After being cancelled in 1972, the Teen Titans made a couple of appearances in Brave & Bold as its members went their separate ways. However during the 52 and 100 Pagers, several of their stories were reprinted, most with that gorgeous Nick Cardy art. After sales and letters of DC Super-Star #1 and Super Team Family #1 and #7 came in, DC was convinced to give the Fab More-Than-Four another shot, reviving the series with #44 (N'76).

They reunited Robin, Kid Flash, Wonder GirlSpeedy and Mal, supposedly not seeing each for two years. And not being with Speedy since his drug addiction from Green Lantern/Green Arrow #85-86 (S-N'71), despite their early 70s Teen Titans and B&B adventures! Kid Flash and Speedy immediately start rutting as soon as they see Wonder Girl who plays along. Mal is upset that he's been tending to the Titans HQ all by himself even though he volunteered to do so! He namedrops Lilith, Gnarrk, Hawk and Dove as "whatever Happened To...".

But their reunion was all a trap by DOCTOR LIGHT whose weaponry (and dumb luck, to be honest) allows him to capture Robin and Wonder Girl and escape. This causes the other three to snipe at each other and split up.

Doctor Light tortures them to get the coordinates of the Justice League Satellite (of Love) so he can destroy it with a giant, orbiting magnifying glass (no, seriously!) then captures Kid Flash and Speedy separately, gathers them up and polishes off the Flash way too quickly.

Mal, angry about being left behind, goes through the other Titans' trophy cases and gets a super-strength giving exo-skeleton (from Batman #192) and the costume, helmet and shield of the Golden Age Guardian, thus becoming the Guardian II (or III, depending on the Golden Guardian from Jimmy Olsen). He flies the Titans' mini-rocket to the JLA Satellite, distracts Doctor Light, frees the other Titans and saves the day. The Titans decide to stay together!

The story was uneven and the art was rough. No one looked good here. Kid Flash and Speedy were more concerned about scoring with Wonder Girl, Wonder Girl keeps forgetting that she has super-strength, no way Robin tells any of this to Batman and Mal...

Well, I liked Mal as Guardian but it took him two years to realize that he needed to step up his game to hang with the Titans? Really?

Mister Jupiter gets referenced but Aqualad does NOT! 

The text page was interesting as it mentions Beast Boy though he wasn't a member. And hints that Hawk & Dove may have retired.

Next: Just Call Me Angel of the Mourning! OR Blow It Out Your Ear!

Views: 3214

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Back_Issue_106/6_RjDwAAQBAJ?hl...

if I did that correctly it should link to an article by John Wells in Back Issue #106 that covers the creation of Air Wave.

Richard Willis said:

It occurs to me that these family connections driven by surnames may have been inspired by the Green Hornet radio show revealing that Britt Reid was related to John Reid, the Lone Ranger.

I wonder if this connection was planned when the Green Hornet was created or was it yet another writer's fiat?

According to Wikipedia, that connection was stated right at the start, in the Green Hornet radio show. After all, the Green Hornet was a retooling of The Lone Ranger for then-contemporary times.

Also both were featured on the same radio network and used the same writers.

IIRC, Britt Reid had a portrait of the Lone Ranger over his mantle.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Richard Willis said:

It occurs to me that these family connections driven by surnames may have been inspired by the Green Hornet radio show revealing that Britt Reid was related to John Reid, the Lone Ranger.

I wonder if this connection was planned when the Green Hornet was created or was it yet another writer's fiat?

According to Wikipedia, that connection was stated right at the start, in the Green Hornet radio show. After all, the Green Hornet was a retooling of The Lone Ranger for then-contemporary times.

I think the main reason that the creators of the Green Hornet went with the nephew connection (actually grandnephew) was that it could give the characters a blood connection, but one with enough flexibility to give them some wiggle room.  As a result, the Lone Ranger can stay in fixed point in the past, and every time the Green Hornet gets updated, another "great" gets added between them.  Otherwise, it could be like poor Peggy Carter, who started out as Sharon Carter's sister, and wound up her great-aunt.  When this whole Guardian & Speedy thing started back in the 1970s, it was at least possible that Jim Harper could have been a rookie cop circa WW2, his brother Will could have enlisted in the Civilian Conservation Corps and then stayed west as a forest ranger, and Will's son Roy could be a Teen-ish Titan.  The Earth-1 Jim Harper would have just floated through time with Roy, just as the Earth-1 Zatara always floated a fixed number of years before Zatanna, especially since I don't recall Kirby ever referenced either the Guardian or the Newsboy Legion as having been active in WW2 in Jimmy Olsen.  The Earth-2 refugee Jim Harper, on the other hand, just keeps getting older (well, except for the fact that he's dead), so he was probably still shot circa 1970, which would have been long before the present day Roy Harper was born.  I've really got to stop thinking about comic book characters relative ages, I know it's not good for me.

Post-Crisis, the Newsboys Legion that interacts with Superman was established to be clones of the originals and the Jim Harper Clone did exist but initially did not know that he was not the original (Superman Annual #2, 1988).

I don't think that Jack Kirby - or anyone else - ever determined on panel whether the team that co-starred with Jimmy in his own book back in 1970 and 1971 were clones of the originals, but the hinting was very heavy indeed, what with regular sized Gabby clones and miniature Scrapper clones floating around, the four "parents" of the then-current Newsboys Legion being identical to their "sons", and not even a token gesture towards asking whether the clones were made from the1940s versions or rather the 1970s, or even any acknowledgement that it should have made any difference.

One of the 70s Newsboy Legion looking exactly like his father would have been natural, all FOUR of them being identical especially when the story is about cloning, makes me wonder if Jack had planned for them to be clones from the beginning. Considering also that no mention was made about their mothers!

The WONDER WOMAN story from Adventure Comics #461 (F'79) by Jack C. Harris and Jack Abel opens with the Amazon Princess stopping a warehouse robbery in San Francisco by three super-strong women whose power and resilience appear to be on par with Amazons. After they escape when one gets struck on the head, Wonder Woman continues onward to her reunion with her adopted sister, Donna (WONDER GIRL) Troy

She changes back to Diana Prince as she arrives at "Dr. Tammines' School For Exceptional Girls" where she is met by Donna with whom she has been out of contact with! They meet Dr. Tammines who invites Diana to stay overnight. On their way to Donna's room, Diana sees three young women pass and one has a bandage on her head in the same spot where one of the thieves was struck! When Donna immediately goes straight to bed and falls asleep, Diana is shocked to see her bed turn into a strange device! 

"Dr. Tammines" reveals himself to the Justice League's lamest foe, HEADMASTER-MIND who had stalked Wonder Girl and created the school to siphon her powers into his "AMAZOIDS" and plans to add Wonder Woman's powers to the mix! She frees Wonder Girl and convinces the Amazoids that their powers are gone and they quickly defeat them as Headmaster-Mind tumbles into some machinery and is apparently killed. 

The women are freed from his control and urged to believe in their true potential. Wonder Girl decides to continue her super-hero career and will search for her true identity!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • This was the payoff of Wonder Girl heading for the West Coast as was mentioned in the last issue of Teen Titans.
  • This was the only time that Wonder Woman and Wonder Girl teamed up in the Bronze Age. And it was in Adventure Comics, not Wonder Woman.
  • Indeed, at every new direction that Wonder Woman took in the late 60s, 70s and early 80s, Wonder Girl is nowhere to be found!
  • I challenge anyone to find five stories (not including this one) in the Bronze Age where Wonder Woman and Wonder Girl spoke to each other before New Teen Titans #4 (F'81).
  • Wonder Woman states that Wonder Girl had never attended any "American school" before now, so her actual college career must have been brief.
  • In a flashback, Speedy was drawn in his 70s outfit but sleeves were added to match his original one but his upper arms are still visible.
  • Apparently WW and WG hadn't spoken in a long time as WG wanted to "find herself".
  • Headmaster-Mind's plan involved following WG around for years, learning her secret identity and her goals and wishes and established a school for girls to trap and control her! Good thing he died!
  • Jack Abel is one of my least favorite inkers with his thin lines and his pencils are no better.
  • This actually begins the storyline where Donna searches for the answers of her past that culminate in New Teen Titans #38 for a brief time, anyways!
  • Donna's personal timeline leading to New Teen Titans get murky here as she would go to an East Coast college, meet and fall in love with Terry Long and start a photography business in a very short amount of time!
  • Donna would also star in her own solo backup feature in Wonder Woman #265-266 (Ma-Ap'80), six months before New Teen Titans, where she would save Mister Jupiter from a criminal called Perfection. This was written by E. Nelson Bridwell.

Next: Working for the Man OR Undercover of the Night!

Philip Portelli said:

Also both were featured on the same radio network and used the same writers.

IIRC, Britt Reid had a portrait of the Lone Ranger over his mantle.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Richard Willis said:

It occurs to me that these family connections driven by surnames may have been inspired by the Green Hornet radio show revealing that Britt Reid was related to John Reid, the Lone Ranger.

I wonder if this connection was planned when the Green Hornet was created or was it yet another writer's fiat?

According to Wikipedia, that connection was stated right at the start, in the Green Hornet radio show. After all, the Green Hornet was a retooling of The Lone Ranger for then-contemporary times.

Fame, alas, is fleeting:  https://captaincomics.ning.com/profiles/blogs/deck-log-entry-119-fr...

16 episodes on 8 CDs available from RadioSpirits.com.

"This collector's set of Dan Reid adventures includes the origin story of The Lone Ranger, the classic 1942 story arc introducing Dan as the Ranger's nephew, some of Dan's more memorable western adventures, and the earliest installments in The Green Hornet story arc that memorializes the family ties. For fans of both The Lone Ranger and The Green Hornet, these critical chapters of their shared history make for exciting listening."

Episodes Include: The Lone Ranger: Pico Gonzales (The Last Bullet) 02-05-47, Heading North 12-14-42; Design For Murder 12-16-42, Rope's End 12-18-42; Law Of The Apex 12-21-42, Dan's Strange Behavior 12-23-42; A Nephew Is Found 12-25-42, Dan Finds Crime 09-06-43; Mal Nugent (Rustler's Return) 09-08-43, Bolivar & Hacksaw 03-08-44; Tricky 08-23-44, Frank, Luke Brady (North Star) 05-20-46; Mort Pierce (Cigars and Ashes) 08-06-54, The Green Hornet: Exposed 10-28-47; Graft Crosses A Bridge 11-04-47, Too Hot To Handle 11-11-47

As lame as Headmaster-Mind was as a JLA villain (and this Wonder Women story may be his career high point), I always thought he could have been interesting as a recurring Teen Titans villain, if only with the concept of his School for Super-Villains providing a steady supply of junior grade foes for the Titans to fight.  The Titans cartoon basically went that way with Brother Blood & the HIVE Academy, so it could have worked with the lamoid who actually started out with that gimmick.

One thing that's always puzzled me about the "mystery" of Donna Troy's background is that, until Perez got rid of most of their science-fictiony trappings after the Crisis, The Amazons had always had some sort of "time scope" technology.   Hippolyta's "Magic Sphere" was present in All-Star #8, and that's as far back as DC's Amazons go.  So, how did the Amazons not know how Donna wound up in that apartment, and who those people were with her?  Donna must have asked some questions when she was growing up, certainly she would have after they told her how she got to Paradise Island, so why didn't they use one of those devices to find some answers?  I get that the "real world" reason was that by the time "Donna Troy" was given her own origin, both the Golden Age Magic Sphere and the Silver Age Time Viewers that figured in several early Wonder Girl "solo" stories (much like teen Clark Kent, teen Diana seemed to spend way too much time watching future adventures of her adult self--one wonders why the Legion was so worried about Superboy learning details about his future by hanging out in the 30th century when he was already learning plenty about his future just sitting in the Kents' basement!) had been downplayed and mostly forgotten.  But, by the 80s, when Donna finally got serious about solving this mystery, I believe the Magic Sphere was back, and could easily have provided not only the answers that Dick Grayson did, but could have identified her long-lost father as well.  I mean, do you really want to trust something that important to a detective who basically went "Holy Genealogy!  There's only one student registered at Hudson U who has the same last name as one of Batman's foes--Duela Dent must be the Joker's Daughter!"?

Assuming that the Time Viewer is the device that Hypollita used in Super Friends #2 and #3 back in 1976, IIRC it worked in those E. Nelson Bridwell stories by presenting "the most likely future".

Seeing how it is supposedly a gift from the gods powered by their will, I think that it can be reasonably assumed that it works exactly as much and in the exact fashion that Afrodite and her brothers and sisters want it to.  A quick way of asking for divine portents and perhaps no more than that.

The implication (unwritten as it is) would be that for their own reasons the Gods of Olympus did not want to reveal Donna's origins, or at least Hypollita and Diana did not feel entitled to ask.

That is the regular thorn of time travel and time scrying.  Make them too easily accessible, too safe, too reliable, and it becomes hard to explain how the protagonists are ever surprised by anything.

Hmm, maybe that is the true secret origin of the Bat-God who "defeats anyone" by being "sufficiently prepared"? :)

Dave Elyea said:

One thing that's always puzzled me about the "mystery" of Donna Troy's background is that, until Perez got rid of most of their science-fictiony trappings after the Crisis, The Amazons had always had some sort of "time scope" technology.   Hippolyta's "Magic Sphere" was present in All-Star #8, and that's as far back as DC's Amazons go.  So, how did the Amazons not know how Donna wound up in that apartment, and who those people were with her?  Donna must have asked some questions when she was growing up, certainly she would have after they told her how she got to Paradise Island, so why didn't they use one of those devices to find some answers?  I get that the "real world" reason was that by the time "Donna Troy" was given her own origin, both the Golden Age Magic Sphere and the Silver Age Time Viewers that figured in several early Wonder Girl "solo" stories (much like teen Clark Kent, teen Diana seemed to spend way too much time watching future adventures of her adult self--one wonders why the Legion was so worried about Superboy learning details about his future by hanging out in the 30th century when he was already learning plenty about his future just sitting in the Kents' basement!) had been downplayed and mostly forgotten.  But, by the 80s, when Donna finally got serious about solving this mystery, I believe the Magic Sphere was back, and could easily have provided not only the answers that Dick Grayson did, but could have identified her long-lost father as well.  I mean, do you really want to trust something that important to a detective who basically went "Holy Genealogy!  There's only one student registered at Hudson U who has the same last name as one of Batman's foes--Duela Dent must be the Joker's Daughter!"?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service