What other Golden Age revivals should there have been in the Silver Age?

There weren't any further Silver Age revivals from the Golden Age after the Spectre (as far as I know - does Red Tornado count?), which has always been a disappointment to me. I think Wildcat, Black Canary and Dr Fate would have made interesting reboots. Possibly Dr Midnight and Hourman. These are characters, like Hawkman, that visually wouldn't have needed much of a revamp.

 

What Silver Age revivals of Golden Age characters do you think would have worked as an on going series?

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I think Schwartz was an editor who took his job seriously. The "writer-editors" who came later didn't really function as editors. These later editors could have added a new series at the drop of a hat, since the writers were only writing and calling themselves editors.

Some writers really need an editor, and it's very obvious when they don't get one that actually edits.

All writers need an editor, if only to catch typos and plot points that make perfect sense to a writer but don't really pan out. Even if they aren't doing any significant editing, a second set of eyes will make a writer look better.

I suppose there were reasons why the Marvel editor-writers were allowed to operate as they did, but they should have known better, even if it was almost too good to be true not to have an editor.

-- MSA

As talented as he was there were places where Jack Kirby needed one. The Fourth World might have lasted longer.

For some reason, it really seemed like DC was really worried about brand dilution, at least when it came to the JLA--after all, when they finally did launch a JSA title, they went to such extreme pains to hide it that they titled it All-Star Comics starring the Super Squad!  Talk about burying your lead!  As for the "relative stiffs" getting try outs, I assume that once all the JSAers with Earth-1 counterparts were off the table (why try Jay Garrick or Alan Scott out for their own book/books when Barry & Hal were selling just fine?), that left the four heroes we got to see, the Dr. Mid-Nite & Spectre team-up that was tossed out in favor of a Spectre solo (probably for the best), and whatever combinations they could make of Mr. Terrific, either Red Tornado,  & Johnny Thunder (I feel like I'm forgetting someone, but who?  I've always thought that either the original Harlequin or Hawkgirl should have joined the JSA to replace Black Canary when she switched Earths, but that's outside of this time-frame...)

They never did seem to like the name Justice Society of America. Even back during the war they were being called the Justice Battalion. I can see continuing All-Star Comics where it left off (sort of what they did with Flash when Jay Garrick's last issue, #104, was followed by Barry Allen's first, #105) with #58, but the Super Squad, I presume, was Robin, Power Girl, and Star-Spangled Kid, and I don't know about anybody else, but I wanted to see Flash, Green Lantern, and Doctor Fate, not the Earth-2 version of the Teen Titans.

As near as I can tell, no one else (or at least, not many) wanted to see the "Junior JSA" either--altho what Robin was doing in that group at his age, I'll never know--considering that just his costumed career ran from 1940 until 1976 at that point, the Robin persona was pushing 40, and Dick himself had to be in spitting distance of 50!  Sure, the Kid would have been the same age, if not for the whole time-warp thing, and Power Girl was actually older than that, being roughly the same age as Kal-L, but some sort of semi-suspended animation in her spaceship caused her to arrive on Earth decades after her cousin, but physically in her late teens or so, but either way, those two were still physically & emotionally teens (roughly college age teens, but still not quite "adults"), while poor Dick was physically & emotionally old enough to be their father, but the JSA still stuck him at the Kiddie Table.

Interesting how they later reused Power Girl's origin for at least one post-Crisis version of Supergirl, while the animated JLA made PG a clone of SG.

Perhaps they just thought "a Teen Titans group needs a Robin" and didn't think about how old he'd be.

Ron M. said:

They never did seem to like the name Justice Society of America. Even back during the war they were being called the Justice Battalion. I can see continuing All-Star Comics where it left off (sort of what they did with Flash when Jay Garrick's last issue, #104, was followed by Barry Allen's first, #105) with #58, but the Super Squad, I presume, was Robin, Power Girl, and Star-Spangled Kid, and I don't know about anybody else, but I wanted to see Flash, Green Lantern, and Doctor Fate, not the Earth-2 version of the Teen Titans.

I recall reading Julie Schwartz's (in case anyone didn't know, he was the editor of the original All-Star Comics for the last several years) thoughts that the title "Justice Society of America" sounds too much like the name of a social-type club, rather than a team of superheroes, something he wished to avoid, when he and Gardner Fox - sort-of - revived the JSA as the Justice League of America.

"Justice League of America" sounds catchier, although a "league" is perhaps more of a collection of teams, or groups, than a collection of individuals, in my opinion.  

Actually, I never really thought about it before, but where in the heck did the Justice Society's name come from in the first place?  The Seven Soldiers of Victory name was inspired by the Seven Champions of Christendom, the All-Winners were a Squad, and the Marvels were a Family, but a "Society" isn't exactly a grouping that inspires excitement or promises action.  I suppose it does describe a bunch of guys sitting around a fancy hotel swapping stories--is it possible that the JSA was originally intended to only be a framing device for an anthology, as it was in All-Star #3

I don't know I've ever heard where the term "Society" came from originally. It might have just seemed like the right term for a group of people getting together that wasn't as "association" or organization.

Julie has said he updated the name with baseball as his inspiration, but I agree--"League" sounds like a group of groups, both from MLB and the League of Nations. It doesn't seem like a club of individuals.

Probably by the 1960s, "League" sounded more up to date and serious than "Society." I'm not sure what a better option would be. Most groups just have a name (Avengers, Defenders, Champions, Challengers, etc.), not a description like that.

-- MSA

I remember reading that in the Silver and Bronze Ages Marvel, DC, and a few other companies played each other in softball games. How far back were they doing that?

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