All-Star Comics #3 (Winter 1940):

1)I expect that if you've only read one Golden Age adventure of the JSA, this is the one.  It's not bad, but this first issue is more like an anthology than a team book, per se.

 

2)Line-Up: The Atom (Al Pratt), Doctor Fate (Kent Nelson), the Flash (Jay Garrick), the Green Lantern (Alan Scott), the Hawkman (Carter Hall), the  Hour Man (Rex Tyler), the Sandman (Wesley Dodds) and the Spectre (Jim Corrigan), with gate-crasher Johnny Thunder and the Red Tornado (Ma Hunkle), to whom Hourman says "Why, we meant to inviite you but we heard you were busy!" All white guys, of cours,e but only to be expected in those less progressive days. Nowadays, things are much different, since when the Justice League was recently revamped, the founding members were just mostly white guys. That aside, I have no real beef with the membership except the inclusion of Johnny Thunder, a character I've always loathed. If they had to have a "comedy" character on the team, I would've much preferred the Red Tornado.

 

3)The JSA gathers for a dinner. Johnny Thunder crashes the party and offers the suggestion that they each narrate an adventure to pass the time. During the dinner, the Flash is summoned to Washington, DC, to meet with Madam Fatal the head of the FBI.

 

4)No origin is given for the team - they all just sort of seem to know each other, already. Johnny Thunder is aware of the meeting, but the Sandman later says that the meeting is a secret. Although knocking out everyone in the lobby actually seems like it be more likely to draw attention than discourage it.

 

5)Doctor Fate: ""The Spectre and I do not touch food." Just as well, Doc, I wouldn't want to see you try to eat with that helmet on.

 

6)Superman, Batman and Robin and the Tornado are described as being "busy".  I find I don't miss Supes and Bats from the team.

 

7)The art is generally OK - nothing exceptionally good or exceptionally bad.

 

8)The Flash tells how he battled some pirates. A light-hearted story, particularly his encounter with a shark. Comics are far too serious these days to have a scene like that in it.

 

9)Hawkman tells of his battle with some fire people. Moldoff draws his wings REALLY HUGE.

 

10)The Spectre tells of his battle with Oom the Mighty, the goofiest demon ever.

 

11)Hourman tells of his battle with jewel thieves who all dress as Hourman.  Amusing because in the end, everyone thinks Rex Tyler was posing as Hourman when he actually was Hourman!

 

12)We have a brief interval where the Red Tornado drops by long enough for it to be revealed that she tore her pants. The Flash is aware of her as a comics character.

 

13)The Sandman tells of his battle of a mad doctor who creates giants in a particularly creepy tale.  I notice alot of these guys, their girlfirends know their secret ID's, with out it being the end of the world.

 

14)Doctor Fate introduces himself thusly:  " I am not human...I never was a child...I had no youth. The elder gods created me just as I am now, and placed me here on Earth to fight evil sorcery!"  I'm pretty sure this is the only place I remember the character's provenance being set out in this manner. anyhow, Fate tells of his battle with an evil sorceror.  Probably the most distinctive art style on this one.

 

15)Johnny Thunder, having suggested story-telling, says he's too shy to do it, "So the editors have written a story about something that happened to me."  So, he knows he's a comic book character, too. Anyhow, his adventure is a text pice about some silly damn thing he did.

 

16)The Atom battles a gang of gold thieves.  Whenever I see the Golden Age Atom's original costume I wonder why the crooks don't all just laugh themselves to death.

 

17)Green Lantern tells of his battle with some racketeers.

 

18)Cliffhanger: The Flash returns with the message that the head of the FBI wants to meet with them all!

 

Overall: This first issue holds up pretty well, all things considered. I still find it a fun read.

 

Views: 31114

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion



Jimmm Kelly said:

Not to jack the thread too much more I hope. But it strikes me that this thread is lacking some Doctor Who reference--so I think the Mxy mix-up is like the TARDIS mix-up. I believe Susan says it's--Time And Relative Dimension In Space. But in a later episode someone gets it wrong and says Time And Relative Dimensions In Space. 

 

 

I think it's just as possible that Carole Ann Ford mis-read the line in the first place, and her mistake inadvertently became "canon".

JSA Secret Files and Origins #1 (August 1999)

This book is sort of a "preparatory" for the upcoming JSA on-going.

 

1)We open with "Gathering Storms", in which Wesley Dodds and Speed Saunders meet the Gray Man (He turned up in alot of DC books back then, but I forget what his deal was.), and talk about a possible reincarnation of Fate. Afterwards, Dodds falls off a cliff after confronting the mysterious Dark Lord.  Sentinel, the Flash, Wildcat and Hippolyta hear the news, and deliver it to the others:

  • Sentinel informs Ted Knight, the Star-Spangled Kid (Courtney Whitmore) and Starman (Jack Knight). Ted definitely states that "I created this technology after all."
  • The Flash informs the android Hourman, who already knew because he has time-vision or something.
  • Wildcat informs Al Rothstein, who is assuming the identity of Atom Smasher.
  • Hippolyta informs the Black Canary (DInah Laurel Lance), who, amusingly, is thinking about errands she needs to run while fighting crooks.
  • We also see Krndra Saunders becoming Hawkgirl and Sandy Hawkins crying in bed.

 

2)We get profile pages for the following:

  • Atom Smasher
  • The Black Canary
  • The Dark Lord (I'm ashamed to admit that there's a blatant clue to his true identity given here that I totally missed: "First Appearance (historical) Adventure Comics #369 (June, 1968)".  I'm not a good fanboy at all.
  • Doctor Mid-Nite (Pieter Cross)
  • Extant
  • Fate's Legacy
  • The Flash
  • Hawkgirl
  • Hourman
  • Mister Terrific (Michael Holt)
  • Obsidian (Todd Rice)
  • Sand (I liked the idea of what they initially did with Sandy, making him a more up-to-date version of the Golden Age Sandman. Personally, I thought it was a mistake making him an "Earth elemental" later on, I thought it was an unnecessary complication of the character.
  • Sentinel
  • The Spectre
  • Starman VII (Let's see...Ted Knight, the 50's one, Prince Gavyn, Mikaal Tomas, David Knight...how is Jack the seventh? Are they counting Thom Kallor?)
  • The Star-Spangled Kid
  • Wildcat
  • Wonder Woman (Hippolyta)

 

3)"Dead Ends": The Black Canary tries to convince Jared Stevens to attend Wesley Dodds' funeral. He refuses. They beat up a demon in a bar. Jared predicts a new JSA, but that he will not be part of it.  I'm guessing this may be because the Dark Lord has found him.

 

4)We next get a JSA timeline, very thorough.

 

5)"History 101" shows Sentinel giving the Star-Spangled Kid a tour through the JSA's memorabilia, lots of callbacks to old adventures here.

 

6)We end with a guide to the new JSA HQ. I like stuff like that.

 

Overall:  An interesting look at what they plan to do and the stories they are setting up.

 



Lee Semmens said:

It's strange that at Wikipedia "original research" is a strict no-no, and yet I see so many mistakes there that could be corrected by someone actually doing the maligned original research himself, instead of purely relying on secondary, tertiary, or even quaternary sources.

In the case of comics' articles, original research is often absolutely essential, as frequently the information is not "out there" in published form, or even on online. And if it is, it's often incorrect. It's not as though comics and their history is a fertile academic field, with peer-reviewed studies.

I've seen other Wikipedia articles about comics characters that referenced the original comic books. I don't see how doing that could be considered "original research" in the Wikipedia sense.



Commando Cody said:



Lee Semmens said:

It's strange that at Wikipedia "original research" is a strict no-no, and yet I see so many mistakes there that could be corrected by someone actually doing the maligned original research himself, instead of purely relying on secondary, tertiary, or even quaternary sources.

In the case of comics' articles, original research is often absolutely essential, as frequently the information is not "out there" in published form, or even on online. And if it is, it's often incorrect. It's not as though comics and their history is a fertile academic field, with peer-reviewed studies.

I've seen other Wikipedia articles about comics characters that referenced the original comic books. I don't see how doing that could be considered "original research" in the Wikipedia sense.

Just to be clear, the Wikipedia guidelines on original research are as follows:

The phrase "original research" (OR) is used on Wikipedia to refer to material—such as facts, allegations, and ideas—for which no reliable, published sources exist.[1] This includes any analysis or synthesis of published material that serves to advance a position not advanced by the sources. To demonstrate that you are not adding OR, you must be able to cite reliable, published sources that are directly related to the topic of the article, and directly support the material being presented.

Citing a primary source (which is what the original comics are) is in no way doing original research. Now, if you went out and interviewed a bunch of comics writers and relied on their memories to write your Wikipedia article, that would be considered original research and would be verboten (if you published your interviews, I guess someone else could legitimately cite your interviews).

The problem is the large number of interviews done over the years where certain parties have been in the regular habit of outright LYING-- especially, for company-Copyright reasons.

The Baron said:



Figserello said:


The Baron said:


Figserello said:

Too bad. I thought a lot of what I wrote related directly to what Morrison was doing with those 5 issues of JLA the Baron introduced to his thread, and how the writer was setting up how the characters this thread is devoted to would be used in their own ongoing series.

 

Four, actually.

 

But as you say...

 

 

 

That' a great picture.


You're such a pedant.
 
I'm an annoying nut. It's no wonder I live alone in a room.

 

 

Also funny.  :-)

 

OK.  I didn't participate in the Golden Age section of this thread because I don't have any of comics or reprints from that era.  (Maybe just the first issue where they all meet up to sit around and compare notes?)

 

Then I just couldn't bring myself to read the Silver Age JLA/JSA team-ups because myself and Philip had read them up and down and inside-out over the last year or so.  I just couldn't bring myself to jump in again. Also, it slowly dawned on me while we were reading through them and I took it upon myself to read as many of the surrounding issues of JLA as I could that DC weren't producing the best comics that they might have during this era, certainly not the best comics starring their main characters together.  I can see why the JLA/JSA team-ups are remembered fondly, and some of them were fun, but the comics generally have the impression of something rushed out on the cheap!  Considering that it turned out that DC were sitting on some of the world's most valuable IP, so much of the comics produced were just sub-par.

 

The only really positive thing I'd say about that era, is that we don't have to imagine what comics produced by a carpark company would look like, because there they are!

 

But your standard high speed rate of plowing through the stuff has brought us now to the mid-90s and suddenly I'm very happy!  I do think this was a very good era for DC comics.  Of course its great that your reading list has crossed paths with my Morrison JLA one, but both the JSA mini-series set at the end of WW2, and the JSA series you are now embarking on were very high quality as far as I'm concerned.

 

I don't have access to those JSA WW2 comics, so I didn't pay too much attention to the discussion on those either, but I'll have to go back and read your discussion and maybe contribute.  In any case, I recall it used real world history well, and was a good standalone series where the continuity was just the sugar on top rather than the whole bun.  It was a clever thing to do, to use the hackneyed old 'team splits up and deals with seperate foes and then all meets at the end' format, but expanded into an issue for each subteam.   That better accomodated the less frenetic pacing of good 'Reconstructionist era' comics, and allow plenty of character moments, which were in extremely short supply for decades of these characters' existences.

 

More later...

JSA #1 (August 1999): "Justice Be Done"

1)Atom Smasher, the Black Canary, the Flash, Hourman, Sand, Sentinel. Starman, the Star-Spangled Kid, Wildcat, Wonder Woman (Hippolyta).  Johnny Thunder and Ted Knight  are also present, but do not take part in any fighting.

 

2)Someone has been killing off agents of Chaos and Order (Not KAOS and CONTROL?), and Kid Eternity has reached the top of their list!  (I was not aware that KE was an "Agent of Chaos".)  Amongst the dead heroes he's called up to defend himself, it appears he's called up Green Lantern Hal Jordan and Jericho!  I wonder how these dead types feel about being "called up" like that.

 

3)Sand encounters Sandman from the Endless in a dream.  I'm not too familiar with this character, but apparently he was created by occasional Doctor Who writer Neil Gaiman, who seems to have worked in comics at one point in his career.

 

4)In Subplot Land, Todd "Obsidian" Rice is in a diner with someone called "Ian" that no one else can see.  I forget how that payed off.

 

5)The scene shifts to Sandman's funeral, which is at a sort of super-hero's burial ground, which I think is an interesitng idea.  Say, when they come back to life, do they get a refund on their burial plots?

 

6)Wildcat name-checks Madam Fatal, a Golden Age character ripe for re-invention in the Nu52.

 

7)"Jenny-Lynn. The aftermath of her time as Green Lantern kept her fr0m attending."  I forget what that's all about.

 

8)Jared Stevens shows up, having been murdered. Way to upstage Wesley at his own funeral, Jared!  Don't be that guy.

 

9)They are all attacked by a gang of Egyptian deadites called the Sons of Anubis, which sounds like a fraternal order of some sort.

 

10)Cliffhanger:  Scarab the Unappealing Man shows up and is all portentous and stuff!

 

Overall: A good beginning, here. I'm not Robinson's biggest booster, but he got off to a good start, here.

JSA #2 (September 1999): "The Wheel of Life"

1)Atom Smasher, the Black Canary, the Flash, Hawkgirl, Hourman, Sand, Sentinel, Starman, the Star-Spangled Kid, Wildcat, Wonder Woman.

 

2)Scarab informs our heroes that there are three babies that are potentially the re-incarnation of Doctor Fate. They split up into groups to track the babies down, whilst Courtney follows Scarab when he takes off with the Ghost of Harry Caray Kent Nelson.

 

3)Sand, Sentinel and Wonder Woman go to Tibet where they are set upon by Egypto-Zombies.  Sand speaks Chinese and some Tibetan.

 

4)The Black Canary, the Flash and Starman go to Venice. They also encounter Egypto-Zombies. No word on what languages any of them speak.

 

5)In Vancouver, Atom Smasher, Hourman and Wilcat meet Hawkgirl, and have the obligatory misunderstanding, and discover that this is the baby they are after.

 

6)Cliffhanger: The Dark Lord shows up, and reveals himself to be....Mordru!

 

Overall:  I really liked the idea of using Mordru here - it's one of those things you wouldn't expect, but makes perfect sense in terms of the character.

1) I'm going to regret saying this again but the Dream of the Endless shown was actually Daniel, son of Hector and Lyta Hall AKA the Silver Scarab and Fury and thus the grandchild of both the Golden Age Hawkman AND the Golden Age Wonder Woman. And yes, I know exactly how confusing that sounds!

2) I know who "Ian" is but I shall remain silent for now.

3) Madam Fatal was....unique to say the least. Ah, the innocence of the Golden age...

4) Jenny-Lynn, IIRC, lost her powers as Jade, was briefly Green Lantern and soon gained plant powers ala her mother, the Golden Age Rose & the Thorn.

5) The deaths of both Kid Eternity II and The Man Called Fate didn't bother me in the least.

6) I had no idea who Scarab was then. Still don't today!

7) Apparently someone wanted to recycle the Silver Age Hawkgirl's mask. Good idea.

8) Using Mordru as the Dark Lord was interesting but we know that he can't win and can't perish either.



Philip Portelli said:

8) Using Mordru as the Dark Lord was interesting but we know that he can't win and can't perish either.

 

 

Granted. But for me, stories like this are less about "Will the heroes win?" and more about "How will the heroes win?"



Figserello said:

 I can see why the JLA/JSA team-ups are remembered fondly, and some of them were fun,

 

 

Re-reading them myself, I came to the conclusion that I was much less of a critical reader when I was 13 than I am at 50.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service