Views: 53441

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

From The Durango Kid #41 (ME, 1955). Apparently, someone didn't think only kids read comics. Compare the joke ad from Marvel Super Special #1 (p.363 of this thread).


A crowd turns ugly.

From "The Atom", Flash Comics #80.


It's Richard Boone!

From "A Trap for the Sheriff!", Six-Gun Western #3 (Marvel, 1957). Art by Gene Colan.

Boone was the star of the TV Western Have Gun - Will Travel. But according to Wikipedia that didn't start until Sep. 1957, and DC Indexes says this issue went on sale in Feb. 1957. So his appearance here was presumably inspired either by his movie Westerns or the TV show's pre-appearance publicity.

"But according to Wikipedia that didn't start until Sep. 1957..."

I have always heard that Gene Colan based his version of Dracula for Marvel's Tomb of Dracula on the likeness of actor Jack Palance. Jack Palance did star in the Dan Curtis (of Dark Shadows fame), but it was obnly recently (okay, fairly recently) I learned that the movie didn't come out until two years after the debut of the comic book. Colan's layouts are often said to be "cinematic." He would have made a fair Hollywood casting agent. 

Jack Palance and Richard Boone both did TV and movie work beginning in 1949 (both on TV in 1949!). Palance notably was the main bad guy in the classic western Shane (1953). Richard Boone played bad guy Johnny Ringo in City of Bad Men (also 1953). The character in the comic panel is apparently a bad guy, so there you go.

There's a catch! Net images tell me he didn't have his moustache in that one. He had it by The Tall T (1957), but that was released in Apr, also too late. 

The panel has the look of an image drawn from a photo reference. Perhaps it was a pre-release image from The Tall T. Boone's costume in that movie included a jacket that reminds me of Colan's, but it was waste-length.

Gene Colan talked about casting Palance as Dracula in his Comic Book Artist interview, here.


From All-American Western #126.


From All-American Western #126.

"For the greatest double-feature in comics history".

"For the greatest double-feature in comics history".

I see what you did there.

Odd that they treated this 1952 team-up as a special event since they had been teamed-up in World's Finest for over a decade. Lois is such a challenge that it takes both to save her?

Luke Blanchard said:


From All-American Western #126.



Richard Willis said:

Odd that they treated this 1952 team-up as a special event since they had been teamed-up in World's Finest for over a decade. Lois is such a challenge that it takes both to save her?

Although they certainly met in the Golden Age-- including a cameo with the Justice Society-- the early World's Finest team-ups were limited to the cover. Regular in-story team-ups did not begin in World's Finest until #71 (1954).

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service