What with everyone reading the old comics and myself listening to the Thin Man while I drive I realized that we are seeing and hearing a lot of stuff that no one ever hears anymore. In the Thin Man people go to 'Speaks' and if someone is drunk they are called 'tight'. As the Captain reads the Avengers I wonder how long it will be before he reads Rick saying 'Dig it'?

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1. I recall many race-based expressions. I don't mean outright racist words for one group or another, but colloquial expressions, figures of speech, that were based on racist assumptions. Those are refreshingly less common in the present.And yes, I'm aware some perfectly acceptable words/expressions have been attacked due to absolutely false racist/sexist "histories." Picnic and rule of thumb come to mind. Neither have an actual sordid, offensive history, so I'm not talking about that sort of thing. I'm talking about ones that floor me now when I remember people actually said these things.

Does anyone say, "floor me"?

2. It's a nitpick, but I remember watching the Legends of Tomorrow episode where they were in the 1950s and someone used the word "sucks" to general understanding. Despite the unreality of the show, that, of all things, ripped me out of the episode's historical context.  

Captain Comics said:

 "Sucks" for bad had a hard time catching on in my town because parents were very alarmed at the sexual connotation. But as my generation moved into adulthood, "sucks" became commonplace and has stuck with us ever since.

I'm proud fit to bust!

From confused comments on youtube no one knows "sore" can mean angry. Buddy Hackett singing your Shipoopi won't get sore if you kiss her has people assuming something dirty is going on. The Dragonball Z theme song Chala Head Chala roughly translates at one point as "Kicked in the face, the Earth is mad as a fire brigade. Can't you feel it building up for her to blow?" Apparently no one thinks of anger as something that builds up inside of a person until they lose control, and again it's assumed to be something dirty.

Also anybody remember when an outfit was a group of people, not just a suit of clothing? Suggest that now and watch the confused looks.

Lately they've been playing a clip of Vice President Biden saying "that's a lot of malarkey!" Don't recall if it's recent, but whenever, it sounds pretty quaint.

(Once long ago, President Reagan said he'd had it "up to my keester" with something, and Mark Russell thought it was hilarious.)

The clip comes from his speech at the Democratic convention. The cable heads seem to get a kick out of it, but he's used the term plenty of times before -- I seem to remember him using it a couple of times in his debate with Paul Ryan back in 2012.

Here's a word I'd like to check with you guys. Back in 2008, I heard Obama use the word "notion" in a sentence. And I remember thinking "haven't heard that word in a while." At least in its use as "idea" or "concept," instead of "knick-knack" or "gift." He used it a couple of times. And then BOOM suddenly all the talking heads were using it, and they still are. Did anybody else have that experience, or had "notion" been in use and I had just missed it?

The same happened with "gravitas" when Bush had chosen Cheney as a running mate. Whenever I hear "notion" I think of my grandmother's sewing kit.  

Captain Comics said:

The clip comes from his speech at the Democratic convention. The cable heads seem to get a kick out of it, but he's used the term plenty of times before -- I seem to remember him using it a couple of times in his debate with Paul Ryan back in 2012.

Here's a word I'd like to check with you guys. Back in 2008, I heard Obama use the word "notion" in a sentence. And I remember thinking "haven't heard that word in a while." At least in its use as "idea" or "concept," instead of "knick-knack" or "gift." He used it a couple of times. And then BOOM suddenly all the talking heads were using it, and they still are. Did anybody else have that experience, or had "notion" been in use and I had just missed it?

For good spell, "Bogus" was used incessantly to express disapproval, or more generally, not good. I remember explaining the true meaning of the word, false or fake, to a coworker once. He didn't believe me, insisting the word was a product of his time.   

I think the fact that the talking heads pick up the language of the politicians as soon as a pol uses something unusual is just more indication, if any is needed, that our TV "watchdogs" are lapdogs. They think of themselves as part of the power structure, not opposed to it. And not just part, but a junior part. They not only want "access" -- the usual defense about softballing politicians -- they want to be invited to the right parties.

Perhaps the worst of these -- and I admit it's a crowded field -- was David Gregory when he was doing Meet the Press. He so desperately craved the approval of his guests that he never challenged them, and bordered on oleaginous at times. It shocked him when he was fired, because he thought he was a star and a player, and stars don't get fired.

He should have been thinking of himself as a journalist. He might have seen his job description more clearly.

Sorry to toddle off on a rant, folks. Nothing more to see here. Move along, Johnny.

In context, I think "oleaginous" is the most cromulent word you could have used.



Captain Comics said:

I think the fact that the talking heads pick up the language of the politicians as soon as a pol uses something unusual is just more indication, if any is needed, that our TV "watchdogs"

All it takes is one 'cool' person to utter a phrase in the right way at the right time and it becomes general usage.  I can think of no better example of this than the Fonz with the word 'cool'.

The word "cool" was in widespread popular usage long before Happy Days. It's history is quite long, but it jumped from jazz musicians to the mainstream by the actual 1950s. 

Its use in African-American culture goes back further, to the 1930s at least. Its current use retains elements of its even older use to mean "rational and calm in the face of adversary" which is, of course, far older,



Mark S. Ogilvie said:

All it takes is one 'cool' person to utter a phrase in the right way at the right time and it becomes general usage.  I can think of no better example of this than the Fonz with the word 'cool'.

These are two good points. Incidentally, it was Calvin Coolidge that first used the now accepted word "normalcy". Prior to his incorrect usage, the proper word was "normality".

JD DeLuzio said:

The word "cool" was in widespread popular usage long before Happy Days. It's history is quite long, but it jumped from jazz musicians to the mainstream by the actual 1950s. 

Its use in African-American culture goes back further, to the 1930s at least. Its current use retains elements of its even older use to mean "rational and calm in the face of adversary" which is, of course, far older,



Mark S. Ogilvie said:

All it takes is one 'cool' person to utter a phrase in the right way at the right time and it becomes general usage.  I can think of no better example of this than the Fonz with the word 'cool'.

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