Not E.C. Segar but an incredible simulation!

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...I bought it too , have barely opened/glanced  yet , noted the " retro "-ness extended to being laid out similar to a Golden Age " reprinting strips " comic !!!!!!!

...I read 3@today, I LAUGHED! I can't afford very many Comicks these days,Dudes,but I liked this!!!!!

OhWhata Schnozzole:-)!!!!!!!

That Was Supposed to be "#2" Up There:-(.Dude.

Too often the term “all ages” means “for children,” but IDW’s Popeye is truly and “all ages" comic!

It is...but, man, it seems so old-fashioned that I can't imagine most kids today being very interested.  I understand the love the current guys have for Segar, but...wow.  I'm actually looking forward more to the reprint series coming later this summer with all of the Bud Sagendorf comic stories.

I just read issue one over the weekend and didn't much like it.

I appreciate the old stuff ... I read a ton of it, actually. But I don't want to pay modern prices for such a tiny bit of old-style comic book. I want a lot more for my money.

This is not something that would appeal to kids whatsoever. It isn't dynamic enough, quite frankly. I recognized immediately that it's art was mimicking the classic style, and that just isn't going to impress any kid. For example, the entire comic was drawn in a "medium shot," and boy does that get boring. Maybe it works on a daily, but not all stacked up like that.

There's two ways to do a retro comic and make it successful:

1) Copy the old style art and give it a gripping story.

2) Copy the old writing style and give it amazing art.

This mixed the two, copying the old art and the old story-telling style, and delivered a product that will only appeal to people that haven't got enough Popeye comics from all the reprint books we've been getting.

Artwise, give me someone like Tracey Yardley! , Mike Kunkel or even Sergio Argones. If you want the old look, then line up a writer like Peter David (I think he's done Popeye before!), Kurt Busiek or, for some weird stuff, Jeff Lemire.

My twitter review for it was: "Popeye No. 1 (2012): A very traditional Popeye tale that suffers from its singular visual perspective. I would like some occasional closeups"

...The daily strip has been reprinted.....colorized??.....Bud Sagendof reprints since some time in H. W. Bush's administrafion , IIRC . Where do they date from ? Has it been long enough thag they.re re.reprinting them by now ? Re.re.reprinfing ? I.ve wondered this - and azked it around ths Web - for years , and have nevder received a reply .

Lumbering Jack said:

I just read issue one over the weekend and didn't much like it.

I appreciate the old stuff ... I read a ton of it, actually. But I don't want to pay modern prices for such a tiny bit of old-style comic book. I want a lot more for my money.

This is not something that would appeal to kids whatsoever. It isn't dynamic enough, quite frankly. I recognized immediately that it's art was mimicking the classic style, and that just isn't going to impress any kid. For example, the entire comic was drawn in a "medium shot," and boy does that get boring. Maybe it works on a daily, but not all stacked up like that.

There's two ways to do a retro comic and make it successful:

1) Copy the old style art and give it a gripping story.

2) Copy the old writing style and give it amazing art.

This mixed the two, copying the old art and the old story-telling style, and delivered a product that will only appeal to people that haven't got enough Popeye comics from all the reprint books we've been getting.

Artwise, give me someone like Tracey Yardley! , Mike Kunkel or even Sergio Argones. If you want the old look, then line up a writer like Peter David (I think he's done Popeye before!), Kurt Busiek or, for some weird stuff, Jeff Lemire.

My twitter review for it was: "Popeye No. 1 (2012): A very traditional Popeye tale that suffers from its singular visual perspective. I would like some occasional closeups"

I think you guys are selling today's kids short. Older kids might not care for it, but if it were presented to a young kid without a negative spin (i.e., "old-fashioned"), I think it would appeal to them. What adults see as old-fashioned will be seen as fresh and unique in a child's eyes. I'm thinking particulary of the dialogue, but good storytelling never goes out of style. I would have loved this series when I was five or six!

And EKDJ, I'm not certain exactly which reprint series Bill is referring to, but there has been one hardcover collection from IDW's "Yoe Books" imprint which collects Sagendorf Popeye comic book stories.

Later this summer, IDW is starting an ongoing, monthly Popeye title which will reprint, in its entirety, the Sagendorf Popeye comics.

..Sagendorf.s comic books? ,
Admittedly , even for such a fan of thw comic vook format as I , that appears a little pointless in this book-format era . BTW , what do you guys think of the oft.repeated idea that early Popeye , Segar.s and the original Fleisher cartoons , has sort of " hints/" overtones " of bohemian lifestyles on a non-rich level/drug culture ? If it is true at all , is it true more of the Fleishers then Segar.s strips ? And now REALLY threadjacking but I.m on my smartphone and can.t access old lines and its. about another KFS strip the Commercial Appeal carries anywah , anybody seen the MA

Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

Later this summer, IDW is starting an ongoing, monthly Popeye title which will reprint, in its entirety, the Sagendorf Popeye comics.

Like I said , the MALLARD FILLMORE strip , which I don.t generally see , today ????????? It.s an odd example of " comics-about-comics " . Ob , a.d does anyone bave anh opknion/memory about George Wildman.s 70s versiln of Popeye for Charlton ? One " lesser " member herd whom I know better elsewhere has called it an " undiscovered classic " or similar .

Emerkeith Davyjack said:
..Sagendorf.s comic books? , Admittedly , even for such a fan of thw comic vook format as I , that appears a little pointless in this book-format era . BTW , what do you guys think of the oft.repeated idea that early Popeye , Segar.s and the original Fleisher cartoons , has sort of " hints/" overtones " of bohemian lifestyles on a non-rich level/drug culture ? If it is true at all , is it true more of the Fleishers then Segar.s strips ? And now REALLY threadjacking but I.m on my smartphone and can.t access old lines and its. about another KFS strip the Commercial Appeal carries anywah , anybody seen the MA

Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

Later this summer, IDW is starting an ongoing, monthly Popeye title which will reprint, in its entirety, the Sagendorf Popeye comics.

Lumbering Jack said:

It isn't dynamic enough, quite frankly. I recognized immediately that it's art was mimicking the classic style, and that just isn't going to impress any kid. For example, the entire comic was drawn in a "medium shot," and boy does that get boring.

I respectfully disagree. I’ve given your critique a lot of thought over the last three weeks and applied it to the third issue. I think yours is an interesting observation, but not a valid criticism. Yes, I admit the majority of the comic is drawn in a medium shot, but each and every panel is bursting with stored kinetic energy ready to be released. Yes, it does mimic the classic style, but there is quite a bit of dynamism present on every page. I see IDW’s Popeye as a perfect amalgam of the old and the new, an example of true cartooning at its finest.

Lumbering Jack said:

I just read issue one over the weekend and didn't much like it.

I appreciate the old stuff ... I read a ton of it, actually. But I don't want to pay modern prices for such a tiny bit of old-style comic book. I want a lot more for my money.

This is not something that would appeal to kids whatsoever. It isn't dynamic enough, quite frankly. I recognized immediately that it's art was mimicking the classic style, and that just isn't going to impress any kid. For example, the entire comic was drawn in a "medium shot," and boy does that get boring. Maybe it works on a daily, but not all stacked up like that.

There's two ways to do a retro comic and make it successful:

1) Copy the old style art and give it a gripping story.

2) Copy the old writing style and give it amazing art.

This mixed the two, copying the old art and the old story-telling style, and delivered a product that will only appeal to people that haven't got enough Popeye comics from all the reprint books we've been getting.

Artwise, give me someone like Tracey Yardley! , Mike Kunkel or even Sergio Argones. If you want the old look, then line up a writer like Peter David (I think he's done Popeye before!), Kurt Busiek or, for some weird stuff, Jeff Lemire.

 

My twitter review for it was: "Popeye No. 1 (2012): A very traditional Popeye tale that suffers from its singular visual perspective. I would like some occasional closeups"

I think you would have liked Bobby London's take on Popeye in the 1980s. I thoroughly enjoyed this collection, Mondo Popeye, Unfortunately, he ran afoul of King Features Syndicate with this unpublished series of strips (see here).

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