Secret Empire 0 pulls together threads from several different books which constitute the prologue. They are conveniently laid out here:

I only read the Steve Rogers issue and didn’t really feel like I needed to read the rest to follow what was going on in Secret Empire 0. In Steve Rogers 16 we see Cap’s secret plan start to coalesce as Hydra seeks to reassemble the Cosmic Cube without reawakening Kobik and Zemo appears to kill Bucky.


This brings us to Secret Empire 0 wherein it is outlined that the Cosmic Cube was apparently created by American scientists during the World War II era and used to create the reality that we know as the original Marvel Universe.  Hyrdra’s plan is to use Cap to “undo” that “fake” reality and restore the “true” reality in which Hydra conquers the world.  So they appear to be telling us that the entire Marvel Universe is all just one big EYKIW.

On the other hand, we are still getting the intro text page telling us that Kobik has rewritten reality.  In which case this whole Captain Hydra saga is just one big bad dream that can be Bobby Ewinged out of existence at any time.

In the meantime Nick Spencer has started knocking down the dominos that he has nicely put into place over the last year or so.  This isn’t just a bunch of random stuff thrown together to sell a summer crossover. There appears to have actually been a lot of planning that went into this.

Here’s the way it will unfold going forward:

It doesn't appear that there are too many tie-ins or spin-offs, although I suppose that could change but so far I'm on board for the main series and probably Uprising as well.

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To my mind, it's not so much that it's lazy, but that it's been done to death.  It is impossible to take "IN THIS ISSUE: CAPTAIN EGGBEATER DIES!" seriously anymore, because you know that he'll be back in some form or another.

As long as American comics are set up in such a way that a return to the status quo is inevitable, it will be impossible to believe in story developments that claim that "WITH THIS STORY, EVERYTHING CHANGES!"

She was killed by the Hand and brought back, now she's been killed by Steve and will be brought back, after a while death must be as boring to the characters as it is for the reader.



The Baron said:

To my mind, it's not so much that it's lazy, but that it's been done to death.  It is impossible to take "IN THIS ISSUE: CAPTAIN EGGBEATER DIES!" seriously anymore, because you know that he'll be back in some form or another.

As long as American comics are set up in such a way that a return to the status quo is inevitable, it will be impossible to believe in story developments that claim that "WITH THIS STORY, EVERYTHING CHANGES!"

I just picture them at the employment office:  "What do you mean my benefits were cancelled? I was only dead for a month!"

It depends on the creators, and the story. Brubaker & Epting made Cap's death work well. The "death" of Nightwing brought about some great stories in Grayson. The New 52 Superman's death (and assumption by the pre-Flashpoint Superman) have brought the character to a creative high point. Peter Parker's "death" led to some great stories too, not boring at all.

Written about baldly on message boards, death is never exciting, it's just an item on an accounting ledger. In the stories themselves, the writers and artists can imbue those moments with passion and grief.

Horn'd One said:

OK, so they killed off Rick Jones & Black Widow. How soon & what gimmick will they do to bring them back?

Is James Rhodes going to stay dead?



ClarkKent_DC said:

Horn'd One said:

OK, so they killed off Rick Jones & Black Widow. How soon & what gimmick will they do to bring them back?

Is James Rhodes going to stay dead?

It would really stink to be the one guy who stays dead.

Judging by Mr. Oz, *no one* stays dead forever. It's been, what, 78 years? And now, boom, he's back.

The Baron said:



ClarkKent_DC said:

Horn'd One said:

OK, so they killed off Rick Jones & Black Widow. How soon & what gimmick will they do to bring them back?

Is James Rhodes going to stay dead?

It would really stink to be the one guy who stays dead.

For once or twice maybe, but three, then four, then five then six?  At what point does it become a self parody?

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

It depends on the creators, and the story. Brubaker & Epting made Cap's death work well. The "death" of Nightwing brought about some great stories in Grayson. The New 52 Superman's death (and assumption by the pre-Flashpoint Superman) have brought the character to a creative high point. Peter Parker's "death" led to some great stories too, not boring at all.

Written about baldly on message boards, death is never exciting, it's just an item on an accounting ledger. In the stories themselves, the writers and artists can imbue those moments with passion and grief.

Marketing: the ultimate force in comic books.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

Judging by Mr. Oz, *no one* stays dead forever. It's been, what, 78 years? And now, boom, he's back.

The Baron said:



ClarkKent_DC said:

Horn'd One said:

OK, so they killed off Rick Jones & Black Widow. How soon & what gimmick will they do to bring them back?

Is James Rhodes going to stay dead?

It would really stink to be the one guy who stays dead.



Mark S. Ogilvie said:

 Would have made far more sense to have this in the story instead of the epilogue/next event prologue.  We could have seen the reasoning and emotions behind all the personal decisions of the military and political office holders who proved when they went along with Steve that the oaths they took to preserve, protect and defend the constitution are absolutely meaningless.  

I don't know, that sounds really boring to me. I don't want to read about police officers and politicians.  Most of them don't uphold the constitution in real life, so I didn't waste too much time worrying about it in this story.  Stevil gave his viewpoint in pretty much every issue of the series. It was actually explained with a fair amount of detail. It was left to the reader to fill in the blanks as to how people would be forced or controlled to go along with him. And that doesn't take too much imagination since it has happened throughout history over and over again. The epilogue was intended to show the real Captain America and how his views contrasted with Stevil's. That couldn't have been done during the series since the real Cap didn't exist at that time.

I don't think it was too hard to tell tht story. I just think they didn't want to tell that story. And I know I didn't want to read it.

The Baron said:

As long as American comics are set up in such a way that a return to the status quo is inevitable, it will be impossible to believe in story developments that claim that "WITH THIS STORY, EVERYTHING CHANGES!"

It's a form of discarding continuity. The reversed stories don't matter any more, unless the characters make an issue of the new version of what happened. ("But I thought you were dead!" "I can't forgive you for that! You should've found out I wasn't!")

A status quo-changing story that you mean to reverse all along is a form of imaginary story. The difference is an imaginary story admits it's an imaginary story. The other kind says "I'm not! I'm not! I'm not! Fooled you - I actually am!"

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