Just bringing this discussion over to ning...

What books are you reading right now that don't have a narrative driven by images as well as words?

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But he was a great STORYTELLER, a great YARN-SPINNER. He keeps you turning the pages just to find out what happens next.

Exactly.  Love Burroughs, and especially the Mar series.  I dig 'em out and re-read them about once a decade.

I just started The Friends of Eddie Coyle by George V. Higgins. It is a tiny book, so it shouldn't take me too long to finish it.

I've just finished Inspector Imanishi Investigates, a translation of the 1961 novel Suna no Utsuwa by Seichō Matsumoto. This is a murder mystery. The novel opens with the discovery of a murder victim. The initial police investigation fails and is closed, but Imanishi continues to investigate on his own initiative. This is called in the novel a voluntary investigation, but the investigation is not unofficial as we would understand the term as he does most of the work on the clock rather than in his private time. Most of the novel has a police procedural character; Imanishi writes letters requesting information, travels to various parts of Japan, conducts interviews and so on. The novel also depicts his home life. I found the novel easy to get through but not really gripping until the resolution, where the solution turns out to have a quite interesting element. There is also interest in the novel's portrayal of the Japanese. The 1974 film of the novel is reportedly regarded as a classic.

Started Robin Hobb's City of Dragons this afternoon.  She's one of my favorite fantasy authors and I'm excited about her new book.  I also have Naomi Novik's latest novel, Crucible of Gold, waiting at the library so I can read back to back dragon books for Year of the Dragon if I want.

I've read that one awhile ago (Surprise!). I must remember to dig it out and take another look at it.  I remember enjoying it, but I don't remember all the details.

Luke Blanchard said:

I've just finished Inspector Imanishi Investigates, a translation of the 1961 novel Suna no Utsuwa by Seichō Matsumoto. This is a murder mystery. The novel opens with the discovery of a murder victim. The initial police investigation fails and is closed, but Imanishi continues to investigate on his own initiative. This is called in the novel a voluntary investigation, but the investigation is not unofficial as we would understand the term as he does most of the work on the clock rather than in his private time. Most of the novel has a police procedural character; Imanishi writes letters requesting information, travels to various parts of Japan, conducts interviews and so on. The novel also depicts his home life. I found the novel easy to get through but not really gripping until the resolution, where the solution turns out to have a quite interesting element. There is also interest in the novel's portrayal of the Japanese. The 1974 film of the novel is reportedly regarded as a classic.

Just My Type: a book about fonts by Simon Garfield. If you had bet me 6 months ago I would be reading a book about fonts you would have taken all of my money. It is pretty interesting though.

I just finished Before the Golden Age 2, edited by Isaac Asimov. This contains "Tumithak of the Corridors" and "Tumithak in Shawm" by Charles R. Tanner, "The Moon Era" by Jack Williamson and "The Man Who Awoke" by Laurence Manning.

 

Of these I liked "The Moon Era" the most. Some of its creatures reminded me of Stanley G. Weinbaum's "A Martian Odyssey". "The Man Who Awoke" was the first of a series of stories about a man who uses suspended animation to visit different periods in the far future. I'd read another in the series. I like the idea "Tumithak of the Corridors" is based around - in the future, human beings live in underground corridors - more than the story itself. The sequel is a humans-reduced-to-savagery-vs.-alien-invaders story. There is a website devoted to Tanner's work here which has these stories and two further Tumithak tales, as well as other works by Tanner.

 

This post displaced the thread Rogues Bracketology: DD vs WW (Ask Mr. Silver Age) CBG #1689, May 2012 from the home page.

Now I've finished Final Curtain, by mystery writer Ngaio Marsh. The novel is more a whodunit than a mystery where the crime seems deeply mysterious, although we don't learn how exactly the crime was committed until the end.

Now, Japan Sinks (Nippon Chinbotsu), a 1973 novel by Sakyo Komatsu. In the edition I read the book was retitled The Death of the Dragon, but it has also appeared in English under the former title.

 

The plot concerns the destruction of Japan by geological movements. I found it a slow read, as it's very description-oriented. There have been two movie versions, in 1973 and 2006, and a 2006 parody called The World Sinks Except Japan. I think it's likely either the book or the first movie inspired the story in X-Men (vol. 1) ##118-119.

I've been reading a book called The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains by Nicholas Carr. I'm about a third of the way through. Already, though, I'm convinced to go all day on Sunday (from now on, of course) to go internet-free. Of course, during the summers, I may be more likely to do this during the week. It's going to be hard what with having the web on my phone and all.

I've just finished Closely Watched Trains, a novella by the Czech author Bohumil Hrabal. This is a story about a young Czech railway dispatcher during WWII. A film version appeared in 1966. The edition I read is from the Northwestern University Press series European Classics.

Now, The Stars Must Wait by Keith Laumer. The story mostly takes place in the future after a social collapse. The protagonist is a pre-collapse man who awakens into this future from a state of suspended animation. The novel is an expanded version of Laumer's story "The Night of the Trolls", and the joins of the expansion show. I thought it started in an uninspired way - but I was judging it as a work from 1990, and this section of the book is based on "Trolls", which first appeared in 1963 - and found its middle section, which doesn't come from "Trolls", more original and interesting in its depiction of a society almost without compassion. Its greater interest (for me) and awkward fit with the beginning and end make me wonder if this part of the novel was drawn from an uncompleted or unpublished work. The conclusion returns to following "Trolls", but with a significant change.

 

This post displaced the thread Al Jaffee's Mad Life, by Mary-Lou Weisman from the home page.

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