Anybody play D&D? Played D&D?

 

My comic shop hosts D&D encounters every Wednesday. The newest session is starting up soon. I've never played D&D in my life but have been curious about it. Tonight was character creation. I  sat down with one of the DMs and created a Changeling thief. I'm looking forward to the first adventure next week. Not sure if it's something I'll stick with but I thought I'd give it a shot. I even bought a set of dice tonight as well.

 

Any tips for a rookie?

 

If you play do you have a particular type of character you prefer? Did I make the right decision with the Changeling thief?

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"The Only Right Move, is Not to  Play...."   (Joshua, the Whopper Computer in  War Games, the movie)

Have I played D&D? Yes, indeed, good sir!

(Bragging mode) I've even written official adventures for the game! And then when they stopped taking my calls, I wrote a few non official things! Go on, look me up! Okay, I'll make it easy for you: Dungeon 105Dungeon 110 and Dungeon 118 (/Bragging mode)

Some advice on survival:

  • Never volunteer to open a door or a chest. Unless they make you.
  • Never go first. That's the ranger's job.
  • In a maze, always turn right. Eventually, you'll find your way out.
  • If someone seems friendly, they're actually the villain. Kill them immediately.
  • Once in a while, tell your DM you rolled a 538 on the d20. Then you'll know if he's paying attention.
  • If you're talking in character, adopt a Scottish accent. It's mandatory. Really.
  • Stay close to the cleric. You'll live longer.
  • Always be the last one to get into flanking position. You'll live longer.
  • If your DM kills you, remember it's not personal. But your next character should be especially annoying.
  • Treat monks nicely, because they'll be the first ones to die.
  • Treat halflings nicely, because they like punching people in the nuts.

He is playing a thief, so he will at least be checking traps on the doors and chests. He will be on point.

Jason, I am assuming you are playing 4E? If so, I have noticed that thieves take quite a bit of punishment. They are generally melee, but have weak armor and low HPs. You may have made a range guy, I'm not intimately familiar with the class. Flank as much as you can to get the extra dice on for backstabbing. Also, insist that you keep track of the group treasure.

Personally, there isn't anything specific I like. I like to change it up often. I have friends who play the exact same thing in every campaign. I did like that they took a lot of the restrictions off of Paladins in 4E, so I played one of those.

I do agree above with stay close/be nice to the cleric.

Think outside of the box to really make the DM when scramble when you or the party do something unexpected.

When you introduce yourself in character, do NOT include your race, class, level, or alignment. I once played with a guy who actually said,"Hi, I'm Fred a human ranger, and I am aligned with good"

If you haven't picked your languages yet make sure to pick Goblinoid. I find that is the most useful.

I stand by my advice. ;)  He's not trying to be a hero, he's trying to survive and make off with a shit-ton of loot.

Thanks, Travis and LJ.

It is 4e. When it was described to me thieves are stealth characters not melee. I could be wrong though.

 

I did not pick goblinoid for my language. In this version everyone speaks common but I did choose my character to be a changeling becommer which means I got to pick another race I was an expert in impersonating. I picked draconic because I thought it'd be cool to be a dragon. Though it was recommened to that goblin may be the one I'd used the most.

 

I appreciate the comments. This is something I'm just trying out so I want to just have fun.

 

Is there a particular edition you guys prefer?

Also this thread isn't just meant for me. It can be the catch all D&D thread.

Yeah everyone speaks common, but everyone gets to pick a second language as well. You are stealthy for sure, but once combat starts the rest of your party will expect you to mix it up, and not just run around sneakily. Just make sure you wait until you tank (probably a fighter or paladin) engages first, even if you have to delay your action.

I played 1st, 2nd, and 4th edition. I never got Third or 3.5. Some people hated 4th edition so much that that they continued 3.4 on their own and that became the game Pathfinder. For me, I go with the roll on the rules. It is about hanging with my friends, going on cool adventures, and having fun. A good DM makes all of the difference, they make games with crappy rules fun.

That being said I really like the powers set-up in 4E  (at-will, encounter, and daily powers) that really allows everyone a chance to shine in combat (assuming you roll good). Whereas in earlier editions of D&D, wizards were very underpowered in the early levels and over powered in later levels. Much more even playing field here I think. Overall, I think the magic items in earlier editions were better. They did improve some in the current edition though with the latter books.

I didn't get asked about my second language. It was more associated with my becommer status. I guess I can speak that language and can give battle damage as that class when I'm in that form.

 

It was gone over who goes into battle first and what each class's role was. I guess when needed I make quick strikes with acrobatic skills and what not.

 

I got more caught up in making a cool character rather thinking how exactly it'd benefit me in the game.

What is a good example of an introduction? I want to at least give a hint that I know what I'm doing. Of course this is a Wizards of the Coast event so everyone is starting at level 1.
 
Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

 

When you introduce yourself in character, do NOT include your race, class, level, or alignment. I once played with a guy who actually said,"Hi, I'm Fred a human ranger, and I am aligned with good"

 

It's a good idea to come up with some sort of back story, some sort of reason why you're choosing to be an adventurer. For instance, when I first started I was running a ranger named Kilroy, who was searching for the murderer of his parents and figured he'd have a better chance of finding them by going off on an adventure.

The story can also help you with your alignment.

Also--and I know it's satire--some good examples of character introduction can be found in Knights Of The Dinner Table.

Jason Marconnet (Pint sized mod) said:

What is a good example of an introduction? I want to at least give a hint that I know what I'm doing. Of course this is a Wizards of the Coast event so everyone is starting at level 1.
 
Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

 

When you introduce yourself in character, do NOT include your race, class, level, or alignment. I once played with a guy who actually said,"Hi, I'm Fred a human ranger, and I am aligned with good"

 

Oh yeah, make sure you understand how to calculate your modifiers.  When I first started playing I kept wondering why my 18 strength heavily armored fighter was doing so little damage in battle, and of course it was because I wasn't adding together all of his modifiers.

Oh yeah. The DM doing the character creation with me went into detail on all the modifiers and what not. It didn't make a whole lot of sense to me. I figure I'll pick it up. Fortunatley it seems that the people that play weekly in this event are pretty friendly and helpful. The DM seems like a nice enough guy as well. They seem open to new folks and will probably help me out to start. I don't expect them to hold my hand the whole way though.

And thanks for your help, too Randy

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