Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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LJ, I really liked this run of Moon Knight. Yeah, he's crazy like the Joker but Charles Huston and Mike Benson pulled it off, unlike Bendis in the most current run.

Lumbering Jack said:

Moon Knight No. 21 (2008ish): I have always wanted to try this series, but this issue and the one before are not anything to entice me into it. This is just after Civil War, and Moon Knight is being hunted by Tony Stark, Norman Osborne and Thunderbolts. I like the idea of a crazy MK -- an over the edge Batman -- but I'm not entirely sold on its execution here. I do love the dialogue though, just not the plot.

A few items ...

Malcolm X, a biography by Andrew Helfer (words) and Randy Du Burke (pictures).

Starting Coward, another collection of Ed Brubaker's Criminal series of miniseries.

Started American Vampire Vol. 5 (still no volume title!). These collections sure give bang for the buck; there are so many issues contained that I'm only going to read the first set this weekend, the miniseries "Lord of Nightmares" (with art by Dustin Nguyen).

Also started the Vertigo miniseries Sandman Mystery Theatre: Sleep of Reason (written by old favorite John Ney Rieber, illustrated by Eric Nguyen). I was surprised to notice that I randomly wound up with two artists named Nguyen this weekend.The story revisits Wesley Dodds, the Sandman with the gas mask and the sleep gas gun. There is a photojournalist who seems to be fated to take up the Sandman mantle. The story opens with Wesley and Dian visiting Afghanistan in 1997, then cuts to ten years later with the photojournalist covering war in Afghanistan. 

I went looking for one thing and found a bunch of stuff I thought I had lost. Included in that were all my documents for charter membership in the Superman Club. Unfortunately, because I kept all this in the orginal envelope, some of the ink from one one form bled through to another. Although, my certificate of membership is still in the condition it came in. In fact, I never signed it. Now I have a question. Should I sign it now or should I leave it as is? Also in my stash of stuff was a fold out poster of all the DC heroes. Plus other junk I'd forgotten about. Still haven't found the thing I was looking for, though.

Oh I'm fascinated now. When you say "a poster of all the DC heroes"
Just who qualifies in that poster??



Jimmm Kelly said:

I went looking for one thing and found a bunch of stuff I thought I had lost. Included in that were all my documents for charter membership in the Superman Club. Unfortunately, because I kept all this in the orginal envelope, some of the ink from one one form bled through to another. Although, my certificate of membership is still in the condition it came in. In fact, I never signed it. Now I have a question. Should I sign it now or should I leave it as is? Also in my stash of stuff was a fold out poster of all the DC heroes. Plus other junk I'd forgotten about. Still haven't found the thing I was looking for, though.

I remember seeing this poster somewhere and thinking to myself, Oh, I used to have that. I thought it was in the DC Vault, but looking there I don't see it. It's 4 times comic book size or 2 times tabloid size and the art looks like it's by Dick Giordano and someone else. Shows: Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman (all large size); and then in smaller size: Black Lightning, Karate Kid, Dr. Mid-Nite, Huntress, Robin, Aquaman, Enemy Ace, Sgt. Rock, Green Arrow, Black Canary, Power Girl, Sun Boy, Dawnstar, Chameleon Boy, Ultra Boy, Mon-El, Hawkman, Captain Marvel, Mary Marvel, Cosmic Boy (in his naked corset), Wildfire, Phantom Girl, Green Lanten, Dr. Fate and the Flash.

I read a couple of awfully boring comics today:

The Scarlet Spider #19: This was just horrible. I wanted so much to like this, because I'm all behind the (soon to be over) Superior Spider-Month. This is the one issue that just doesn't work me from the whole month's worth of Spider-Comics. Scarlet Spider (who wears black) and Wolverine battle a half-naked lady (in Kaine's own words). It's really just nothing more than that. The dialog is terribly stilted, and it reads like a comic from 1993. I didn't even really get what was going on other than that.

Lazarus #2: The book that I really enjoyed last month just didn't get any better, and in fact got a little more boring. I really wanted to like this, because I normally like it any time Greg Rucka writes a book. The rich families who run the world each have their own regenerating bodyguard, it seems. Michael Lark's art is even boring somehow. I don't like it when he's inked by Stephano Guadiano (I know I butchered that name). It looks more like Guadiano's work and less like Lark's. I loved the Michael Lark from Terminal City and Scene of the Crime. But this is just so plain and undiscerning. I looked so forward to issue #1, but now, unless I hear it becomes awesome, I won't read #3. If I do hear it's awesome, I'll pick up the trade.

I also read a couple awesome issues:

Morbius the Living Vampire #7: Loved this one! Morbius goes on patrol with Spider-Ock to stop a villain who possesses an Ultimate Nullfiier. Great characterization, and I really like where this title is going. Unfortunately, I can't imagine the sales are that great.

Wolverine and the X-Men #33: The two heroes of this book: Toad and Quentin! What a fantastic take on two fairly complex X-folk. I do hope that punk Kade is really getting his just desserts right now.

Just reviewed the MAGICMAN ARCHIVES.

I read Batman, Inc. #13. I thought it was alright. I'm waiting to see all of the symbolism I missed upon a first reading. But yeah, not bad.

Advice please!

I've been very close to getting into this new Scarlet Spider stuff ( I read his part in the 'Minimum Carnage' from my local library) and was about to order the opening trade - now I realise the ish you've just reviewed is some distance down that line but I like to get fully into a series when I start.

Do you recommend it or not?

Wandering Sensei: Emeritus said:

I read a couple of awfully boring comics today:

The Scarlet Spider #19: This was just horrible. I wanted so much to like this, because I'm all behind the (soon to be over) Superior Spider-Month. This is the one issue that just doesn't work me from the whole month's worth of Spider-Comics. Scarlet Spider (who wears black) and Wolverine battle a half-naked lady (in Kaine's own words). It's really just nothing more than that. The dialog is terribly stilted, and it reads like a comic from 1993. I didn't even really get what was going on other than that.

I thought the opening arc was okay, but then I dropped off for awhile. The opening several issues have art by Ryan Stegman and are very strong. I think you'll like the first few issues. Since then, the quality in the stories has gone down. I checked back in on the last issue, and was pretty appalled, as you can see above.

One book I was quite pleased with: Same Difference, a graphic novel by Derek Kirk Kim.

As noted on the cover, it won an Eisner Award, a Harvey Award and an Ignatz Award.

What's it about? Well, it's hard to describe without giving away the entire plot, but it's at heart a slice-of-life story. The leads are Simon and Nancy, a pair of twentysomething post-high schoolers in the San Francisco Bay area, circa 2000. As the story begins, they're eating lunch with another friend, Ian, when Simon notices someone at the bus stop outside. It's a blind girl from Pacifica he knew in high school and hasn't spoken to since he let internalized peer pressure and maintaining his perceived place in the social order override his loyalty to her.

Later, he walks Nancy home, and learns she has a package, from a man who has been sending dozens of letters to the previous tenant. The contents of the letters make it clear the letter writer is a stalker; the package came because Nancy wrote to him in the guise of the previous tenant, intimating she wants to reconcile. On a whim, Nancy talks Simon into making a day trip to Pacifica to see what this guy looks like(!) 

What happens thereafter is interesting and charming; Nancy and Simon are good friends with a good rapport, and they talk about life and progress and where life does and doesn't take you. The book earned all those awards; the characterization is spot on, as Nancy and Simon feel like real people, people you would want to hang with, a bit overwhelmed and confused about life, regretting some things they've done, but learning from them, too. 

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