2020 ended (DEC) with a conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn. 2021 began (FEB 11) with a conjunction of Jupiter and Venus. Even in these days of social distancing, star gazing is distant enough. Here's a preview of some of the top astronomical events of 2021.

MARCH 9-10: Quadruple conjunction

MARCH 28: First of four supermoons

APRIL 18-25: Lyrid meteor shower

APRIL 27: Second of four supermoons 

MAY 26: Third of four supermoons; also...

MAY 26: Total lunar eclipse

JUNE 10: Annular solar eclipse

JUNE 24: Fourth of four supermoons

JULY 12: Conjunction of Venus and Mars

AUGUST 11-12: Perseid meteor shower

NOVEMBER 19: Partial lunar eclipse

DECEMBER 4: Total solar eclipse

DECEMBER 13-14: Geminid meteor shower

More details to follow as these dates approach.

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      Astronomy over astrology? How refreshing!

MARCH 9-10: QUADRUPLE CONJUNCTION:

On March 9-10, an extra-special "quadruple conjunction" will leave a group of planets splayed across the night sky. Look to the southeast around a half hour before sunrise, and you'll see Mercury, Saturn and Jupiter in a perfect line from bottom left to top right. All three will be visible with the naked eye in the predawn sky, with Jupiter being the brightest in the middle. the crescent moon will add to the trio, lurking below and to the right. 

Venus will be a little bit late to the party, rising in the Northern Hemisphere at the same time as the sun. those at the mid-latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere will have about fifteen minutes to spot Venus and other planets together before the sunrise washes them away.

Really cool, but you lost me at "a half hour before sunrise."

Jeff of Earth-J said:

MARCH 9-10: QUADRUPLE CONJUNCTION:

On March 9-10, an extra-special "quadruple conjunction" will leave a group of planets splayed across the night sky. Look to the southeast around a half hour before sunrise, and you'll see Mercury, Saturn and Jupiter in a perfect line from bottom left to top right. All three will be visible with the naked eye in the predawn sky, with Jupiter being the brightest in the middle. the crescent moon will add to the trio, lurking below and to the right. 

Venus will be a little bit late to the party, rising in the Northern Hemisphere at the same time as the sun. those at the mid-latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere will have about fifteen minutes to spot Venus and other planets together before the sunrise washes them away.

Ha!

I'll be up, and I should be able to see them if they make it above the treeline.

My view to the south from my backyard is mostly unobstructed but, depending on how low on the horizon, the view to the south east and southwest is obstructed by a row of houses. Same thing from the street in front, with the addition of streetlights. It was a moot point this morning, however, because the early morning sky was completely obscured by cloud cover. Will try again tomorrow.

Cloudy again today. :(

I hope someone here got to see the quadruple convergence. 

VERNAL EGUINOX: Today is the Vernal Equinox, one of two days in the year when the Sun is exactly above the Equator, and day and night are of equal length. Whereas there is nothing to "see," this is one of those things for which I describe myself as a "man of faith." That is, I cannot measure the distance from the Earth to the Moon myself, nor measure the speed of light, I accept those facts as a matter of faith

I was going to make an Ernest P. Worrell joke, but it was too awful even for me.

Ernest P. Worrell or Bartles & Jaymes?

Awesome!
Thanks, Vern!

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