Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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I read this one when it was reprinted in an issue of Batman Family and thought that the Cluemaster was a major Bat-villain!

And in the 90s, he shockingly was!

Luke Blanchard said:

Gilberton's use of the author's real name surprises me. His byline was "Mark Twain" on the first edition. (I notice the book was copyrighted to "S. L. Clemens".)

Anyone who has seen the silly Danny Kaye movie and hasn't read the book should do so. The Yankee trying to explain disparate costs-of-living is entertaining. Mark's Twain's anti-war feelings are presented strongly in the hideous ending of the castle assault.

Philip Portelli said:

I read this one when it was reprinted in an issue of Batman Family and thought that the Cluemaster was a major Bat-villain!
And in the 90s, he shockingly was!

You beat me to the punch with this one, Cluemaster's first appearance.

His daughter, The Spoiler, broke a barrier in Big Two comics with her unwanted teenage pregnancy. The 90s had some good stuff.

Richard Willis said:

Anyone who has seen the silly Danny Kaye movie and hasn't read the book should do so. The Yankee trying to explain disparate costs-of-living is entertaining. Mark's Twain's anti-war feelings are presented strongly in the hideous ending of the castle assault.

Apparently Bing Crosby appeared in a musical version in 1949. Kaye starred in The Court Jester (1955), which isn't an adaptation. (That's the film with the pellet with the poison routine.)

The IMDB and Wikipedia tell me there's been quite a number of other movie and TV adaptations. Apparently Boris Karloff played King Arthur in two TV versions, one of which was a TV performance of a Rodgers and Hart stage musical.

Disney did a 1979 version called The Spaceman and King Arthur/Unidentified Flying Oddball. I've never seen the film, but I've a vague memory of reading Gold Key's adaptation in Walt Disney Showcase #52.

Let's not forget that before Cat-Woman came Cat-Man! Here's issue 7, from Feb 1942, also featuring Kitten; The Deacon and Mickey; Hurricane Harrigan and The Hood.  Cover pencils and inks by Charles Quinlan. 

A favorite of mine which, unfortunately, was never given a satisfactory conclusion.

Love that cover Jeff!  Definitely a stone among stones!

Here's a British one from me, since Britain seems to be a bit neglected so far this month.  This is CRIKEY! #9 from March 2009. The cover features the lovely Modesty Blaise who was a famous comic-strip heroine from the 60's, drawn by Enrique Romero.

Here's something a bit different:  Four Color #759 (December, 1956) with future Monkee Mickey Dolenz as Circus Boy.

I had a moment so I looked up Circus Boy on Wikipedia.  It had the following:

"Circus Boy is an American action/adventure/drama series that aired in prime time on NBC, and then on ABC, from 1956 to 1958. It was then rerun by NBC on Saturday mornings, from 1958 to 1960.

"Set in the late 1890s, the title of the series refers to a boy named Corky. After his parents, 'The Flying Falcons,' were killed in a trapeze accident, young Corky (Micky Dolenz – billed at the time as Mickey Braddock) was adopted by Joey the Clown (Noah Beery, Jr.), and the whole Burke and Walsh Circus family.

"The young boy quickly found a role with the circus as water boy to Bimbo, a baby elephant whom Corky would come to consider his pet. Riding Bimbo's back, Corky dealt with adolescent problems, and helped the show's adults including Joey, owner/promoter Big Tim Champion (Robert Lowery). and head canvasman Pete (Guinn Williams), keep the circus successful as the traveling show moved from town to town each week.

"Outside of an elephant being the animal companion, the series was similar to popular 'boy and his dog' shows of the time, such as Lassie/Jeff's Collie, and The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin."

Egads, "After his parents, 'The Flying Falcons,' were killed in a trapeze accident ..." where have we seen that before?

And considering that Robert Lowery played Batman in the second movie serial in 1949!

Dave Palmer said:

I had a moment so I looked up Circus Boy on Wikipedia.  It had the following:

"Circus Boy is an American action/adventure/drama series that aired in prime time on NBC, and then on ABC, from 1956 to 1958. It was then rerun by NBC on Saturday mornings, from 1958 to 1960.

"Set in the late 1890s, the title of the series refers to a boy named Corky. After his parents, 'The Flying Falcons,' were killed in a trapeze accident, young Corky (Micky Dolenz – billed at the time as Mickey Braddock) was adopted by Joey the Clown (Noah Beery, Jr.), and the whole Burke and Walsh Circus family.

"The young boy quickly found a role with the circus as water boy to Bimbo, a baby elephant whom Corky would come to consider his pet. Riding Bimbo's back, Corky dealt with adolescent problems, and helped the show's adults including Joey, owner/promoter Big Tim Champion (Robert Lowery). and head canvasman Pete (Guinn Williams), keep the circus successful as the traveling show moved from town to town each week.

"Outside of an elephant being the animal companion, the series was similar to popular 'boy and his dog' shows of the time, such as Lassie/Jeff's Collie, and The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin."

Egads, "After his parents, 'The Flying Falcons,' were killed in a trapeze accident ..." where have we seen that before?

I don't remember hearing about Circus Boy before. It's amazing that Mickey Dolenz as an adult looked exactly the same.

The Batman villain Catman's first appearance. Since the Comics Code at the time apparently had a problem with the Catwoman character, they came up with this guy, who is still rattling around. At least he had a different backstory.

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