Thought maybe I'd just make this an undated, running thread -- and just date the entries as the weeks turn.


3/28/2012


Of the books I've read so far, Flash 7 is my favorite -- I loved Flash running through the wormhole, the promise he made to Snart (and the resolution of that promise), an interesting wrinkle in what will likely wind up being the Golden Glider's origin, the hint at Captain Singh's love life, and more. I liked Iris going through the wormhole -- it'll give Barry some alone time with her (though I'm by no means anti-Patty). And I'm looking forward to Turbine, next issue!

All-Star Western never disappoints, either -- the lead story made good use of Hex's origins and I like the gladatorial scenario. And the backup art had a real John Severin feel to it, which I appreciated -- and I liked the look at Nighthawk's background, as well. My one quibble was that I couldn't tell if Cinnamon was wearing a mask or not -- in some places, it looked like she wasn't drawn wearing one, but the colorist might have been trying to fix that.

Aquaman, sadly, I'm thinking of dropping. It's good -- objectively a good comic, I think, well drawn and exciting in parts -- but it isn't really connecting with me. Maybe it will in trades, sometime down the road.

New Deadwardians: I was planning on waiting for the trade with this one, but I decided to give a single issue a chance. I love the mystery it sets up, and I love the low-key nature of the supernatural here. It's well worth checking out.

Legion of Super Heroes: Secret Origin wrapped up with a nice moment for Phantom Girl, in particular. That said, I'm not sorry to see it go. While it approached the formation of the Legion in a different way than I'd ever seen before, and Chris Batista delivered some nice Ernie Colon-inspired work, the book as a whole was kind of flat. I much prefer the modern-day Legion, with characters who have a long history behind them. 

Still to come: Daredevil and The Unwritten.

Views: 5999

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Yup, not too long ago.  It was better then, and shorter too.

Captain Comics said:


Besides, didn't Thor do this once before? Demigorge or somebody? I seem to recall Thor fighting a god-killer somewheres at least once before.

Let me do a little catch-up:

5/29/13

Smallville Season Eleven Special #1: This book kept kicking my nostalgia motor into gear every other page, and not because it's riffing off a TV show I used to watch. The story teams Martian Manhunter, Batman and Nightwing against a white Martian, and this becomes the origin of Miss Martian. If you know Miss Martian's pre-New 52 origin or watched her on the animated Young Justice, then you see this coming a mile away, so I hope I'm not spoiling anything. And that's just one pre-New 52 element here. Another is that J'onn J'onzz dresses as he did in the Justice League International days, and except for the Smallville-specific elements (like J'onn having met Jor-El), he acts pretty much like that, too. Toss in Batman, and this is very much like a '90s Justice League title. Which I don't mind at all.

One different element is Batman. For one thing, he's not a jerk! He encourages MM's optimism, he is leery of losing touch with his humanity, and in most cases is a very human character. His creepy voice is demonstrably fake -- Nightwing mimics him occasionally to annoy him -- and his outfit seems to be still in process. The most obvious element of the latter part is a sort of chain-mail-looking thingie from the bottom of his cowl (which stops at the cheek bones) and runs under the chin. It's a cool look, and the sort of change I was hoping for in the Earth 2 Batman and didn't get.

And Nightwing isn't Dick Grayson -- he's not even a he. It's Barbara Gordon, and that's a nice twist, but the Bruce- Babs relationship mirrored the Bruce-Dick relationship so tightly that it really didn't make much of a difference. 

All in all, I rather enjoyed this Special, even though -- or maybe because -- none of the usual Smallville cast appeared, including the lead character. 

Masters of the Universe: The orgin of Hordak #1: Another surprisingly enjoyable book. Well, if you don't mind Keith Giffen riffing shamelessly from Jack Kirby all the time, which I don't. (I prefer Giffen's Kirby swipes over his other kinds of swipes.) The real star here is the story, though, which doesn't involve any of the MotU characters at all. It takes place in an unspecified past where Hordak emerges as a pretty frightening result of a scene similar to the first few pages of New Gods #1 ("There came a time when the old Gods died ..."). Again, despite all the swipe-age, it's a pretty good origin and a pretty scary villain. Who knew I'd ever like anything with "Masters of the Universe" in the title? Giffen is taking chances by darkening this kiddie cartoon, and really, that's the only way I'd tolerate it, so yay.

Red Hood and the Outlaws Annual #1: It's fascinating to me that most of what I really don't like about this book is being very specifically and deliberately addressed.

For example, I saw no reason whatsoever to follow the adventures of Jason Todd, a really unlikable character even when he was a good guy -- and with the advent of this book, he was most decidedly not even that. A murderer, a thug, a jerk -- what's to like? But the last few issues have wiped his past clean, so now everyone can forgive him -- even Batman, apparently -- because he doesn't remember doing all those awful things. (It's the Tony Stark/Civil War Syndrome!) And this annual addresses the other two characters, trying to put a more heroic spin on Roy Harper, for example (and explaining his connection to, and antipathy for, Green Arrow), and addressing Koriand'r's current sex kitten role by having another character outright state that it's an act for a reason we've yet to learn. 

And hey, that's great that they're trying to make this trio more likable. I'm guessing that's because I wasn't the only one who found this book repulsive! But you know, it's too little, too late. I'm just never going to like thuggish Jason Todd and whiny Roy Harper, and I cannot wipe from my mind the misogynistic crap done to Koriand'r, formerly one of the toughest, most confident and most centered females in comics. 

The Wake #1: It's too early to really say what's going on here, but it's Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy bringing the chill (as they do in American Vampire miniseries), so I'm on board.

Superman Adventures #1: This book arises from a digital-first series, which I presume is available on DCcomics.com. Anyway, it features old-fashioned, red-trunks Superman in adventures that could easily have taken place in the '70s, which is to say it's clean comics that kids can read. Which I think is a good thing -- there needs to be more comics for kids, anywhere, any time and any way it can be managed. Also, it's good to see the Superman I grew up with again, although I don't mind the new one. Call it nostalgia. As to content, this book contains three stories, and like all anthologies, it's hit or miss. The real miss for me was the one written and drawn by Jeff Lemire; the story was pretty good but the art was just freaking hideous. Please, please, please DC, stop letting Lemire draw stuff. Honestly, *I* am a better artist than he is, pinky swear.

6/5/13

Astro City #1: This is like visiting your childhood neighborhood and somehow everything is not only as wonderful as you remember, but even better. Somehow Busiek and Anderson make Astro City feel both as fresh and vital as a new job, while as warm and comfortable as old slippers. It has, as usual, wild flights of superhero imagination, tempered by small moments of simple human emotion/reaction. It has new, zeitgeist characters like American Chibi, and old-fashioned Superman clones like Samaritan. It's just perfect. I swear, I will read this book as long as it's published.

Swamp Thing #21: I haven't any idea who writer Charles Soulz is, but I really like his style. He developed two stories here without confusion, one a standard Swamp Thing-type conflict (battle to come next issue), while a B plot was given considerable time to develop, one that adds several cool concepts to the DC mythos ("The Sanctuary of the Green Leaf," and a new, long-lived character full of possibility called Capucine).

But what really struck me was his pitch-perfect dialogue; it was so flawless that I kept flipping back to the credits to see if someone like Scott Snyder or Geoff Johns was involved. But, no, whoever this guy is, he's got a real ear for having the characters say exactly the right things in exactly their own voices. Well done.

Phantom Stranger #9: Let me go on record that making Judas Iscariot the Phantom Stranger is, for me, the worst bloody thing they could have done. Philosophically, I don't like it when my funnybooks establish a religion any more than I do when my government tries to do it. From a sales perspective, you're telling all non-Christians to buzz off. And from a story perspective, I think it limits the character in any number of ways big and small. Given all that, I am just never going to like this Phantom Stranger. Period.

The Movement #2: I missed issue #1, so I don't really know what's going on here, but with Gail Simone, Freddie Williams II and Amanda Conner involved, it simply cannot be a bad comic book. And it isn't. No, I still don't know what's going on, but I enjoyed the ride.

Green Lantern #21: I liked most of this, primarily because the status quo has (briefly) changed. Hal Jordan is in charge of the GLC, and doesn't want to be. (Thankfully, new writer Robert Venditti acknowledges that Jordan, for whatever virtues he possesses, has neither the maturity nor the reliability to be the leader of anything.) So we get a lot of reactions to Jordan's promotion, most of which are pretty amusing. 

One thing I did *not* like was a scene where Hal and Carol broke up (AGAIN). We've seen variations of this scene a hundred times, so it feels really played out. But worse, this is, without a doubt, the most implausible break-up scene I've ever read. Venditti might as well have left the two pages blank with a big red sign saying "I'm breaking these characters up so I don't have to explain why Star Sapphire isn't hanging around every issue, making the book too hard to write." Honestly, that's exactly what was going through my head when I read that scene. He just wanted to write Carol out of the book, to make his job easier. So, boom, they break up over, literally, nothing.

Oh, well, I'm still on board. (Carol's kinda irritating, to tell the truth.) Let's see what Venditti does with his new-found freedom.

Earth 2 #13: This issue mostly stars Commander Steel, or whatever he's called in The New 52. And, you know, he was boring in the Old 52, and he's still boring now. Honestly: Steel? Atom? Mr. Terrific? It's like James Robinson is flipping through the Boring Superhero Catalog for character ideas. Who's next: Red, White & Blue? Percival Popp? Doiby Dickles? I only perked up when Hawkgirl had a scene (with a  Batman cameo), because I like the idea of a Hawkgirl who isn't a male hero's appendage and has her own, specific origin and motivations. Plus, she's got a cool costume. But is it just me, or do most Earth 2 stories feel like padding? I'm still waiting for something to happen over there!

Detective Comics #21: A nice little book, ending one girl's story while launching another girl's story. Well, that's a little too definitive for comics. Let's say it appears that one girl's story is ending, while it appears another girl's story is taking a step forward to where writer John Layman is hinting it will go.

The main plot is a nice coda to Detective Comics #0, which told the tale of a girl in Bruce Wayne's past, whereas in this issue that girl -- thought dead -- returns as an assassin and appears to die again. (And then her body disappears, so she's not dead. Hey, she's already demonstrated that she fakes dead really well!) The other girl is Harper Row, who seems headed toward being the next Robin. Batman has been forcibly and actively discouraging her from "helping" him, but in this issue she proved she's going to get into trouble no matter what he does, so he relents a bit. Hard to believe he'd tolerate any youngsters in danger after Damian, but the stories of the two women were nicely juxtaposed, especially as they crossed paths while one is on the ascension while the other is falling further from grace. 

6/12/13

Superman Unchained #1: I have no idea what happened in this issue because you can't read the story without tearing out the pull-out poster, or whatever it is, and I didn't want to do that. I assume, though, with the talent on this book that it's pretty good. :)

Green Lantern Corps #21: Weirdly, while new Green Lantern writer Robert Venditti is working hard to excise the super-powered girlfriend of the star of his book, new Green Lantern Corps writers Venditti and Van Jensen are going out of their way to cement their star's super-powered girlfriend into the narrative. This book makes it clear that, while John Stewart is the star of his book, the Star Sapphire formerly known as Fatale is going to hang around, and their relationship is going to be front and center. I don't mind that -- in fact, I rather like it -- but it's just weird how the two books are going in nearly mirror-image opposite directions. 

Anyway, it was a nice little story, and I hope for more of the same. One complaint: The final few pages introduce a few new Green Lanterns that may well prove interesting, but it's annoying that they showed up at the end of last week's Green Lantern as if we'd already met them. 

Batman #21: I'm not convinced yet we need to update Batman's origin again, but this first issue of "Zero Year" looks nice with some intriguing mysteries and character bits. The front of the book (telling Bruce Wayne's early crusade against Gotham crime while still legally dead and before the Bat-suit) is by my favorite Bat-artist (and quickly becoming favorite artist period) Greg Capullo, while the back-ups (which show vignettes of Bruce learning his skills) are by Snyder's American Vampire co-conspirator Rafael Albuquerque, so that's a smooth ride, too. A nice issue. (But still not convinced yet.)

American Vampire Special #1: The Long Road to Hell: I've bragged on American Vampire for a long time, and I'm not going to stop now. This is Snyder and Albuquerque doing what they do best, which is telling a scary tale from the past (the '50s in this case) utilizing the vast tapestry of the vampire mythology they've created, and a number of characters passing through that we know from the regular series, doing what they do and propelling the story forward breathlessly. Yet, despite all the familiar faces (some of whom we have seen meet their fate after this tale), the real star is an unexpected one, who emerges in the book's final pages as someone we will undoubtedly see again. And I'm looking forward to it.

Rob, I've been reading Black Beetle as well, simply because I am a huge Francavilla fan. A really good series, and it probably does require a re-read. Also glad to see it will come back in the fall.

Batman #21: Not much to add to what others said. Greg Capullo is doing much better work than I thought he would. I always figured him as part of the old-style Image look, but it isn't like that at all. I also really liked how bright this comic was, you hardly ever see Gotham City during the day. Perhaps the most boring cover of the year though.

X #2: X convinces Leigh to help him escape the trap the police had laid for him. He uses even that to bring pain on the police of Arcadia. He follows the chain of power up and almost finishes off another bad guy. The last page was terrific as Leigh does get the warning everyone in Arcadia fears.

Star Wars #6: Six issues in, and I've really taken a liking to Colonel Bircher. He isn't some bad ass Sith Lord or High ranking Imperial officer he is just a really good Tie pilot with incredible instincts. I hope he sticks around for a while. The plot moves along at a nice pace. Although nothing at all dedicated to Han and Chewie on Coruscant.

World's Finest #13: We get to see more of Desaad, and he creates a now monster to hunt down our pair of superheroines. Huntress uses her brains to defeat another one. One thing of note is that Power Girl thinks her powers may be waning on this Earth. I don't know if Robson Roch is the new regular artist on the series or not, but if he is that is great. Really nice clean art. My only minor complaint is that most people suffer from high forehead.

High forehead? Do they consume mass quantities? If so, they may be aliens!

I am NOT reading Black Beetle, but I will be soon. I ordered the TPB a few weeks ago when I heard the word "Francavilla." So I skip over the Black Beetle comments. But I'm with you guys in spirit!

Also, I am waiting for Geoff Johns to take over the book, and introduce the red, orange, violet, sapphire, green and yellow beetles. We already have a blue one!

Who's next: Red, White & Blue? Percival Popp? Doiby Dickles?

 

John Ostrander wrote a Spectre story starring Percival Popp.  It was really fine and moving.  It had much truth in it, and has stayed with me a long time. 

 

There're no bad characters, just bad writing!

I've only read a couple of my comics for 6/19/2013 so far...

Legion of Superheroes 21: I hate to say it, but this was a really disappointing issue. There are only two issues left in this series, and the second one is supposedly an epilogue to the whole thing. I really wanted the end of this issue to have more of a "here comes the cavalry" moment. There's a bit of that, but having just reread all of Levitz's recent run, this one felt slight, somehow... without even a confirmation whether Duplicate Girl (in horrible shape at the end of the last issue) is alive or dead. (In this issue, we see multiples of her body littering the background.) This story also relies on Tharok being able to disable "quantum relays" at will... an unexplained technology that is key to  understanding why some stuff works, and others doesn't. I'm confident Levitz will give us a decent conclusion, even if it's downbeat, but I feel like the Legion should be acquitting itself a little better here.

Wonder Woman 21: Well, I guess that's one less character to overshadow Diana in her own book. Unfortunately, we're also introduced to a planetful more. I like this book a lot, but I increasingly wonder why it's called Wonder Woman. (Or maybe that very wondering is why, in the same way that '90s legal thriller Just Cause was titled that... just 'cause.)

...A VERY QUICK SCAN OF THESE LAST TWO PAGES COULD NOT FIND WHAT YOU'RE QUOTING , FIGS . i AM VERY RUSHED NOW .

  WHAT WAS IT , PLEASE ???????

  OOPER , EVEN TOO RUSHED TO CORRECT & RE-POST THE ABOVE !!!!!!!!! (& that , that last line :--)

  I have always meant to bring that story up , it was the first time I had ever even SEEN an image of PPtSC - it was touching , indeed... (Even if it opened some ?s fanboy/continuity-wise of what DC's " official " explanation of the afterlife/Beyond The Veil was...) How reprinted have Nostrander's 75?? issues of THE SPECTRE been ???

Figserello said:

Who's next: Red, White & Blue? Percival Popp? Doiby Dickles?

 

John Ostrander wrote a Spectre story starring Percival Popp.  It was really fine and moving.  It had much truth in it, and has stayed with me a long time. 

 

There're no bad characters, just bad writing!

Ostrander's Spectre has been criminally under-reprinted - just the first 4 issues, I think, maybe with a spooky glow-in-the-dark cover, or that might be just the gimmick first issue I have.  I see only issue 0 is available from Comixology.  It was a minor masterpiece in its totality.  I must reread it someday.  I have it sitting on standby back at my Mum's house for someone to bring over to me here.

 

One thing against it's reprinting is that it plays very fair with the continuity of the time, and did wonderful things with Thomas' various tootling with the JSA, to make human stories out of that material.  But as DC keeps resetting things, continuity won't matter so much and DC might be more open to reprinting this series.

 

But I heard that there wasn't a great market for James Robinson's Starman, so if that can't sell, I don't see what could.

 

Anyway the Percival Pop issue in question was #24. (Spoilers under the link.)

 

BTW - I was quoting our Captain himself from the initial post above.  If this was the navy, I should be flogged for insubordination.

I think they did a glow-in-the dark issue for issue 1, and maybe issue 8 as well. And possibly the first, short trade.

I'd love to see The Spectre reprinted; I was looking through my issues recently and realized I was missing 5 or 6 of the first 20 issues. It's a great series.



Figserello said:

BTW - I was quoting our Captain himself from the initial post above.  If this was the navy, I should be flogged for insubordination.

No grog for you, swabbie!

Emerkeith, as a Moderator, I am asking that you refrain from using all caps in your posts, as you did here.  You may not be aware that it is considered the online equivalent of shouting. 

Also, I know Figs didn't state he was quoting Cap, but that quote came from a post only three posts above the one Figs made.  I know time can be limited if you are on a public computer, but I think if you had read from Figs' post back you probably would have found the quote in less time than it took to type out your post.  Just something I ask you to think about for the next time.
 
Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...A VERY QUICK SCAN OF THESE LAST TWO PAGES COULD NOT FIND WHAT YOU'RE QUOTING , FIGS . i AM VERY RUSHED NOW .

  WHAT WAS IT , PLEASE ???????

  OOPER , EVEN TOO RUSHED TO CORRECT & RE-POST THE ABOVE !!!!!!!!! (& that , that last line :--)

  I have always meant to bring that story up , it was the first time I had ever even SEEN an image of PPtSC - it was touching , indeed... (Even if it opened some ?s fanboy/continuity-wise of what DC's " official " explanation of the afterlife/Beyond The Veil was...) How reprinted have Nostrander's 75?? issues of THE SPECTRE been ???

Figserello said:

Who's next: Red, White & Blue? Percival Popp? Doiby Dickles?

 

John Ostrander wrote a Spectre story starring Percival Popp.  It was really fine and moving.  It had much truth in it, and has stayed with me a long time. 

 

There're no bad characters, just bad writing!

Captain Comics said:



Figserello said:

BTW - I was quoting our Captain himself from the initial post above.  If this was the navy, I should be flogged for insubordination.

 

No grog for you, swabbie!



That's hitting me where I live!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service