I know that Andrew and Rich didn't, to put it mildly, enjoy this run. I read the first collection this past weekend and I have to say...I had a pretty great time with it. Millar did not know how to write Reed and Sue in his Civil War storyline, that's for sure, but now I wonder if the editorial need to have a break-up in Marvel's first family forced those bad characterizations because they are written very well here. Reed's first flame, Alyssa Moy, shows up married and calling herself "Mrs. Fantastic" and I cringed...afraid that discord was on the way...but it didn't happen. This time, Reed and Sue are too strong for any petty temptations or recriminations. Ben was Ben. Some readers didn't like his forwardness in asking out the teacher of a kindergarten class he was visiting, but c'mon, by this time Ben has to be comfortable enough in his skin to approach someone for a date. Johnny was a bit more "thinkin' with little Johnny" than usual...but he was pretty much the Chris Evans character from the films.

The big ideas are BIG and fun and I'm looking forward to the second collection. Oh...and I'm enjoying the new Hickman FF as well...

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Characterizations (outside of Doom) didn't bother about this book too much. It was the nonsensical storylines and utter lack of regard for conventions of good writing that got me.
As far as I'm concerned, the entire run is a Mopee. Really, I was expecting simple stories with big dumb explosions and such because that's what Millar does best, but the characterization was terrible, as were the stories.
I think Nu-Earth is showing up in Hickman's run...

I think I may just be easier than you guys...

...wait...
Yeah...573 has Johnny, Ben, Val, and Franklin head to Nu Earth to hang with the refugees from the future...no Mopee...
If people like a book I don't, I never want to give the impression of trying to dissuade them from their position. Heck, they got more for their money than I did. Still, I can't imagine how anyone enjoyed this run for anything beyond the purty pictures. I thought the whole concept of Nu Earth absolutely reduced the concept of suspension of disbelief to free floating literary atoms, and Millar twice, TWICE, used the writing shorthand of showing the bad guys amongst the fallen bodies all the heroes of the world to save himself from actually writing something that indicated his villains were badasses. And he cheated in a way that can by no stretch be considered clever when he titled an arc "Death of the Invisible Woman."

And let's not even start on the capture of Galactus...off frickin' panel...and expecting us to buy into it.
Rich Lane said:
If people like a book I don't, I never want to give the impression of trying to dissuade them from their position. Heck, they got more for their money than I did. Still, I can't imagine how anyone enjoyed this run for anything beyond the purty pictures. I thought the whole concept of Nu Earth absolutely reduced the concept of suspension of disbelief to free floating literary atoms, and Millar twice, TWICE, used the writing shorthand of showing the bad guys amongst the fallen bodies all the heroes of the world to save himself from actually writing something that indicated his villains were badasses. And he cheated in a way that can by no stretch be considered clever when he titled an arc "Death of the Invisible Woman."

And let's not even start on the capture of Galactus...off frickin' panel...and expecting us to buy into it.

And here I thought "Death of the Invisible Woman" was clever...silly me. ;)
Nah. If you enjoyed it, you enjoyed it. Again, different tastes are what make the world fun.

Doc Beechler said:
Rich Lane said:
If people like a book I don't, I never want to give the impression of trying to dissuade them from their position. Heck, they got more for their money than I did. Still, I can't imagine how anyone enjoyed this run for anything beyond the purty pictures. I thought the whole concept of Nu Earth absolutely reduced the concept of suspension of disbelief to free floating literary atoms, and Millar twice, TWICE, used the writing shorthand of showing the bad guys amongst the fallen bodies all the heroes of the world to save himself from actually writing something that indicated his villains were badasses. And he cheated in a way that can by no stretch be considered clever when he titled an arc "Death of the Invisible Woman."

And let's not even start on the capture of Galactus...off frickin' panel...and expecting us to buy into it.

And here I thought "Death of the Invisible Woman" was clever...silly me. ;)
Rich Lane said:
And he cheated in a way that can by no stretch be considered clever when he titled an arc "Death of the Invisible Woman"

I didn't read it and probably never will ... so can someone "spoil" it for me? What happened in this arc?
John Dunbar said:
Rich Lane said:
And he cheated in a way that can by no stretch be considered clever when he titled an arc "Death of the Invisible Woman"

I didn't read it and probably never will ... so can someone "spoil" it for me? What happened in this arc?

Spoilers...

Alyssa Moy and her new husband, Dr. Castle, had calculated that the Earth had about a decade before environmental collapse...so, through a dimensional portal, they and a bunch of very rich, super-smart people were making Nu Earth...one for only the most intelligent, powerful, and rich humans without weapons, police, armies, etc. Susan Richards travels back in time from 500 years in our future, where the humans who were left are stuck on what was left of the planet, to allow these humans to move over to Nu Earth instead of the self-appointed elite. Sue was kept alive by Reed's science and was the only one of the four left. She had formed a team, the new Defenders, which includes Logan and Bruce Banner's son. They kidnap Doom and the Torch to use them, along with Galactus, as a battery to time and space-shift the billions of future humans over. After all of this happens...Doom kills future Sue for using him in such a way...
Doc Beechler said:
She had formed a team, the new Defenders, which includes Logan and Bruce Banner's son.

Whoa! Logan and Bruce Banner had a son together? How'd they explain that?
Well, it was late, and Bruce found Logan sad, but powerful...
Alan M. said:
Well, it was late, and Bruce found Logan sad, but powerful...

HAW! HAW! HAW!

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