Who's your favorite Post Silver Age Batman villain.  Not necessarily the best or the brightest, but the one you enjoy reading about the most?

Since most people here have different ideas on when the Silver Age ended, let's say for this particular post that it's around the time that Denny O'Neil started writing the stories.

For me, I'm going to go with the Ventriloquist.  Sure R'as Al Ghul is more popular, but I've always found him annoying in many ways.  However, something about a Ventriloquist who's also a crime boss really appeals to me.

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That’s a good question. I’m not particularly enamored with any of the post-Silver Age/pre-Crisis villains. Of the post-Crisis ones, the ones which have become official additions to Batman’s rogues’ gallery tend to be over-used. The ones I like best tend to be one-shot villains, but that’s more plot-driven than character-driven. Hmm… I’ll have to give it some thought.

I do have a soft spot fro the team of Mastermind, the Perfesser and Mr. Nice, created for the DC Animated Universe.  A trio of criminals so utterly and terribly incompetent they were quite fun.

The Ten-Eyed Man, in his original two Frank Robbins/Irv Novick stories (where he didn't have a costume, was very capable, and was out to blind Batman because he blamed him for his loss of normal sight).

Yes, that started out as a pretty decent story...then the whole "ten-eyed" thing happened and it took on epic levels of awfulness.

Luke Blanchard said:

The Ten-Eyed Man, in his original two Frank Robbins/Irv Novick stories (where he didn't have a costume, was very capable, and was out to blind Batman because he blamed him for his loss of normal sight).

Why?

Robin Olsen said:

Killer Croc.

Joker, al la "The Sign of the Laughing Fish"

Randy Jackson said:

Yes, that started out as a pretty decent story...then the whole "ten-eyed" thing happened and it took on epic levels of awfulness.

The ten eyes element doesn't violate my I-can-buy-that or silliness boundaries the way it seems to for many others, so for me the two issues have interesting details and a formidable, partly-sympathetic antagonist. I didn't like the story from Man-Bat #2, where he was turned into a costumed super-opponent.

I think I enjoyed the first issue with the Spook I read, but all I really remember about it today is Jason Bard's role in the story. The Spook story I have today, in which he tricks Batman into believing he (Batman) is dead, I found too far-fetched.

Ra's al Ghul has added a pretty cool villain and legacy to the Batman mythos. But that having been said, I really like the idea behind Hush. Sure, he's a "new, made-up" guy from Batman's history (who is now ten years old...), but he also had a really great story as "Bruce Wayne" while Bruce was back in time, and I really dig him. I associate him more with Dustin Nguyen than I do with his creator, Jim Lee.

If the Joker doesn't qualify, then I think "Man-Bat" is both my favorite, and initially, disappointing.  The artwork can't be beat!

Ra's Al Ghul and Talia add so much depth to Batman's world. The stories that feature them usually are epics that span around the Earth, making Batman far more than a crimefighter of a single city. He's like a masked James Bond.

Killer Croc had a great first storyline that last several months. This was Croc in his original form, cursed with a horrible skin condition, devastatingly strong, cunny and ruthless. All the Bat-foes unite under him out of fear! Including the Joker who betrayed him! Unfortunately they turned him first into a psychopathic bruiser then a Lizard-clone.

Yeah, I'm with you on this one.

George Poague said:

All the villains (Joker, Hugo Strange, etc.) in the Steve Englehart-Marshall Rogers issues of Detective.

Phiollip Portelli:

"He's like a masked James Bond."

That's somewhat true. On the other hand, shouldn't the goal be to do a good "Batman" story than a 3rd-generation-removed "James Bond" story?

In the last 20 years, it's often seemed to me that DC, more and more, gave up on all their other characters, instead incessantly expanding their focus on Batman and Superman (mostly Batman because of both the movies and cartoons series). I recall a seemingly-endless succession of "Elseworlds" stories, all starring infinite versions of someone called "Batman". And this, while simultaneously INSISTING that there was no more "Multiverse", that there was "only one" DC Earth, and that, even if there were countless alternate continuities, NONE of them was "Earth-1"!

When Steve Englehart, Marshall Rogers & Terry Austin reunited for DARK DETECTIVE, most younger fans seemed completley oblivious that Steve was writing brand-new stories SET on "Earth-1".  (And apparently, once the powers that be at DC figured it out, they pulled the plug on the 2nd half of the intended run.)

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