Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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The film's message is [SPOILER] that we would have helped them if they had only asked [END SPOILER]. Anyone her familiar with the 1941 novel upon which the film is based?

Amazon Prime is offering to rent me this movie for $1.99. I think I'll pass.

Regarding the book on which it is based, IMDB Trivia tells me (with a spoiler caution):

"Differences between the film and the book "The Gods Hate Kansas" it was based on: In the book, Doctor Temple is captured and the alien leader successfully removes his protective metal plate. The ensuing struggle between the two resembles something more like the Star Trek TOS episode "Star Trek: The Lights of Zetar (1969)" or The Exorcist (1973) than the kung fu commando battle in the movie. The book also gives us a look at the aliens as they might have been had their ancestors made different choices in the development of their culture. The contrast of the two alternative types of alien is similar to the contrast of the "invading women" daymare with the actual riim creatures of A.E. van Vogt's Voyage of the Space Beagle."

Regarding your Doctor Who comment:

"To save costs, the production used many sets and props from the Amicus movie Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D. (1966) filmed earlier."

"I think I'll pass."

Wise move.

"To save costs, the production used many sets and props from the Amicus movie Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D. (1966) filmed earlier."

I was going to say that! That was one of the things the production reminded me of. (Actually, Tracy said it and I agreed.) 

The film's message is [SPOILER] that we would have helped them if they had only asked [END SPOILER].

I forgot to comment on this message:

Yeah, we have a record of helping everyone even if they aren't "like us."

WARNING FROM SPACE (1956): "The citizens of Tokyo panic when they see UFOs in the sky. the aliens are benign, however, and have come to warn of a meteor on a collision course with Earth. As the meteor approaches, the Earth's atmosphere begins to heat up, and mankind must race to construct a weapon to destroy it."

The most striking thing about this movie (it is in color, BTW) is the design work. the aliens look like giant starfish in costumes made of bedsheets. Each is wearing some sort of eye-shaped device across the midsection. Dubbing by Peter Fernandez and the other usual suspects. 

I've got that one on disk, and have seen it recently.  The starfish costumes look lame now, but I remember parts of this movie - especially the transformation scenes - creeping me out when I was a little kid.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

WARNING FROM SPACE (1956): "The citizens of Tokyo panic when they see UFOs in the sky. the aliens are benign, however, and have come to warn of a meteor on a collision course with Earth. As the meteor approaches, the Earth's atmosphere begins to heat up, and mankind must race to construct a weapon to destroy it."

The most striking thing about this movie (it is in color, BTW) is the design work. the aliens look like giant starfish in costumes made of bedsheets. Each is wearing some sort of eye-shaped device across the midsection. Dubbing by Peter Fernandez and the other usual suspects. 

I'm pretty sure Dark Corners Reviews did a pretty hilarious review of that one recently. Made me want to see it.

Another largely forgotten film from the 70s I might be interested in re-watching just to see if holds up (not that it was a huge hit or anything): FM (1978). Despite denials, it feels like the unofficial pilot of WKRP in Cincinnati, resembling it in the same way that early Happy Days resembles American Graffiti (though the relationship there is tortuous) and Happy Days resembles Forbidden Planet.   Wikipedia notes: Marion "Captain Mikey" Herrington "inspired the fictional characters of program director Jeff Dugan in the 1978 movie FM, and program director Andy Travis on the 1980s television sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati." The respective actors playing those parts resemble each other uncannily, DJs Eric Swan and the Prince feel like earlier, edgier versions of Johnny Fever and Venus Flytrap, and I recall the plot feeling a little like episodes of the later show. I have not seen it since the 70s, however.

What.   Star Trek, maybe?

JD DeLuzio said:

 Despite denials, it feels like the unofficial pilot of WKRP in Cincinnati, resembling it in the same way that early Happy Days resembles American Graffiti (though the relationship there is tortuous) and Happy Days resembles Forbidden Planet.   

Yes... I meant Star Trek.   Although Mork did first appear on Happy Days. And the cartoon spin-off crossed into Doctor Who territory....

Yeah.... FM.... Another forgotten maybe-a-gem-but-I-suspect not.....

FM is a movie I never saw, but I did own the soundtrack album (on vinyl), a double. I bought it used but i don't have it anymore. I also have the soundtrack for Casino (on CD) but have never seen the movie.

THE PHANTOM PLANET (1961): "When an undiscovered planet appears in the solar syatem, Earth dispatches an expedition to investigate. They discover a race of tiny people who posess the technology to move their planet 'Rheton' from galaxy to galaxy to evade their enemies. Beset by attacks by giant monsters and the menacing solorites, they are aided by a surviving astronaut who helps them save the day."

The main character is played by "Hey, it's that guy!" actor Dean Fredericks, who played, among many other roles, Steve Canyon on TV.

His ship crash lands on the "Phantom Planet" (a small, asymmetrical asteroid, really), whose properties shrink him to six inches tall. There is a short "Gulliver's Travels" scene, but the size difference doesn't last long. After that, for the majority of the movie, you wouldn't know they're six inches tall. (It becomes a plot point towards the end, though, when it's time for him to return.) There is an effective scene of him, lying unconscious, shrinking inside his space suit while the spacesuit "deflates". 

He is immediately put on trail, found guilty, then freed and made a citizen (against his wishes). Although there are men in attendance at the trial, his jurors are all women. They don't say anything, however. They are each handed a small object by the bailiff, they listen to the testimony, the objects are collected and handed to the judge, who looks at them and declares the astronaut guilty. Then they file out of the courtyard.

The movie has five main characters. In addition to the astronaut, there is the leader of the aliens, his daughter, her lover, and another mute woman. After the trial, the astronaut is informed he will not be allowed to leave, but that he may select any woman he likes for a mate, including the leader's daughter or the mute woman. (And he was found guilty!) The astronaut and the daughter really hit it off, much to the consternation of her lover. The lover challenges the astronaut to a dual. The astronaut wins but spares his rival's life and they become friends. Later, during a moment of danger, the mute woman screams and discovers she now has the ability to speak and confesses her love for him.

After the astronaut helps the aliens defeat theie foes, the Solorites, his now-friend and the two women concoct a plan for him to regain his normal size and return to Earth. The ordeal knocks him out, however, and when he awakens he thinks the whole experience was an hallucination. But he has the memento the formerly mute woman gave him. 

This is one of those "serious" science fiction movies of the era; it at least tries to be a good movie with a message. In terms of production value, I would liken it to Teenagers from Outer Space or Rocketship X-M. The space battles use conventional sound effects for weapons (such as gunshots), and when a swarm of micro-meteors hits the hull of the ship early on they make ricochet noises. All in all, I found watching this film to be an enjoyable experience and would recommend it to anyone who likes campy B-movies. 

This is one that I know solely from its appearance on MST3K.   Interestingly, the other two pictures you mentioned, "Teenagers from Outer Space"  and "Rocketship X-M", both made their way to the Satellite of Love as well.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

THE PHANTOM PLANET (1961): "When an undiscovered planet appears in the solar syatem, Earth dispatches an expedition to investigate. They discover a race of tiny people who posess the technology to move their planet 'Rheton' from galaxy to galaxy to evade their enemies. Beset by attacks by giant monsters and the menacing solorites, they are aided by a surviving astronaut who helps them save the day."

The main character is played by "Hey, it's that guy!" actor Dean Fredericks, who played, among many other roles, Steve Canyon on TV.

His ship crash lands on the "Phantom Planet" (a small, asymmetrical asteroid, really), whose properties shrink him to six inches tall. There is a short "Gulliver's Travels" scene, but the size difference doesn't last long. After that, for the majority of the movie, you wouldn't know they're six inches tall. (It becomes a plot point towards the end, though, when it's time for him to return.) There is an effective scene of him, lying unconscious, shrinking inside his space suit while the spacesuit "deflates". 

He is immediately put on trail, found guilty, then freed and made a citizen (against his wishes). Although there are men in attendance at the trial, his jurors are all women. They don't say anything, however. They are each handed a small object by the bailiff, they listen to the testimony, the objects are collected and handed to the judge, who looks at them and declares the astronaut guilty. Then they file out of the courtyard.

The movie has five main characters. In addition to the astronaut, there is the leader of the aliens, his daughter, her lover, and another mute woman. After the trial, the astronaut is informed he will not be allowed to leave, but that he may select any woman he likes for a mate, including the leader's daughter or the mute woman. (And he was found guilty!) The astronaut and the daughter really hit it off, much to the consternation of her lover. The lover challenges the astronaut to a dual. The astronaut wins but spares his rival's life and they become friends. Later, during a moment of danger, the mute woman screams and discovers she now has the ability to speak and confesses her love for him.

After the astronaut helps the aliens defeat theie foes, the Solorites, his now-friend and the two women concoct a plan for him to regain his normal size and return to Earth. The ordeal knocks him out, however, and when he awakens he thinks the whole experience was an hallucination. But he has the memento the formerly mute woman gave him. 

This is one of those "serious" science fiction movies of the era; it at least tries to be a good movie with a message. In terms of production value, I would liken it to Teenagers from Outer Space or Rocketship X-M. The space battles use conventional sound effects for weapons (such as gunshots), and when a swarm of micro-meteors hits the hull of the ship early on they make ricochet noises. All in all, I found watching this film to be an enjoyable experience and would recommend it to anyone who likes campy B-movies. 

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