elements. There's some manga and anime stuff going on, too. Not having read the comics the movie is based on, I can't say how accurate the translation is, but it's a fun just-short-of-two-hours.
I watched Jonah Hex. It was not a very good movie and bore little resemblance to the comics. The CGI Gatling guns on either side of Jonah's horse were just the beginning of my problems with it. It also looked as though the makers tried to attach themselves to the "red matter" of the Alias TV series and the 2009 Star Trek movie. The talking to the dead stuff came out of nowhere, too. See it if you get a chance, but don't go out of your way. I'd had it on the DVR for weeks before watching it last night. They might as well have made a Lobo movie. I hope they don't alter Jonah Hex in All-Star Western to bring him into line with the movie version.
it's pretty close. The books while not huge had a lot of backstory and expanded the stories. I think the whole saga takes place over a year at least that's what it seems like. The film was condensed with a few things changed.

PowerBook Pete (The Mad Mod) said:
Scott Pilgrim vs the World. I really enjoyed it. It's a very different looking movie, with comics elements and video game elements. There's some manga and anime stuff going on, too. Not having read the comics the movie is based on, I can't say how accurate the translation is, but it's a fun just-short-of-two-hours.

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