Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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The 1960 version

Another movie I liked, although I have noticed that nowadays, hardly any comic book company does a movie adaptation any more unless it's of their own properties.

Images courtesy of the Grand Comics Database.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

I have noticed that nowadays, hardly any comic book company does a movie adaptation any more unless it's of their own properties.

I'm pretty sure that's because there are no comic racks outside comic stores. No general public customers.

...and talking of Mad...

And because of the number of covers I still have left, I'm committed to posting 2 covers a day for the last 7 days of February.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

I have noticed that nowadays, hardly any comic book company does a movie adaptation any more unless it's of their own properties.

Richard Willis said:

I'm pretty sure that's because there are no comic racks outside comic stores. No general public customers.

I think it's more likely that comic book companies are owned by bigger conglomerates that want to cross-promote their own properties, not some other company's. Heck, Marvel downgraded the Fantastic Four and the X-Men because Fox held the movie rights to the characters.



Richard Willis said:

Lee Houston, Junior said:

I have noticed that nowadays, hardly any comic book company does a movie adaptation any more unless it's of their own properties.

I'm pretty sure that's because there are no comic racks outside comic stores. No general public customers.

A day there was when Dell and Gold Key adapted all manner of film and TV properties, even if they were largely forgettable:



Strange forms of movie-making.

What a good job that the "Death-Ray Camera" is so carefully labelled.  Without that warning notice, it would just be an accident waiting to happen!

If we assume that these movie-makers are filming in outer space, how does the microphone on a pole work?  Is the director's megaphone supposed to allow him to shout "cut" at the space serpent?

With this cover, I just want to know how the cameramen got up there, and what's preventing them from falling off or floating away.

This 1960 movie has two dinosaurs in suspended animation since the "stone age" struck by lightning on a Caribbean island. Conflicting accounts say that Steve McQueen was considered for the lead role. He made The Blob for the same company two years earlier. He was either "too difficult" so they didn't ask him or he passed to make The Magnificent Seven

Famously, the USA and the USSR both took in German rocket scientists (I won't say Nazi because I don't know which if any of them were actually Nazis). I can't help but say that the movie title should have had a subtitle: ....but Sometimes I Hit London.

I love the space program. And yet...



Richard Willis said:

Famously, the USA and the USSR both took in German rocket scientists (I won't say Nazi because I don't know which if any of them were actually Nazis). I can't help but say that the movie title should have had a subtitle: ....but Sometimes I Hit London.

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